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Does Color Really Matter?

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I am pretty new to bass fishing and overwhelmed with all the different lures out there. My questions is does the lure color really matter so much? I've watched tons of youtube videos and most have there lure color preference according to water clarity and such. If the purpose is to mimic the baitfish in most cases, why change the color regardless of water clarity? Baitfish do not change colors according to the color of the water or wether its cloudy or sun shining so why should the lure? Why not just choose a lure that looks natural to the specific baitfish and fish it regardless of the water clarity? 

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Sometimes color can be critical, but most of the time your favorite color will work just fine.

 

 

 

 

:fishing-026:

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What RW said is right on, sometimes it's nice to have different colors to experiment with, but for the most part a few basic colors seem to get the job done for me

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Sometimes, yes.  Most of the time......NO.  I think shape and size play a bigger role than color.

 

I'm trying to get down to 3 basic colors.  Greens, grays and browns.  I'm a little overboard right now as I have probably 15 or so different shades of watermelon and 10 or so different browns.  I have a problem!

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I am pretty new to bass fishing and overwhelmed with all the different lures out there. My questions is does the lure color really matter so much? I've watched tons of youtube videos and most have there lure color preference according to water clarity and such. If the purpose is to mimic the baitfish in most cases, why change the color regardless of water clarity? Baitfish do not change colors according to the color of the water or wether its cloudy or sun shining so why should the lure? Why not just choose a lure that looks natural to the specific baitfish and fish it regardless of the water clarity? 

They most certainly do.  Well not all together change colors, but they can get darker and lighter.  Have you ever seen a bluegill flare in the middle of spawn?  They are beautiful.

 

Bass don't only eat baitfish.  They eat a multitude of different critters.  Crayfish change colors.  Tadpoles change color and shape.

 

To me color shade(light or dark) is more important than the actual color.  I don't debate the difference between green pumpkin and watermelon black pepper, they are both pretty much the same thing.  But I won't throw either in dark murky water.  I would be more confident in black with red flake, or black with blue flake.

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Thanks for the feedback. I have accumulated a lot of different lures and colors, but probably because they were appealing to me, not the fish. The first bass I caught when I went out actually targeting bass was on a power bait worm. Can't remember the exact color now, but that became the only color I would fish for awhile because it was my confidence bait. Then caught some on colors that were totally opposite of that so thats why I asked. Finesse fishing was all i have really done, but want to get out of my comfort zone and catch some bigger fish. I've only been fishing for about a year and the amount of equipment, lures, etc is overwhelming. I've studied almost non-stop for the last year and feel as though I should have a degree in fishing lol. I buy lures often, but mostly because I like to and someone has mentioned somewhere that it is awesome. After all the reading and research about lures, I sometimes get aggravated just because its so much. Then I remember how much I enjoy being on the water even when I don't catch a thing, which is kinda often. Usually, I have zero patience for everyday crap, but when I'm fishing it's different. I can stay out there for hours and hours and fish without catching a thing and consider it a successful day. Anyway, thanks again for the feedback. This is a great site and very informative for beginners like me. 

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To me color shade(light or dark) is more important than the actual color.

 

I agree with this, I'm more worried if the bass can find my lure easily than specific colors. Like am I gonna throw a dark/bright color

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Here is a suggestion that applies to both colors and different lures:

Test new stuff when the bite is hot. 

 

 

 

:fishing-026:

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Some days, the color does matter. 

 

Or, like my grandfather says, some days it doesn't matter. If the fish is there and they're hungry, they'll hit whatever you throw in front of them. 

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Some days color is critical to getting bit on hard baits. But like others have mentioned some days any color choice will do. I think it has more to do with water clarity & light penetration under the water than actual color as we perceive it.  

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I've experienced days where color mattered, I've experienced days when color didn't matter, & I've experienced days where I had to change colors often  ;)

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I don't buy into the theory of enabling a bass to "find" your bait. LMB is the apex predator in most lakes, you really think it needs crutches like bright colors or loud rattles to find your bait? The species would have been extinct if they did. Nature tries to blend in, not stand out.

What really matters is if the bait selection, presentation, and color makes the bass "want" your bait. Let's face it, none of our artificial baits are a 100% realistic. Swimbaits, jigs, worms might come close though.

Think about a jig. Does it really look like a crawfish? No it doesn't. Never seen a crawfish with a skirt. What matters is that a jig- through its profile and action- gives off enough illusions to fool a bass into thinking it's a crawfish.

If you're fishing for small bass, then some/most of the time color might not matter. They are aggressive enough anyway. No shame in admitting you fish for small bass. I do that maybe 25% of the time out on the water. Heck, people fish for bluegills, crappies, even stocked trout.

For larger bass, color DOES matter. Not sure how it works for plastics (still trying to figure that one out), but one thing I know- learnt it the hard way- if you fish jigs in my two reservoirs in the most popular color nationwide, your chances of catching a 3#+ fish goes way down.

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In reply to the post above, of course they can find any color in a body of water. Their multiple senses allow them to, but you can make it EASIER for the bass to find your lure.

Wouldn't you want the bass to have the best chance at locating your bait and having an accurate strike? I feel using colors like black in muddy water for example do just that.

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Color is on my list of things to pay attention to, but there's a lot more above it....location, profile, retrieve, fall rate, depth, etc...  I stick to a small collection of colors - mostly based on on what I like, not fish.  Rarely do I find it necessary to fine tune.  One example would be red baits on Oneida in spring and fall.  Don't have them, and you won't always do as well as someone that does.

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most baitfish and critters like Leeches, Crawfish and anything else that is an easy meal for fish, birds,or other larger predators will naturally develop a way of blending into surroundings whether it is sand, weeds,or mud etc..Ever catch a deep water bass compared to one that was in the same lake hiding in shallow weeds? They often look like 2 different fish.

 

As for color, we don't know what Bass see, but certain colors work better at certain times. I find when in doubt throw Green Pumpkin since it is never going to be overbearing or unnatural and I then mess around with red or candy flake....Green Pumpkin candy, Black and blue, Neon Black, and then a smoke silver flake will usually cover most situations, but solid black, pearl, and for some reason Metholinate can be colors that catch fire. Pumpkinseed is another color that I have seen really make a difference where I can say it was color and I think it was during the Panfish Hatch....Stick to Browns, Greens, Blacks, purple, and maybe a few with flash like green pumpkin gold, smoke silver, and you should be good. I never throw a bubblegum or Lime worm however I am guilty of carrying them all for the most part...I always start with a color that matches the water and backround and then pick a flake that is going to be most visable and most times it is Red or Purple, so GP candy is a great color for me.

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If you want to catch fish... you can catch them on MOST any color. If you want to catch the MOST fish... you will catch them on the RIGHT color ;)

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IMO

 

1. Color Matters

2. Beware of people telling you what colors work best, without taking the time to at least ask you a few questions about the body of water you are fishing.

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If you want to catch fish... you can catch them on MOST any color. If you want to catch the MOST fish... you will catch them on the RIGHT color ;)

+++1 nailed it!

Tom

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Natural colors are always a good choice and try to match what they are feeding on.

Fish don't actually change colors but shades can vary dramatically. I am not sure how long it takes them to change but I have pulled fish out of the darkness that are super black and that darkest of dark green. Or in light murky water I have seen them pale as a ghost with the faintest hint of very light green. That's something I never really seen come up on here but that can tell you a lot on where that fish has been living.

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