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For Those Who Use Backing...

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For those of you who use backing to defray the costs of higher-end line, how many uses do you get out of a 200 yd spool of high-end line?  Three @ ~65 yards each?  Four @ ~50 yards each?

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65 yards is enough for long casts without feeling the connecting knot.  

 

 

 

:winter-146:

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Not to partially change the subject, but how long do people use their flouro before respooling with new?  I probably have 12 trips on my line that I bought last Jan.  

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Not to partially change the subject, but how long do people use their flouro before respooling with new?  I probably have 12 trips on my line that I bought last Jan.  

I usually check the line to see if there is any issue with it and make a decision.  If it's ok then I see if there is enough line on the spool, would be my 2nd determining factor. 

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#3 for me and depending on the line size too.  I will respool when I get under 40 yards, this is dependent too on what lb test the line is and what I use it for.  IE if I'm flipping and pitching then I can get away with waiting a little longer.  If I'm launching crankbaits then I'd respool earlier. 

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I get 3 fill ups. I like knowing that even with some break offs and reties I'll still have plenty of line on my reel to get me through the season.

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Depends on the technique. A t-rig or weightless senko probably won't need more than 50 yards, because I'm usually casting those into specific spots. A lipless crank, or big crankbait, I may need 100 yards, because I have reels that can sling 'em. I don't have a specific method to my madness, I just know what I do for me. A cheap clip-on line counter is a good tool, because you know exactly how many feet you've put on, and you can use fairly simple math to determine how much of each line you'll need.

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It depends on the line.  If it is a baitcaster with 12lb, I get about 3 out of a spool of FC and spinning gear maybe 2 with 6lb.

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I've always wondered why people use backing at all. Doesn't the higher spool weight negatively impact casting to some degree? Why not just put less mainline on and call it a day? I realize this may sound stupid but I've never used backing before not has anyone really told me why it's such a good idea. I'd definitely appreciate some insight.

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Using backing allows you to fill the spool which keeps your IPT up in the higher end of the reels range. Otherwise, the reel won't retrieve as fast with a half full spool.

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Using backing allows you to fill the spool which keeps your IPT up in the higher end of the reels range. Otherwise, the reel won't retrieve as fast with a half full spool.

 

Correct.  It should also improve distance slightly.  Any time I am spooling expensive line or thin line, I use a cheap backing to save money.  Probably not saving much when using it as a backing for 6# mono, but don't see the need for 300 yards of line on a bass reel.  :teeth:

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I have always wondered why in the world reel manufactures design bass bait casters to hold so much line. Now you're seeing some with 165 yards capacity, but a lot of premium lines come in 150 yd spools. Go figure.

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To my knowledge I've never had a reel that I could put as much line on as the specs indicate, I believe those specs are to the top and I spool 1/8-1/4 from the lip.

I have backing on only 1 reel I use for bass, it does hold a lot of line but when I was re spooling didn't have enough braid on hand so I put backing on.

Otherwise I go straight braid without backing, when I do need to add line the remaining braid is my backing.  Only the initial spool up costs a little more.

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Using a 300 yd spool of braid. I can spool four reels (75 yards ea.) and depending on usage and proper rotation that spool will last two to three years. To answer the op, I will get eight to twelve uses when using backing.

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I have always wondered why in the world reel manufactures design bass bait casters to hold so much line. Now you're seeing some with 165 yards capacity, but a lot of premium lines come in 150 yd spools. Go figure.

 

Ever make an 80 yard cast with a large crankbait and have a musky/pike hit it in the first crank or two? If that fish wants to peel off 30 yards of drag and your spool only holds 100 yards, you're out of a potential $10-20 crankbait and another $10-30 worth of line. 

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Yes but why not just tie on the same amount of mainline you'd normally tie onto a backing right to the spool and forego the backing altogether? Wouldn't that in theory give you a lighter total spool and improve casting distance like a finesse spool would in relation to a normal one?

If that is wrong please tell me but explain. My mind is having trouble with the conflicting schools of thought. Is the backing "just in case" the fish peels out past your mainline end in an effort to stretch out a spool's worth of line?

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I'd like to witness an 80 yd cast with traditional bass baits & tackle...

 

 

oe

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Yes but why not just tie on the same amount of mainline you'd normally tie onto a backing right to the spool and forego the backing altogether? Wouldn't that in theory give you a lighter total spool and improve casting distance like a finesse spool would in relation to a normal one?

If that is wrong please tell me but explain. My mind is having trouble with the conflicting schools of thought. Is the backing "just in case" the fish peels out past your mainline end in an effort to stretch out a spool's worth of line?

The backing isn't so much just in case, as it is to create an arbor to ensure your spool is full; plus it saves you money on your more expensive mainline. If you have 20 yards of backing and 100 yards of mainline, and just skip the backing, your spool will be 20 yards short. Having a short-filled spool will affect casting distance, and it will greatly hurt your IPT as you near the spool. A heavier spool actually equals longer casts, because the extra weight keeps the spool spinning longer. The added weight only hurts startup inertia, which isn't an issue unless you're using lighter baits.

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The backing isn't so much just in case, as it is to create an arbor to ensure your spool is full; plus it saves you money on your more expensive mainline. If you have 20 yards of backing and 100 yards of mainline, and just skip the backing, your spool will be 20 yards short. Having a short-filled spool will affect casting distance, and it will greatly hurt your IPT as you near the spool. A heavier spool actually equals longer casts, because the extra weight keeps the spool spinning longer. The added weight only hurts startup inertia, which isn't an issue unless you're using lighter baits.

This makes sense, thanks!

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Ever make an 80 yard cast with a large crankbait and have a musky/pike hit it in the first crank or two? If that fish wants to peel off 30 yards of drag and your spool only holds 100 yards, you're out of a potential $10-20 crankbait and another $10-30 worth of line. 

No, I can't cast 80 yards with my bass rig, wish I could though. I just wish the reel manufactures and the line manufactures would settle on a standard "fill up" size. It's kind of like buying eight hot dog weiners and ten buns, or more often then not a reel with 170 yard line capacity and spools that come in 150 or 300 yards. Just barely not enough to get you there. It's frustrating. 

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The backing isn't so much just in case, as it is to create an arbor to ensure your spool is full; plus it saves you money on your more expensive mainline. If you have 20 yards of backing and 100 yards of mainline, and just skip the backing, your spool will be 20 yards short. Having a short-filled spool will affect casting distance, and it will greatly hurt your IPT as you near the spool. A heavier spool actually equals longer casts, because the extra weight keeps the spool spinning longer. The added weight only hurts startup inertia, which isn't an issue unless you're using lighter baits.

 

I think you are over-stating the importance of your position.  A full spool is only one factor in optimizing a cast and bait retrieve.  Please include consideration of spool capacity and diameter, reel retrieve speed, line diameter, bait weight and areodynamics, wind direction and velocity, rod length and action, as well as, angler skill. 

 

 

oe

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I only do it on my saltwater reels ... Braid last long enough for me that I don't feel the price of it unless in buying it at the moment lol .. I also take braid off spools and spool them on other reels I don't use ... Like I have a huge penn spinner with three different power pro sizes on it .. One being the frog line I use so since it's winter the same reel gets mono and a diff rod and does jerkbait work

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I think you are over-stating the importance of your position. A full spool is only one factor in optimizing a cast and bait retrieve. Please include consideration of spool capacity and diameter, reel retrieve speed, line diameter, bait weight and areodynamics, wind direction and velocity, rod length and action, as well as, angler skill.

oe

I didn't say anything about it being the only reason, or the most important thing. I simply said not having a full spool will affect distance and IPT. Both are facts and relevant to the thread. The other things you mentioned also have an effect.

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I've always wondered why people use backing at all. Doesn't the higher spool weight negatively impact casting to some degree? Why not just put less mainline on and call it a day? I realize this may sound stupid but I've never used backing before not has anyone really told me why it's such a good idea. I'd definitely appreciate some insight.

According to A Mart, certain backing will decrease spool weight, and thus increase the speed the spool spins and casting distance.

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