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freelancer27

How Do You Take Care Of Your Reels?

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Hi guys,
HAPPY THANKSGIVING!


I finally made the purchase of some really nice reels from Lew's. To enjoy my investment as long as good as possible, I was wondering if some people could get me their 2cents on how they take care of their reels (baitcaster and also spinning)?

I was thinking that there are three steps that make a reel last long:

1. Prep reparation before going fishing

Are there any things that you do?


2. During fishing
 

 If water gets on it, dry it. Dont smack your reel and rod when the 10 pounder got off. ;)


3. After the fishing

Clean it, dry it.

How often do you oil and greeze your reels? What products can you recommend here? Any experience with the products from Ardent (Ardent 3-Step Care Pack)?


THanks.

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Well as for myself, I keep my reels clean, line guide free of debris and build up, And wiped down so guess that would be before.

 

During:  I'm fishing so not thinking about cleaning or wiping them down if they get wet....it's a reel it's going to get wet, just keep it out of the dirt when you're fishing.

 

After, if needed a light rinse (if fished in saltwater) otherwise I may wipe it down.

 

Once a month or so, a drop of oil on the bearings and a light wipe down.  Clean the light guide with a Q-tip to clear and clean any build up on it.  And lightly grease the worm gear on the level wind as needed.  I don't get too carried away and break down the whole reel.  If I'm going to get that deep into it or it's got issues, then it's going to the shop for a cleaning/repair of whatever the issue may be.  

 

Only reels I will break down are my old Newells and a Penn 4/0 that I've owned for 25+ years.  

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Reels should be deep cleaned periodically. I start at annually, and adjust according to use and if symptoms appear. In between the best thing you can do is keep them free of visible debris, dry before storing and oil accessible spots that appear dry.

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You should break the rod over your knee and throw the combo into the lake like Bobby Lane does when angry!

Treat the reels like the investment they are and they will last a very long time. If they need service, send them to DVT at the end of each season. Light maintenance like oiling spool bearings, level wind worm gear and keeping the reel clean of obvious debris, pollens, water scum etc. Look into getting reel covers. Using rod sleeves and laying rod-reel combo between terry towels in the rod locker helps to cushion them and saves wear rash when traveling.

Tom

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1. I make sure they are in the boat

 

2. Reels will get wet. It's inevitable. You're fishing in water....and if you get rained on they all get wet on the deck of the boat. Don't drop them in the drink and they will be fine. 

 

3. I put a reel cover on each one and put them back in the locker. 

 

Once a year I clean them for the most part during the winter when I can't fish. I break them all down and deep clean every part and polish certain things. I do this twice a year (once during mid summer on top of the annual winter) to my frog and punching reels due to the amount of crap that just gets built up on the reel. I like Daiwa Blue oil/Rem Gun oil/Boca Lightning for oils. Penn reel grease and/or SuperLube for grease. I'm not a fan of the Ardent cleaning kit and wouldn't recommend it. 

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Turn down the drag after each use, or if you're planning on not using it for an extended period of time.

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1. I make sure they are in the boat

 

2. Reels will get wet. It's inevitable. You're fishing in water....and if you get rained on they all get wet on the deck of the boat. Don't drop them in the drink and they will be fine. 

 

3. I put a reel cover on each one and put them back in the locker. 

 

Once a year I clean them for the most part during the winter when I can't fish. I break them all down and deep clean every part and polish certain things. I do this twice a year (once during mid summer on top of the annual winter) to my frog and punching reels due to the amount of crap that just gets built up on the reel. I like Daiwa Blue oil/Rem Gun oil/Boca Lightning for oils. Penn reel grease and/or SuperLube for grease. I'm not a fan of the Ardent cleaning kit and wouldn't recommend it. 

Reason for this comment? I'm not a user of Ardent but would not be opposed unless there was good reason. Care to share??

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Reason for this comment? I'm not a user of Ardent but would not be opposed unless there was good reason. Care to share??

 

The "cleaning spray" is a gimmick and a waste of money. A "magical spray" isn't a substitute for elbow grease and a toothbrush. Soaking Bearings and your hard metals (main gear, pinion, levelwind-never plastic) in Acetone and everything else in hot soapy water will clean everything in your reel perfectly with a toothbrush. 

 

The grease will suffice but it's quality I felt was lacking. It's longevity was questionable and it got "tacky" the few times I used it. Penn reel grease and SuperLube are the same price are, in my experience, a much better quality lubricant. 

 

I use quality bearings. I put quality oil in them. Each oil serves a different purpose. REM oil goes in abec 7 ceramics due to its low viscosity. Boca lightning goes in non ceramic spool bearings. Daiwa blue goes in/on anything else that requires oiling. 

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Before fishing: SET THE DRAG, check the line for nicks and kinks, a quick once over to make sure everything is working properly. 

During fishing: Wipe off any dirt, especially in the line guide.

After fishing; Loosen the drag, wipe down and put a drop of oil (never grease) on the worm gear.

 

At least once a year: Tear down, clean thoroughly, grease the drive train, oil the bearings (more often on reels that see heavy use), replace any worn parts and put them away (in Crown Royal bags) until net season.

 

Do this religiously and your reels should serve you faithfully for many years.

 

Tom

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Each winter, I box them all up - and send them on a little vacation . . .

 

They all get to visit their friend Mike at DVT

 

And you know when they come back - they really do seem refreshed.

 

They definitely work better that's for sure.

 

:) 

 

A-Jay

 

http://www.delawarevalleytackle.com/

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Before I hit the water I check my spinning reel handles for tightness, check the drag, and visually inspect all reels to make sure they're up to snuff.  I once lost a side cover to a *** because I didn't lock it down after adjusting it.  

 

I don't sweat getting reels wet.  They're built for it.  I'll rinse them off with tap water if I fish salt water, then blow them dry with compressed air.

 

After fishing, I wipe them down with a dry towel.  

 

I clean and maintain my spinning reels myself.  My baitcasters, when new, go to Mike @ Delaware Valley Tackle for a thorough factory de-mucking, supertune, and any upgrade deemed a good value.  After that, I disassemble and clean them myself.

 

All my reels are stored and transported with neoprene covers.

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In the winter they get broken down and cleaned up good. During the summer the get oil and grease as needed. If I am going to be walking the bank I try to prop up the rod so the reel is not on the ground.

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I break them down once a year, but intend to send them to DVT this winter.

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Fishing reels are toys.  You should play nice with your toys and not tear them up unnecessarily.  Every so often you are going to break or wear out a toy.   Fix it yourself or send it in or put it on the shelf and get a new toy.  Your choice.

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Great responses!

Do you have any recommendations in regards to oil, greece etc?

I have two Lew's baitcaster and a Pflueger Spinning reel if that is important for that choice.

Thanks guys!

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Great responses!

Do you have any recommendations in regards to oil, greece etc?

I have two Lew's baitcaster and a Pflueger Spinning reel if that is important for that choice.

Thanks guys!

 

From a bunch of research it seems like a lot of people like Cal's drag grease for drags and bearings, CorrosionX for most general purpose lubrication, and 80W gear oil for the level wind. Acetone or lighter fluid for cleaning bearings, and Simple Green for cleaning dirt on frames.

I'm planning on trying all this stuff for the first time this winter (finally have some reels worth taking care of), so I'm interested in this question as well.

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Don't: Step on it; Sit on it; Knock it overboard.

 

Do: Have it professionally serviced at the end of each season; keep in house; take all pressure off drag and spool; remove all line.

 

Congrats on your purchase.

 

May you have many years of wonderful fishing with it.

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All I have used for decades is CLP Break Free lubricant, 2 oz bottle lasts a very long time. Wipe the reel off using a micro cloth sprayed with LPS greaseless lubricant after fishing all day and put a drop of CLP on the level wind gear and spool bearings as needed. At the end of each year the reels that need it, get professionally tuned and cleaned. I clean reel parts I feel comfortable working on.

Tom

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I learned the hard way to keep a reel cover on at all times the reel isn't being used.  My near mint Chronarch 101A is no longer near mint.  :cry3:

 

When fishing in a boat, I will leave the covers off as long as the boat is anchored or just letting the wind push it around.  Whenever we move to another spot they get the covers back on.

 

 

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I learned the hard way to keep a reel cover on at all times the reel isn't being used.  My near mint Chronarch 101A is no longer near mint.  :cry3:

 

When fishing in a boat, I will leave the covers off as long as the boat is anchored or just letting the wind push it around.  Whenever we move to another spot they get the covers back on.

The only time mine aren't covered is when they're in my hands. As I'm picking one up the covers coming off and going on the one I'm putting down. I've been doing it for so long it's like second nature now. I have reels that are fished 5x's a week for the last 5+ years that still look new. I get ribbed by the guys I fish with, but when I can sell a 50E for more than I paid for it after 5 years I win. Brian.

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New line every spring.

Check the line after every trip for abrasions. Remove about 20ft or more till no rough areas are felt.

During each outing as bass in numbers or bigger bass are caught retie your knot. Retie before every outing.

Check the amount of line on the spool often. Before it affects your casting distance. Don't hesitate to respool new line.

Some places we fish the water for some reason the harsh water, structure or rocks makes the line rough. It eats line check it and respool as needed.

Halfway through the season respool.

After every trip wipe the reel and rod down.

After every season, remove the old line, disassemble the reel, clean it, inspect it for wear, relube it. Wipe the rod down check it for wear.

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So, you guys are doing the worm gear with oil and not having any issues?  I know when you buy a reel its overloaded with grease on the worm. 

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I use my fluoro for more than one season, but just refresh it with some KVD.  I have not had any issues. 

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I swear by Kano Microil.

 

All of the Kroil products are fantastic, and no, I don't work for them!

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