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Laggyman

Setting the hook : Jigs with weedguards

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What is the proper way to set the hook when using Jigs with the wire weedguards??

I only got 2 bites but I pulled the jig out of the Bass twice in a row... I saw the Bass bite and watched as he took it and turned around. I felt some weight on the rod so I snapped the rod up. The Jig came flying right at me.

I can't seem to get the hook out from the wire. Should I cut the wire a bit?? I'm using a 6'6 MH/F rod so I don't think it's a power problem...

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Jig fishing is definitely not as easy as worm fishing.

I believe that every time I take the jig away from a bass, my strike was too late.

Two things have improved my jig fishing hook-ups (still not what I'd like it to be):

1. Instant Hook-Set

2. PowerPro Braid.

With braided line, a jaw-breaking hook-set isn't necessary and depressing the fiberguard is not a problem.

A "quick" hook-set is important though, regardless of the line being used.

If you're jig fishing with monofilament line, it will help if you thin-out the fibers in the weedguard

and select jigs that use a fine-wire hook (sharp goes w/o saying). Just my opinion.

Roger

 

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First step, GET RID OF EVERY WIRE WEEDGUARD JIG YOU HAVE!!!!!! I've had nothing but trouble those.

Get some good 1/4-1/2oz. jigs with fiber weedguards and remember to set the hook hard and fast. :o

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/agree with basspro

I prefer them as well.  Wire is just to much effort.  Its like putting a big fat 11" worm on a 2/0 hook!  Never going to get anywhere with that.

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Hmmm... fiber??? I don't know if mine is wire or fiber  ;D  Never gave it much thought.  It's the brittle plastic-ish black sticks that come out from the head in bundles.  Probably fiber?

I believe that every time I take the jig away from a bass, my strike was too late.

I always thought I was too early to strike if the lure came right back at me. Does a Bass spit out a jig fast?? If so, does using a Pig (Uncle Josh?) give me more time to hook 'em?

WIth the cold months coming I need a crash course on Jigs!!  :o

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Bass will spit the jig out faster than any other bait I've ever used.  Once they pick the jig up you only have a fraction of time to set the hook.  One thing for me that seems to help them hold on to the jig for at least a fraction longer is if you dip/spray/coat the jig in some type of scent/flavor spray or gel.   My personal favorite is smelly jelly, but it's entirely up to what is available to you.  Any type of crawfish, baitfish, or garlic scent would work.

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I always thought I was too early to strike if the lure came right back at me.

A leadhead jig and fiber bristles is not as mouthable as a T-rigged soft plastic. When you finally feel the bass on a jig,

his work may already be done. I once read that a bass can inhale-and-eject a jig something like 3 times in one second.

Now that isn't how fast they normally pickup & blow-out, but that's how fast they can, if they wanted to.

     To confirm that tardy hook-sets are your problem, try this. Concentrate on a quick-stick, instead of wasting any time

winding-up to "cross his eyes". A quick-stick will usually hang a sharp hook in the bass's mouth, so he can't blow it out.

If you feel that the hook-set did not drive the point beyond the barb, or if you're using nylon line, simply hit him again.

Roger

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Learn to weigh your bait. Explanation: if you can go to a swimming pool, pond, or creek any where with clear water where you can see your bait on the bottom in 5 to 10 of water. First pitch your bait about 10 to 15 yards on the ground, close your eyes a shake or hop the bait. Feel what the bait feels like in no water (I mean really learn it). Then pitch it out in the water and do the same thing. I can feel a Texas rigged worm with a ¼ ounce sinker hit bottom in 15 to 18 foot of water. If you can't you need practice!

Now you are probably asking yourself what does this have to do with feeling a fish bite. Well if your bait feels any different than this, drop the rod, reel the slack, & set the hook!    

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First things first. I think I need to spool up on Fluro or Braid. Nylon just doesn't do the magic. I haven't used braid, and am much more comfortable with Fluro so I think I'll go with that.

The new rod I got is a great help. Much better than the telephone pole I was using until just recently  ;D  I can pick the bites pretty well, and spooling up on Fluro might just help me a bit more.  It's just that the hook doesn't want to go IN!!! The Hooks are very sharp. I tried running them across my nails and they dug in enough to convince me they weren't the problem.  I was quite sure the problem was with the weedguard as I have no trouble hooking up on Texas rigs....

I'll try Rolo's advice and go with a quick snap and see how it works.  

Thanks guys!!

1 more question. I need help setting up Uncle Josh's Pork trailers. How should I set them??

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With a jig the bass has some thing more solid to hold on to than a piece of soft plastic, this requires a harder hook set to move the jig in the bass's mouth.

While I agree a bass can spit a jig faster then you can set hook, I also believe a bass can hold a jig tight enough to stop you from moving the jig in his mouth.

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I'll just have to ask the fish why he doesn't want to get hooked up  ;D

Oh BTW, I thought about it once more, and I figured maybe it wasnt the weedguards that were fouling up my hooksets.. I just remembered I couldn't set the hook when using a exposed hook as well  :o Maybe the Jigs just hate me... OTH I never had a problem with Jighead/worm combinations on a ML Spinning setup... I was doing a sweeping motion to set the hook with the Spinning setup. Maybe I should try a sweeping hookset???

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I have always thinned and cut my weed guards back.     There are too many varibles when jig fishing and all require minor adjustments.

The one cure all is experience.        A bass can inhale a jig with out you ever feeling her, and exhaling it is often the first thump, or bump you feel and you set the hook and whifffffffff'ed it.   Nobody at home!!

Jigs require more concentration in cold water and line watching is very key to detecting subtle bites.  I always hope for aggressive bites, but that isn't the key.

I believe most novice jig fishermen are hesitant on when to set the hook, and jig fishing 101, first rule is when in doubt, set the hook.  

Finesse jigs maybe okay for light line, but most jigs I use are with a minimum of 20lb test, and as Rolo pointed out, a double hook set motion to ensure good penatration is okay and used widely by alot of fishermen.

Matt

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Fan out the weedguard to separate the bristles, it will remain weedless but it won 't bother while hooksetting.

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What you are experiencing is the exact reason most people hate to fish jigs but the solutions described above by everyone will help solve your problem. It takes time to master art of jig fishing and some never get it because they figure it aint worth the aggravation.

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I agree with Catt, fishing a jig can be very frustrating at times, and when you are just learning to fish a jig you might as well plan on having some days where you don't hook up with a single fish the whole day, but once you learn to use them they are very rewarding.  You may not catch huge numbers of fish once you learn a jig, but the quality of the fish you are catching will be a huge upgrade.  It took me a long time to learn to use a jig, but now I fish with it 75% of the time.  If you are really serious about using jigs, the best advice I can give you is to take only take 1 or 2 rods with you, and take a very limit tackle arsenal with you and force yourself to use jigs most of the time you are out on the water until you really learn to fish them.  Another thing that really helped me was to fish jigs in small ponds where I knew there were a lot of fish that will bite most anything.  That really helped me learn what a jig feels like on the end of my line, and what a jig bite feels like.

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Guest avid

IMHO jig fishing is the most difficult lure to really master.

First you really need to cut off at 1/3 of the fibers.  then trim the remaining ones so they barely extend past the hook point.

Now is where I get contorversial.

the biggest problem with jig fishing is feeling the bite.

It is standard wisdom to let the jig drop on semi slack line.  this is the accepted technique because the jig will fall straight down, not pulling away from the bass holding cover and appearing most natural.

I agree with this. Except for beginners to jig fishing.

I couldn't get any success with a jig untill i started fishing it on a tight line with braid.  I was now able to feel the subtle strikes I was previously missing.  Set the hook immediately upon detecting a strike, or thinking there is a fish on (mushy feeling etc.).  I started catching bass.

As you gain experience you can add slack to your presentation, but in the beginning tighten up.  You will detect more bites, catch more fish, gain confidence, and have fun.

good luck

avid

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Cut and Fan out.... Sounds like I'll have to play around with a couple of jigs, including losing a few in the proccess until I can get that down to an art  :) I'll try it on a couple of jigs and see what works with me.  

Catt and Hawgin, Your words are extremely encouraging!! Darned right I'm starting to get frustruated by them darned rubber blobs!   ;)

I fish mainly little ponds so I can practice a bit.  It's just that my hands works by itself. Before my mind registers it, I have a worm attached to the end of the line  :o Wha'!? Who tied that on!?   ;D

Looks like I'll have my hands full this winter trying to figure out jigs. And I'll have to do that before it starts snowing. I can't drive in the snow :-[ Should have bought a 4WD....

Do you have any suggestions how a newb should fish the jig? (Easiest to hookup?)

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IMHO jig fishing is the most difficult lure to really master.

First you really need to cut off at 1/3 of the fibers. then trim the remaining ones so they barely extend past the hook point.

Now is where I get contorversial.

the biggest problem with jig fishing is feeling the bite.

It is standard wisdom to let the jig drop on semi slack line. this is the accepted technique because the jig will fall straight down, not pulling away from the bass holding cover and appearing most natural.

I agree with this. Except for beginners to jig fishing.

I couldn't get any success with a jig untill i started fishing it on a tight line with braid. I was now able to feel the subtle strikes I was previously missing. Set the hook immediately upon detecting a strike, or thinking there is a fish on (mushy feeling etc.). I started catching bass.

As you gain experience you can add slack to your presentation, but in the beginning tighten up. You will detect more bites, catch more fish, gain confidence, and have fun.

good luck

avid

That is some sound advice there avid. Thnx alot! I hadn't thought of fishing it on tight line. I'll try that out. Should I cast a bit further from the target area to compensate for the curved fall?

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Guest avid
IMHO jig fishing is the most difficult lure to really master.

First you really need to cut off at 1/3 of the fibers. then trim the remaining ones so they barely extend past the hook point.

Now is where I get contorversial.

the biggest problem with jig fishing is feeling the bite.

It is standard wisdom to let the jig drop on semi slack line. this is the accepted technique because the jig will fall straight down, not pulling away from the bass holding cover and appearing most natural.

I agree with this. Except for beginners to jig fishing.

I couldn't get any success with a jig untill i started fishing it on a tight line with braid. I was now able to feel the subtle strikes I was previously missing. Set the hook immediately upon detecting a strike, or thinking there is a fish on (mushy feeling etc.). I started catching bass.

As you gain experience you can add slack to your presentation, but in the beginning tighten up. You will detect more bites, catch more fish, gain confidence, and have fun.

good luck

avid

That is some sound advice there avid. Thnx alot! I hadn't thought of fishing it on tight line. I'll try that out. Should I cast a bit further from the target area to compensate for the curved fall?

stop over analyzing

the info provided here is all you need to catch bass

now get out on the water and fish  :o

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stop over analyzing

the info provided here is all you need to catch bass

now get out on the water and fish :o

LOL. I plan on hitting the water next Monday.... Have entrance exams for Univ Sunday so I can't go any earlier :-X

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My dad taught me to use jigs under boat docks, boat docks with depth and some brush.

His goal was for me to swim the jig back to the boat letting the gravity of the fall pendulum back towards the boat.

This kept a fairly tight line with proper holding of the rod...ie when I left my rod tip in  say the 10:00 clock position, you will get some slack as opposed to the 11:00 postition or slightly higher.

It allowed me to see the line twitch as well as feel the intial bite or the line swimming off in one direction.     Dad always said he thought most bites occured on the fall and back in the early 70's, I didn't have lots of reading material or TV shows to say different.    He was right, most bites are on the fall.

I will still fish slack line as much as possible and the line twitch even in heavy winds is detectable, it becomes instinct just as raising your bait over a branch and feeling the resistance, you will learn which is which by only doing it 1000 times over and over.

I would also think the winter time is the hardest time to learn jigs, bites aren't as many, and can be the lightest bite all year, very hard to detect some days.

Time on the water, and don't get frustrated of not catching.

The advice on taking nothing but jigs is a sure way of learning them when you can't lay it down and pick up your confidence bait to catch the fish you normally do.

matt.    

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I've had some good luck these past few years during winter.  And I like the cold weather so Fish or No Fish, a day outside is a day in heaven  :o

Jigs here I come!!!!  ;D

Again, THank you all for all that advice!  I'll post again if I manage to catch anything!

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