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What Type Of Point Is This?

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What type of point is this? Secondary or main? And how would you fish it....... there is a bunch of pea gravel towards the end of it, I discovered it today drop shotting.

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I'd guess it is a secondary point since it doesn't look like you are on the main lake. How I'd fish it would depend on the depth of the water, speed and direction of the wind and the time of year.

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extra words

That is still somewhat confusing. What differentiates the two? Size?

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Main point is really a (main lake point); a point that is in the main body of water. A secondary point is one inside a cove or bay, at least around here.

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Since most of my area lakes are just a main lake here is my opinion.

A main point is a large point. Starting with the largest in the lake and working down. Usually jutting out perpendicular to the shoreline.

A secondary point, to me is a point that juts off of one of the before mentioned points.

Also, I don't consider a point, a point unless it is an underwater point. Land points are more wind/current directors than structure.

All of course IMO.

EDIT: See to me BOTH that are circled are not points at all.

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Jig Fisherman, So since I was able to feel long stretches of what felt like pea gravel with my 1/4 ounce drop shot weight right next to the corner of the point and was able to see large "chunk rock" along the bank of the point when the water level was down in the summer....... would that be a underwater point because of the gravel I felt at the end underwater?

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Jig Fisherman, So since I was able to feel long stretches of what felt like pea gravel with my 1/4 ounce drop shot weight right next to the corner of the point and was able to see large "chunk rock" along the bank of the point when the water level was down in the summer....... would that be a underwater point because of the gravel I felt at the end underwater?

That would just be shoreline cover....

To me, a point is only a point if it contains underwater contour changes that mirror a point.

In this picture, Walkers point, IS a point because it contains underwater contours in point form. As opposed to a shoreline point without any underwater contour change.

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That would just be shoreline cover....

To me, a point is only a point if it contains underwater contour changes that mirror a point.

In this picture, Walkers point, IS a point because it contains underwater contours in point form. As opposed to a shoreline point without any underwater contour change.

That just took me beyond confusion.

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That just took me beyond confusion.

In his lake map, both "points" have contours that follow the same shoreline pattern as the rest of the shoreline around it.

The point in the lake map I pointed out, actually contains a point on the water side not just shore side.

To clarify my point:Ignore shoreline points, and concentrate on lake contour line points.

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here's the way i view 'em

Main lake point- A point that extends into the main body of water

Secondary point- A point that extends(usually perpendicular) off of a main lake point, or a point that is contained within a cove.

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What type of point is this?

Let me ask this: how would labeling it help you catch fish?

It's a point. Whether you call it a main lake point, secondary point, etc. makes no difference.

Bottom line, some points are better than others. You are looking for underwater points.

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I think some consistency in how the terms are used is critical in order to facilitate transfer of knowledge. This is especially true in the case of a new bass fisherman asking for help in breaking down a lake and he is told something to the effect of, "I like to start with main lake points, cuts and bluffs and then move on to secondary points and old road beds". Standardizing terminology is a natural progression in the evolution of the sport as more and more layers of complexity and knowledge are added.

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"I like to start with main lake points, cuts and bluffs and then move on to secondary points and old road beds"

Those are just bass fishing buzzwords used to impress. They tell us nothing about what the fish are doing and why a particular lure or presentation is working. They are also structures that may not apply to waters guys fish. You won't find a road bed in a natural lake. Terms like that are explicitly NOT standardized, and are colloquialisms. We had a detailed discussion here recently about feeder creeks and other fishing terms. There isn't one single definition - that's up to you to define when explaining the problem or situation.

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That would just be shoreline cover....

To me, a point is only a point if it contains underwater contour changes that mirror a point.

In this picture, Walkers point, IS a point because it contains underwater contours in point form. As opposed to a shoreline point without any underwater contour change.

Well said, I agree. I think the more productful points are exactly what you are referring too. A point with underwater contours that eventually drop off into deep BIG bass water. I see alot of shoreline points that are, well just that..no drop, ledges, shelfs or whatever you want to call them.

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Big shoreline points can alter wind patterns, creating current patterns, and therefore influencing baitfish movement. Something to think about, even if the underwater structure is less than attractive.

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Big shoreline points can alter wind patterns, creating current patterns, and therefore influencing baitfish movement. Something to think about, even if the underwater structure is less than attractive.

I agree....

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That would just be shoreline cover....

To me, a point is only a point if it contains underwater contour changes that mirror a point.

In this picture, Walkers point, IS a point because it contains underwater contours in point form. As opposed to a shoreline point without any underwater contour change.

110% totally agree with you on this.

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Those are just bass fishing buzzwords used to impress. They tell us nothing about what the fish are doing and why a particular lure or presentation is working. They are also structures that may not apply to waters guys fish. You won't find a road bed in a natural lake. Terms like that are explicitly NOT standardized, and are colloquialisms. We had a detailed discussion here recently about feeder creeks and other fishing terms. There isn't one single definition - that's up to you to define when explaining the problem or situation.

I agree; that sentence is full of jargon that's meaningless because of the variability in definitions of the terms. Unfortunately they're used ad nauseum. And that's my point. There are too many terms that are more confusing than they are useful in the sport of bass fishing. In order for the sport to continue to develop, those types of terms need to have agreed upon definitions. If my colleagues and I spoke to one another or our patients about "that elbow bendy muscle" instead of using concise standardized terms there would be mass confusion, poor outcomes, etc. Why shouldn't the sport of bass fishing strive to have simple, meaningful, standardized terms that facilitate transfer of knowledge?

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well i thought a main lake point was on the main lake and a secondary point was a point cove or branch of the lake that would not be considered the "main lake". I call them secondary points all the way back to the back of the creek or branch or whatever. When it gets to where you were fishing i call them back water points it just helps me break the area down a little bit more I would probably fish a shaky head or a small crank bait that was a little to deep for the depth of water so it would dig the pea gravel both of them would make noise on the gravel sometimes that helps too. Really what you call a point only matters to you. I a fishes eyes a point can be 3 inches tall and 2 foot long or it could be 3o foot deep and a mile long get my drift

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Those are just bass fishing buzzwords used to impress. They tell us nothing about what the fish are doing and why a particular lure or presentation is working. They are also structures that may not apply to waters guys fish. You won't find a road bed in a natural lake. Terms like that are explicitly NOT standardized, and are colloquialisms. We had a detailed discussion here recently about feeder creeks and other fishing terms. There isn't one single definition - that's up to you to define when explaining the problem or situation.

Well said Francho!

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I don't disagree with you JF, but there is some truth that being able to delineate and differentiate the two. Let's use a large river system impoundment as a an example. A primary point, one being the closest point to the channel at the mouth of a well defined cove, will very often have fish stacked on it at different times of the year. If, in relation to said point a pattern emerges and you tell someone that fish are staging on points where there's current, they may take that to mean that there are fish on every point in the lake. However if you say that fish are on primaries on current side, or on top of, or in 20' on the backside of primaries... It becomes a lot easier to delineate the differences. The same can be said for secondaries, or minor points. The more info you're able to read into a point on a topo map, the better off you are in terms of that delineation process.

As has been covered, a point that extends out into the water is what you're generally after. There will be cases that flat points on primary locations will be loaded with fish, but those times are going to be far fewer than finding fish on points of the other types. Structure on points is hugely important, as is cover. Bottom composition and the way current plays on the point is very important.

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I don't disagree with anything you said, and in fact I could probably expand on your thoughts - much of it applies to many of the "natural impounments" or bays off the big lake that I frequent, especially in regards to current. I think that's a big reason Finger Lakes guys struggle on these bays - they aren't like lakes.

That said, sometimes I will try to generalize things, based on the OP's implied skill level. Right or wrong, that advice will open doors to crticism by more experienced anglers.

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Absolutely agreed.

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I like the main lake points that are under water. Say off a ledge or hump that falls off into the middle of the lake. And therefore being a Creek Channel or River ledge right near them. Lower end of Pickwick has a lot of these. And they hold the best fish and lots of Big Small mouth bass. Plus theres not near as many people beating them to death like the ones on the banks.

But to me I was always told main lake point out on the main section of the lake. Mid point is back in a cove or Creek.

Pete

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