Jump to content
Fuese54

How To Keep Fish To Eat

Recommended Posts

What do you do after catching a fish to take it home and clean/eat it? Also how do you "bleed" a fish and does it make it taste better?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't keep bass but for species I do keep I just throw them on ice and clean them at home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the moment you catch them, what steps do you take to get the fish home to clean and eat?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just make sure to put them on ice, or keep alive on a stringer/livewell until your ready to fillet or clean them. Don't want your catch to spoil before you get home

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why would he be better off buying fish from the store?

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you do after catching a fish to take it home and clean/eat it? Also how do you "bleed" a fish and does it make it taste better?

To bleed a fish you cut the tail off and hang it to bleed while it's alive. I'd much rather give them a quick knock on the head, and soak the fillets in salt water later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I often have bass on a stringer when fishing from a john boat. They can be on there for hours and are in good shape when I'm done fishing even in the summer. The constant water flowing through  the gills keep them oxygenated.  I fillet them at the lake , throw the fillets in an empty  ice bag and cooler , then rinse and put in the fridge too eat the next day . I love those slot limits .

 

09-15-14006.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you do after catching a fish to take it home and clean/eat it? Also how do you "bleed" a fish and does it make it taste better?

 

Almost all of the fish I catch that are going to end up on the dinner table are put into a cooler with ice water.  Putting them in a livewell or stringer is fine so long as they stay alive, but if any die before you leave, those fish are being stored at whatever the water's temperature happens to be.  In the summer, that might not be that good.  Another benefit to icing your fish is that most species are easier to fillet when they are somewhat stiff.

 

The only fish that I normally bleed out are large trout and salmon species.  The easiest way I've found to do this is to cut between the lower gill plates.  Note - make sure that this cut doesn't alter the fish's length if that is an issue where you're fishing.

 

In answer to your other post, I fillet all of the fish I plan to eat.  Other than bluegills or yellow perch, the others are also skinned unless the rules require that a patch of skin is left intact to determine species (Think Ontario).  When the skin stays on, I remove the scales first and then fillet.  Everything else is filleted and then I remove the skin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't "bleed" them. I just try to either keep them alive or on ice until I get home. Stringer, livewell or cooler. You can leave them overnight on ice if it's too late. Then I fillet them and they go into a freezer bag and in the fridge. If, after a day I haven't used them, they go into the freezer.

 

My friend soaks them in a little brine overnight. But that's all I do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why would he be better off buying fish from the store?

Some folks at uber sensitive about eating bass others feels buying your meal makes more sense. But nothing and I mean nothing compares to fresh food, ever. Caught and eaten with in hours taste amazing vs. frozen then defrosted and then eaten food. 

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the amount of time you have to put in, you're better off buying grocery store fish

Get an electric knife and get some practice with it. It'll go fast.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you make a fishing trip to Florida, don't put your fish on a stringer.  That's a buffet for the local alligator.  Depending on how strong your stringer is, that can be quite a problem.  And, yes, I see it often enough for it to be mentioned.  

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Up here, if you cut their tail off, you'll have trouble with the DEC. Altering the length is not kosher. If you want to bleed them, you sever the artery behind the gill plate. Look up gilling trout or salmon. Otherwise, and ice chest works fine. So does letting them go.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

make sure you keep them alive, hit them on the head then gut them then fillet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's easiest to keep them alive in the livewell. That's now against the law here so you are supposed to put them on ice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the amount of time you have to put in, you're better off buying grocery store fish

 

Fresh-caught fish is the real deal, and well worth a few minutes of filleting time.

 

In order to inflate profit margins, a high percentage of store-bought fish is farmed-raised.

Many studies have found that farmed fish generally contain significantly less omega 3s

and have a higher inflammatory value. These bad boys are linked to diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease.

 

Roger

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I keep them happy in the live well and fillet them when I get home. Some go in the fryer and the ones that don't go in vacuum bag. Surprising how fresh the taste even months later. Any other way of freezing that I've tried had poor results.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fresh-caught fish is the real deal, and well worth a few minutes of filleting time.

 

In order to inflate profit margins, a high percentage of store-bought fish is farmed-raised.

Many studies have found that farmed fish generally contain significantly less omega 3s

and have a higher inflammatory value. These bad boys are linked to diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease.

 

Roger

Filleting is quick, finding the fish is what takes time.

I don't like dog food grade fed farm fish, that includes stocked trout. Wild fish could be even worse, look at the susky, pretty much bags of mercury swimming around with cancer sores on them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Filleting is quick, finding the fish is what takes time.

I don't like dog food grade fed farm fish, that includes stocked trout. Wild fish could be even worse, look at the susky, pretty much bags of mercury swimming around with cancer sores on them.

 

If that were true, then store-bought fish that is not farm-raised, would be the same bags of mercury with cancer sores.

 

Roger

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't keep LM/SM bass, not in about 15 years anyway. Not sure why, I think I just value them more in the lake than on my plate.

 

I do keep pumpkinseed and rockbass which are absolutely teeming on my lake. I store them with a 15' length of #18 bankline as a stringer. http://oi58.tinypic.com/rbxldx.jpgCut a small slit in the bottom jaw, thread fish on the line, tie knot around the jaw and let them just hang out under the boat.

 

My rule of thumb is don't keep anything that you can't catch 10+ of in an hour. First off you might not catch enough to feed everyone, and second it probably means their population #s aren't very strong.

 

Did someone say grocery store fish? :puke_blue:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't keep LM/SM bass, not in about 15 years anyway. Not sure why, I think I just value them more in the lake than on my plate.

 

I do keep pumpkinseed and rockbass which are absolutely teeming on my lake. I store them with a 15' length of #18 bankline as a stringer. http://oi58.tinypic.com/rbxldx.jpgCut a small slit in the bottom jaw, thread fish on the line, tie knot around the jaw and let them just hang out under the boat.

 

My rule of thumb is don't keep anything that you can't catch 10+ of in an hour. First off you might not catch enough to feed everyone, and second it probably means their population #s aren't very strong.

 

Did someone say grocery store fish? :puke_blue:

So you keep 9 fish on a stringer and if you don't catch the 10th you throw them all back? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I normally do not like to keep fish unless I have to. When I do have to I clean them immediately and put them on ice and fillet them once I get home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So you keep 9 fish on a stringer and if you don't catch the 10th you throw them all back? 

No, not really what I meant. I don't think I've ever kept 10 fish. Just 5 is fine for myself and wife. I don't start keeping them unless I'm already catching them at a good rate... a couple within a few mins for example. Don't need to actually get 10 in an hour.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×