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retiredbosn

Life Expectancy Of An Outboard???

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Assuming that the owner keeps up with the maintenance and uses rather than abuses the motor: how long should an outboard last? I'm talking hours not seasons. Do you think that a four stroke is more durable than a 2 stroke? I understand that Honda four strokes utilize the same blocks as their cars. So as far as durability how many hours can u put on an outboard? Secondary question which is more durable 2 or 4 stroke?

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If properly maintained they will go or a long time.  My Optimax is almost 13 years old and has given me no problems.  It gets a thorough check up yearly by a certified tech and he does what ever is needed to keep it in good shape.

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Same as a persons expectancy.  Unknown.  Varies with what you do & how you feed it. 

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Same as a marriage. Depends on how well it is lubed. How often it is used and Who is using it. And whether you try to trade it up for a newer sleeker model.

However if maintained properly. If you give it the right amount of attention, doubt push it too the max too often it will be there when you die.

But who wants that traded in my last model last year.

Next year when I get everything paid off. I might be able to buy a boat again.

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There are some Hondas in service with the coast guard that are in the 15000-20000 hour range.

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I have seen relatively new engines blow that were properly maintained, and I have seen engines that you wonder what the owner was thinking regarding maintenance have well over 5 K HOURS (Tohatsu 140) ! So its tough to say, but I think if you maintain your engine you can't go wrong 2 or 4 stroke!  However, if I had to only choose one for ultimate dependability I think it would be a 4 stroke outboard Yamaha, Honda, or Suzuki.      

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Properly maintained and used, it can last a lifetime.  I have a buddy who still uses the original 1989 Mariner engine on his boat, and it runs great.  The key is routine maintenance.

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I had a friend the used five 225 to 250hp motors commercially.  He usually replaced his every three to four years, based on down time and repair cost, He wanted very little to none of both so when one or two started having problems, he swaps out all five.  His motors typically had about 2,000 or more hours on them when he swapped them out and had motors that never needed anything more than their routine maintenance during that whole time.  I haven't been in touch with him for a few years, but from 1998 until 2009, all he ran was Evinrudes and you could not give him any other motor.  Don't know what he as done since then because our paths don't cross anymore.  He may have changed over to four strokes now, that they are a lot better than what they were years back.  

 

Some of the numbers I'm seeing posted may be accurate, but they give me reason to wonder.  15 to 20K that's equivalent to two to three years of 24/7. 

Now, granted the more an engine is run at long intervals, the longer it will last because it's the heat up and cool down of an engine that causes the most wear.  Once they reach a stable temp, there is very little wear.  The families local grocery getter that most trips are only a few miles is not going to last anywhere near the miles as a vehicle that's driven long trips and run for hours at the time.

 

I worked as service tech on industrial equipment for about 15 years and had numbers of fork lifts that were run almost 24 seven on propane and were well maintained, and by 15,000 hours, there were not many engines had not been replaced or had major repairs done to them.  In commercial applications we used to base an engine with 100 hours as being equivalent to an automobile having 3,000 miles.

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Here's a thought regarding hours. 

 

There are at least two types of hour meters.  One is nothing more than a clock which begins recording time when the ignition is on.  It will record the same hours whether the motor is run at idle for two hours, or wide open for two hours.

 

The second is much like a speedometer (exactly like a speedometer).  It is cable driven off the engine.  The faster the engine turns, the higher the rpms it shows.  The hours are recorded exactly like miles are on an odometer.  In the case of this type, two engines that are run for the same number of "clock" hours at different rpms will not show the same hours of usage.  The "hours" of use are directly linked to the number of revolutions the engine has turned.

 

Neither of the above will give any reliable indication of how the engine was actually run.

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I fish out of a 1981 ranger with the original 80hp mercury. Still going strong.

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How many new 4 strokes will have ALL original parts 20 years from now ?

 

 2 strokes ?

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i believe that motors now a days are junk. and the bigger motors that pack more power and torque seem to blow up way more than smaller ones. i have a 1991 mariner 40 magnum and it runs great and to be honest i dont put much effort into its maintenance and never has a problem. and on my 19 foot stratos i run a 2007 175 etec. tho the performance is amazing on it, and i do everything possible to maintain it it still breaks down and needs fixing, nothing ever major. and i know so many guys with brand new mercury 150s, 200s, 250s that are only 2 years old that are completely blowing up on them. thank god for warranties i guess.

 

but its like anything else now a days. nothing is built to last any more. 

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How many new 4 strokes will have ALL original parts 20 years from now ?

I'll let ya know about mine in 10 years!

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I know personally that I have had mine since 1986 not always owned by me owned by my grandpa until 2006 then sat out in the weather and everything else until I got it last summer. Its a 1986 48 Evinrude 2 stroke. It has always been on the same boat and taken care of except for those few years it just sat. Like someone else says it like a humans life. If you take care of it it will last. Of course every manufacturer is gonna come out with a bad motor every once in a while but... It is what it is. I would recommend 4 stroke but 2 stroke is also a great option. 

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Maintenence is the key.If you REALLY plan to keep it a LONG time I would recommend the four stroke. two stroke technology will be legislated out of existence in a few years by EPA mandates and then two strokes will die a "no more parts" slow death. I honestly think that within ten years if you want to go look at a two stroke outboard you will need to visit a museum.

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Could you show us what part of the EPA future changes you know will KILL E Techs again ?

 

 

I know you know what you are saying since you are a sales manager for a boat dealer. But I still want you to show us how the Direct Injected 2 strokes are doomed.

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Properly maintained and used, it can last a lifetime.  I have a buddy who still uses the original 1989 Mariner engine on his boat, and it runs great.  The key is routine maintenance.

 

IIRC, the tag of my boat says its a 1977 boat, im pretty sure the motor is the original Johnson 85HP, and its still running...  

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2 stroke--4 cylinder oil injected 1991 Mercury 40 Hp electric start with power trim (check fluid levels).  Maintenance every year with lower oil change and gaskets, keep gas tank full during winter with stabilizer, take off prop and grease spline for storage, fog carbs or plugs and turn engine flywheel manually, run propylene glycol antifreeze (purple stuff for (-60F) thru it for storage, flush motor with clear water after each outing, --its 0 degree F. outside right now and garage is 20F--FYI.  I change NGK plugs often and impeller every 2-3 years.  Lubricate electrical, and metal linkages under cowl, wipe down outside of motor housing.  I stick with Mercury products-oil, gear oil, etc.  Original engine.  gets about only 25 hours per season due to my schedule.  Still has great compression in all cylinders.     Tighten engine bolts.  Do most myself.  no issues.  Hope this helps.

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