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Difference Between Good & Great Crankbait Rods?

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Is there a need to use "premium" crankbait rods, or are the <$100 offerings good enough (assuming they have appropriate power & actions)?

I've never had a dedicated crankbait rod and I'm trying to understand why a G Loomis CBR is worth $100+ more than the approx $100 crankin' rods that are quite popular.  Or, for that matter, should I just continue using my slightly underpowered MF spinning rod (its the slowest Med power rod that I have).  I only use shallow cranks.

Thanks

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Crank baits are my main weapon and it is my opinion that you really don't need an expensive rod to throw your cranks with.

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i personally would not spend the same amt of money on a crank rod that i would a plastic/jig rod. sensitivity is not as important when using a crank. although it is nice to have a decent rod to be able to detect when youre hitting grass etc....

most people like a moderate action so as not to jerk the bait out of the fishes mouth.

do you lose many fish on your fast action rod because of the taper? maybe use mono for a little more strech?

i dont use cranks much so i dont own anything more moderate than a fast action but i dont seem lose too many fish on the hook set when i do toss them out.

if i bought a moderate or mod/fast rod id probably spend less than $150. i'd look for an avid on sale.

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Thanks Guys, so far that is what I expected.  Moderate, to Moderate/Fast with the features I like (reel seat, guides, grips, warranty, etc...).  After growing up with Fiberglass rods, I shifted to graphite a few years ago.  I'm not sure I'm ready to go back :)

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Here is a specific suggestion: Avid AVC66MF.

Although the rod is MF, the tip is soft. This

is perfect for all treble hooks, except deep

divers. The rod really shines when you are

working topwater and jerkbaits. You will like

the way it handles shallow crankbaits, too!

8-)

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The debate over "need" versus "want" is a common theme when selecting tackle.  A less expensive crankbait rod will do the job, but will it do it as well as a more expensive rod?  To each their own, but I want the most sensitive crankbait rod I can get.  I love cranking and have a few dedicated combos for specific situations.  I like the feel I get with a quality crankbait rod - I believe they help me detect the bottom composition, cover, and of course strikes better than some less expensive rods I've used in the past. 

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My particular crankbait rod is the least expensive rod out of all my setups. It's a spinning setup for shallow to medium diving crankbaits (8-10ft) fishing from the shore. It has done well for me and is fiberglass and I use it with braid. This year I will be using the same setup with flouro and see if it performs as well. Later in the season I will probably be switching over to a dedicated Baitcasting setup with the KVD cranking rod and the Quantum Energy.

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I personally like a more sensitive rod for cranking.  I started out with a BPS Crankin Stick which is a great, cheap cranking rod.  Then I got my Lucky Craft cranking rod and it's a world of difference.  You don't notice the need of a more expensive cranking rod until you use one.  To be able to tell the difference between a fish, weed, rock, etc... is very helpful.  The Lucky Craft rod isn't top end by any means but many people think $150 is too much for a cranking rod but it's money well spent.

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This conversation has come up before.  The reality is that you don't need high end equipment for anything.  Anyone can use a Snoopy Special combo and catch some fish.  It all comes down to personal preference.  If you feel a crankbait rod is something you want to spend less on, well, you will still catch fish on it.  I personally try to buy what I feel is the most sensitive rod for every lure I fish.  With a more sensitive rod (from what I was using before), I can tell what type of structure or cover my lure is hitting off of.  I like to think it has helped me catch a few more fish and I couldn't imagine a sensitive rod as being a detriment.  Though, as I mentioned before, it all comes down to what your personal and economical preferences are.

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Here is a specific suggestion: Avid AVC66MF.

Although the rod is MF, the tip is soft. This

is perfect for all treble hooks, except deep

divers. The rod really shines when you are

working topwater and jerkbaits. You will like

the way it handles shallow crankbaits, too!

8-)

Is there a reason you are suggesting the 6'6 instead of a 7' or longer? I think I'm gonna buy one, but I was looking at a 7 footer and was just wondering if there was a big difference between the two. Also, at what depth do you start considering crankbaits deep divers, and what do you reccomend for a deep diver rod? 

Thanks

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I generally prefer 7' rods, but 6 1/2' is easier

to work for certain techniques: topwater and

jerkbaits. If the rig is going to be used strictly

for shallow and/or medium size crankbaits, my

choice is the Avid AVC70MM.

8-)

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Don 't know where you guys fish your cranks but as for me, look at the pic, rod sensitivity is important to maneuver the crank through all the mess what 's undernearth.

I once had a Kistler Mag TS crankbait series, I can say all bad things about several components except in one department, the blank in that rod was outstanding, not only by the way it behaved but also about the sensitivity, sure, it 's not a CBR but it was a 180 dollars rod.

post-369-130162928304_thumb.jpg

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vaya charquito que tienes!

Nice, isn 't it ?  :)

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I generally prefer 7' rods, but 6 1/2' is easier

to work for certain techniques: topwater and

jerkbaits. If the rig is going to be used strictly

for shallow and/or medium size crankbaits, my

choice is the Avid AVC70MM.

8-)

Would this rod be good for traps too?

Thanks

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Thanks to everyone who has been sharing their thoughts :)

I once had a Kistler Mag TS crankbait series, I can say all bad things about several components except in one department, the blank in that rod was outstanding, not only by the way it behaved but also about the sensitivity, sure, it 's not a CBR but it was a 180 dollars rod.

Raul, was it an all graphite blank or the glass/graphite composite?

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I ended up finding a Kistler Argon 6'9" graphite crankbait rod on closeout.  Although its rated up to 3/4 oz lures, it feels almost like ML power.

I wasn't planning to mate it with my Chronarch 51Mg, but it was so light I had to give it a try.   The combo feels so good, the 51Mg may have a new home.   :)

I was very impressed at how well this combo tossed a 1/4 oz shallow crankbait (especially considering my skill level with BC gear).  I was also surprised at how sensitive this rod was.  I was even feeling little Maple leaves that got hooked on the bait.  I only had one strike, but the chubby 14 incher hooked itself with just a slight pull in terms of setting the hook.

While I don't know how the Argon compares to other crankbait rods, I think my confidence will increase by having a dedicated crankbait rod.

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I use a 6'6" fiberglass rod for my shallow cranks. Its a David Frits signiture rod from american rodsmiths. check it out

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I happen to use a CBR845 paired with a Daiwa Sol. It is my most expensive combo based on replacement cost. I used to work at Sportsman's Warehouse and ended up getting the rod for $120 and reel for $110, for that price it was too hard to pass it up. If I hadn't come across that deal I would definitely be using a cheaper combo, something around $250-300 total.

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This conversation has come up before. The reality is that you don't need high end equipment for anything. Anyone can use a Snoopy Special combo and catch some fish. It all comes down to personal preference. If you feel a crankbait rod is something you want to spend less on, well, you will still catch fish on it. I personally try to buy what I feel is the most sensitive rod for every lure I fish. With a more sensitive rod (from what I was using before), I can tell what type of structure or cover my lure is hitting off of. I like to think it has helped me catch a few more fish and I couldn't imagine a sensitive rod as being a detriment. Though, as I mentioned before, it all comes down to what your personal and economical preferences are.

x2

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This conversation has come up before. The reality is that you don't need high end equipment for anything. Anyone can use a Snoopy Special combo and catch some fish. It all comes down to personal preference. If you feel a crankbait rod is something you want to spend less on, well, you will still catch fish on it. I personally try to buy what I feel is the most sensitive rod for every lure I fish. With a more sensitive rod (from what I was using before), I can tell what type of structure or cover my lure is hitting off of. I like to think it has helped me catch a few more fish and I couldn't imagine a sensitive rod as being a detriment. Though, as I mentioned before, it all comes down to what your personal and economical preferences are.

x2

Excellent reply.

8-)

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I think it is all personal preference...I know guys that use at least $200 rods for all their fishing, but use the BPS Crankin' Stick because they say it is a hands down better rod than anything else out there.   I have a BPS Crankin Stick and I love it, but I have felt some friends higher end crankbait rods, and I like theirs better, but money was an issue at the time. 

I too think that the biggest factor is weight, followed by sensitivity. 

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.

Here is a specific suggestion: Avid AVC66MF.

Although the rod is MF, the tip is soft. This

is perfect for all treble hooks, except deep

divers. The rod really shines when you are

working topwater and jerkbaits. You will like

the way it handles shallow crankbaits, too!

8-)

Indeed, I own 2 of these and you will not be dissapointed! I hook crappies on my jerks anc cranks all the time and this rod is soft enough to land most of them! I have the 7 footer too, I like it for plastics. I use mostly shallow cranks.

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Crankbait rods MAKE the setup.  I used to use an ALL Star.  I would typically land about 3 out of 5 fish.  I purchased a Quantam KVD Tour crankbait rod.  I now land 9 out of 10 fish.

These rods are still only approx $150.  More money won't land any more fish.

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