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Matthew Caldwell

Hooksets While Flipping

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just moved to florida and new to flipping. i fished a tournament last month and had 6 bites while flipping but missed all of them. I've already upgraded to 50lb braid, and using heavy duty flipping hooks tied with a snell knot. the bites i missed were all pretty noticeable. Big hits where the rod would bend over. I would then set the hook as soon as i felt the bite but nothing was there. My question is am I setting the hook too soon. Should I wait for a 2nd tick then set the hook? what other suggestions would you make? thanks guys

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Hello and Welcome to Bass Resource -

 

Sounds like you were doing everything right.

 

Perhaps your down fall was fishing with this guy  . . . .

 

:eyebrows:

 

A-Jay

 

https://www.facebook.com/ThatsGuyHumor/videos/430112597170244/?pnref=story

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What exact hook? If the fish strike is pulling your rod, I can't imagine you missing 6 fish unless you are fishing with no hook..

I don't believe this is a case of to soon on a hook set.. What line were you using before you up graded? ( what # )

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I'd stick with the first tick and try say'in "Gotcha" on the set.

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Welcome to the forum Matt.

 

Should you wait for a 2nd tick?   Perish the thought!

When you retrieve your lure, check to see if the hook-point has indeed busted thru the plastic trailer.

If not, you might need more hair on the hookset. On the other hand, if the hook-point lies well outside the trailer,

I'd continue the same hook-set, and you're bound to experience a reversal in fortune.      Good Luck.

 

Roger

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Most people set the hook extremely hard while flipping. Try reeling down then lifting. The fish will pull back and will hook itself.

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I used to have trouble fishing with a texas-rig or burying the hook with a flippin hook. Reeling down, feeling the weight of the fish, and firmly setting the hook seemed to work for me. Are you fishing with at least a MH rod?

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Gotta give the big ones the business with the hook sets....

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Here's your answer:

 

https://youtu.be/3iCpD2uiTw8

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What you are describing is ver similar to what I've had happen dozens of times but only when fishing deep water with T-rig or Jigs.

It happens after the lure sat for a while & with no tap or anything something would slam it nearly taking the rod out of my hands. I've had them take my rod all the way down to the gunnels of the boat before I could react; I would set hook thinking no way I could miss but come up empty handed.

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I haven't been flipping all that long but I've noticed I lose a lot more fish and don't get as good of a hook set if I don't set the hook straight up vertically... It seems that if I try to set the hook more diagonally it doesn't work nearly as good

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I haven't been flipping all that long but I've noticed I lose a lot more fish and don't get as good of a hook set if I don't set the hook straight up vertically... It seems that if I try to set the hook more diagonally it doesn't work nearly as good

 

I agree with your observation C&G, and will attempt to explain the reasoning behind it.

What used to be called an LOP style is a hook whose line-eyelet & hook-point are on the same line (LOP = line-of-pull)

Once the hook-point starts to penetrate, an LOP style hook requires less hook-set pressure to drive the hook

beyond the barb. Nevertheless, an LOP hook is also the style most likely to skate over membrane

without initializing penetration (a circle hook exaggerates this tendency).

 

After a 60 ft cast in 4 ft of water, a straight-up hook-set is far from vertical, but still has a better attack angle

on the upper jaw than a sidewise sweep. In this case, it's important to pierce membrane to start penetration,

otherwise an LOP style hook never gets a chance to strut its stuff. The best hook configuration for initializing

penetration is a round-bend hook with a hook-point aimed slightly 'outside' the line-eye. For this same reason,

many anglers use needle-nose pliers to bend the hook-point slightly outward (only necessary with points in the line-of-pull).

 

Roger

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Set immediately and pull em out. The trick is when puuling em out not too hard though or you may pull the theough the mouth.

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I like to keep a little slack in the line so they can inhale the bait without feeling tension from a taught line, then set the hook immediately when I feel the thump.

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Suggestions to consider when flipping and pitching:

1. Use a rod that is specific to flipping and pitching so you will have the necessary tip action to set the hook. Some guys like rods over 7'6" while others go for rods with less length. Your preference.

2. Always watch your line. After the taps the bass will "walk off" with your bait. Give him a few seconds and then set the hook hard over your head.

3. Ditch braid and go with fluorocarbon line. You need a little stretch in the line when flipping and pitching for good hook sets and flouro is more abrasive resistant than braid when you flip and pitch into structure. Braid is great for grass and pads but it does get torn up in wood and rock.

4. Use the lowest test you can based on your rod and reel's parameters and the size of the bass you will be catching. 12 pound flouro on a baitcaster and 8 pound flouro on a spinning reel should be sufficient unless you are catching those over 3 pounds in structure. Try Yo-Zuri and see if you like it for flipping and pitching.

5. Always check your line after 10 or so casts to note any nicks, cuts, abrasions, etc. Cut out damaged line and retie. If you are fishing in a lot of structure you may want to upgrade to an abrasive resistant line.

6. Always check your hook's knot after two or three fish. Retie if necessary. Knot failure while flipping and pitching is not unusual.

7. Try to flip and pitch with a spinning rig. You can keep one finger on the line at all times and the lighter you can go with your rod, reel, line and bait the more successful you will be.

8. Use a good "jig head" for your trick worms, brush hogs, lizards, beavers, etc. You need a strong jig head with at least a 3/0 hook.

9. If possible, flip and pitch a Senko type bait unweighted. Go with the "wacky rig" set up. Excellent for pitching and flipping. Downsize the hook to a #1 or 1/0 when flipping and pitching a wacky stick bait.

10. Bring an extra reel so that you can change out if you take off a lot of line from the original reel on your rod.

 

Just remember to watch your line. Any movement or non-movement can mean the bass has taken your bait and he may be swimming towards you. When in doubt set that hook!

 

And always be cognizant of your bait when you cast. Bass have been known to suck in your bait on the way down and just sit there with it in their mouths. Once again, if the moves or does not move and if the bait feels "different" you SET THE HOOK.

 

Welcome to the Forum.

 

One last note: every time you move your rod tip one-inch your bait will move six-inches. So understand that when flipping and pitching you want the bait to sit there and allow only our hand shaking to move the bait. You can then hop it back to you or swim it back or drag it back or pull it up and flip it again or do whatever you want to get the bass' attention.

 

 

Good luck and have some fun pitching and flipping.

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A couple of things that made me lose fish.  I know about crossing their eyes on the hookset when you feel the bite.  What happened to me was I had rigged up a medium action rod that was too soft for a really hard hookset.  And, I had bought some monster hooks (maybe 7/0, don't know because they did not have the size on the lable, only Monster Hooks).  I don't remember the brand.  I checked the point, after the fact, and found they were dull, about like the end of a ball point pen.  Rerigged on a medium heavy rod and sharpened the hooks.  Next hit I got the hook in the fish, but the lily pads were thick and it wrapped me up in a bunch and tore itself off the hook.

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Suggestions to consider when flipping and pitching:

1. Use a rod that is specific to flipping and pitching so you will have the necessary tip action to set the hook. Some guys like rods over 7'6" while others go for rods with less length. Your preference.

2. Always watch your line. After the taps the bass will "walk off" with your bait. Give him a few seconds and then set the hook hard over your head.

3. Ditch braid and go with fluorocarbon line. You need a little stretch in the line when flipping and pitching for good hook sets and flouro is more abrasive resistant than braid when you flip and pitch into structure. Braid is great for grass and pads but it does get torn up in wood and rock.

4. Use the lowest test you can based on your rod and reel's parameters and the size of the bass you will be catching. 12 pound flouro on a baitcaster and 8 pound flouro on a spinning reel should be sufficient unless you are catching those over 3 pounds in structure. Try Yo-Zuri and see if you like it for flipping and pitching.

5. Always check your line after 10 or so casts to note any nicks, cuts, abrasions, etc. Cut out damaged line and retie. If you are fishing in a lot of structure you may want to upgrade to an abrasive resistant line.

6. Always check your hook's knot after two or three fish. Retie if necessary. Knot failure while flipping and pitching is not unusual.

7. Try to flip and pitch with a spinning rig. You can keep one finger on the line at all times and the lighter you can go with your rod, reel, line and bait the more successful you will be.

8. Use a good "jig head" for your trick worms, brush hogs, lizards, beavers, etc. You need a strong jig head with at least a 3/0 hook.

9. If possible, flip and pitch a Senko type bait unweighted. Go with the "wacky rig" set up. Excellent for pitching and flipping. Downsize the hook to a #1 or 1/0 when flipping and pitching a wacky stick bait.

10. Bring an extra reel so that you can change out if you take off a lot of line from the original reel on your rod.

 

Just remember to watch your line. Any movement or non-movement can mean the bass has taken your bait and he may be swimming towards you. When in doubt set that hook!

 

And always be cognizant of your bait when you cast. Bass have been known to suck in your bait on the way down and just sit there with it in their mouths. Once again, if the moves or does not move and if the bait feels "different" you SET THE HOOK.

 

Welcome to the Forum.

 

One last note: every time you move your rod tip one-inch your bait will move six-inches. So understand that when flipping and pitching you want the bait to sit there and allow only our hand shaking to move the bait. You can then hop it back to you or swim it back or drag it back or pull it up and flip it again or do whatever you want to get the bass' attention.

 

Good luck and have some fun pitching and flipping.

Now THAT is good reading no matter what your experience level is!

Excellent!

Mike

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Some days it aint the equipment

Some days it aint the hook set technique

Some days it aint the angler

Some days the bass win ;)

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I'll add one thought; There is a possibility your bites weren't from bass. Bluegill and crappie can grab the tail of your bait and turn/run with it hard enough that you'd swear it was a 'nice' bass that grabbed the bait, especially when bluegill are nesting.  I'd keep doing what you were doing and only change something if the problem persists under multiple situations.

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Florida - I never had much time  to do anything but really set the hook - 8' hvy flipping rod - 65# braid - when I missed it was usually because they had already dropped the lure - of course  I am old.

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Most people set the hook extremely hard while flipping. Try reeling down then lifting. The fish will pull back and will hook itself.

This..... If you are really cracking them good on the hookset you will often pop there mouths open with the sinker causing missed hook ups. The bigger the weight I use the more I use the "lift and lean into them" type of hook set instead of really swinging hard.

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What I've noticed with creature baits the spots will just hit it to kill it and will pick it up with 3-4 seconds and swim off with it so I wait to see if the lines moving.

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OP- Are you asking about punching mats with tungsten. .... or just general flipping?

I ask this because here in Florida, the term " flipping" is often used to mean " punching". The problem with that is that you get fabulous flipping advice like above- that is completely useless to you when punching mats.

I see that you said you have switched to 50# braid and snelling your hook- so I am going to assume you mean punching.

In that case. .... I agree with the " lean into them" method mentioned above. I found that a properly rigged, sharp flipping hook snelled on braid does alot of the work for you. I tend to feel the bite, and reel into the fish. When the fish reacts, lean back into them hard. Don't " snap set" like you might do a t-rig. .. ( I don't do it then either) .

Just solid forceful contact and let your equipment do the work its designed to do.

Ill also add that punching is alot like frogging- your hook up ratio well never be super high. Many times the bass just swipe at the falling bait like a cat does, and it never goes in their mouth.

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If they are pretty close and you don't have a lot of line out trying to catapult the fish out of the water on a hookset ends bad usually. Well for me it seems to. Your asking for no fish and a tungsten weight flying back at you or your buddies head. I just pick up on them and pretty much get them all. Just like you would maybe with a dropshot but with my authority. Even with kinda dull hooks you should stick them. It don't take much with little line out and braid.

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