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Thoughts on Casting Rigs vs Spinning

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I've only been bass fishing about a year, and I have only used spinning gear. I've tried casting rigs and have failed because I get aggravated with backlashes and just put them aside and keep fishing. I feel like I can do anything and everything with spinning. Although I've been pretty successful so far, as I get more into bass fishing (I've fished a couple of tournaments and looking to do more), am I missing out on possibly catching more fish because I'm only using spinning rigs? I've looked into trying a baitcaster, but when I'm about to get one I talk myself out of it and just keep thinking I'm doing fine without them. Just don't want to miss out on fish because I'm slightly impatient when it comes to learning how to use one. Thanks for any advice everyone!

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You can get by with just one or the other but personally mastering different tackle types opens options and enhances the overall experience. If / when you give casting another shot post and you'll get lots of tips for success 

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What bait casters have you used or are you currently trying to use? Cheap reals can be frustrating to learn. There are lots of good choices both new and used that are pretty user friendly for around $100. Lots has been written here and there are several articles on how to setup your bait caster as well as several tips and tricks like making a cast, pulling extra line out, then placing a small piece of tape right there to prevent future backlashes from going further than that point. I would look for a used Shimano Citica E or G as they utilize the VBS system which is pretty user friendly and can be found for well under $100.

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Using a baitcaster is sort of like driving a manual transmission, lots of people go threw their whole life without learning it and that's OK.  Eventually once you learn it you just do it without even thinking about it. In some situations it is more efficient.  In other situations it can be cumbersome.  One thing is for sure you will always look cooler driving a stick or fishing a baitcaster.

 

Tyler

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32 minutes ago, kickerfish1 said:

What bait casters have you used or are you currently trying to use? Cheap reals can be frustrating to learn. There are lots of good choices both new and used that are pretty user friendly for around $100. Lots has been written here and there are several articles on how to setup your bait caster as well as several tips and tricks like making a cast, pulling extra line out, then placing a small piece of tape right there to prevent future backlashes from going further than that point. I would look for a used Shimano Citica E or G as they utilize the VBS system which is pretty user friendly and can be found for well under $100.

Previously I've only tried the cheaper Academy/BPS reels. Now that I'm more serious about it and already spending more than I used to for my spinning rigs, I was looking to invest more into something better to learn with. I'm somewhat biased when it comes to what I will use, and all of my spinning rigs are either Daiwa or Lew's products, but I am starting to shy away from Lew's. I feel like their newer models just aren't the same as the stuff they were coming out with a few years ago. I was a saltwater guide specializing in speckled trout in south Louisiana and still fish for trout on occasion, and all the gear I used was always technically considered bass gear. I like using light tackle lol. But I've been looking at either the Daiwa Fuego or Tatula. Any thoughts on either of these? I don't mind spending money on fishing gear, but I was hoping to keep this combo around 300 to keep the wife off my back lol

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Thanks for the clarification. I too am a bit brand loyal for reels and only run Daiwa/Shimano. The Tatula is a VERY good reel and can be found for just a bit over $100 on EBAY. I purchased mine in mint condition here for about $75. The reel is extremely user friendly and nearly impossible to backlash even when trying to put a bit of something extra behind the cast. It is also very good when casting into the wind. The drag is smooth and strong the retrieve is smooth and powerful. Just make sure the frame of the reel is comfortable in your hands as it is a bit larger than other casting reels.

The Tatula CT should be a bit more compact and more palmable. Would also be worth a look but I have not used the CT version.

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As far as rods go, I don't feel a difference in castability between a M and a MH dealing with spinning rods, so I'm not sure how much difference that will make while in trying to learn. Guess I don't notice it too much with a spinning reel bc if I wanna cast far I just whip it and throw it as hard and as fast as possible lol

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There is a lot of pressure to do what the pros do
or use what the pros use. In reality, you can accomplish
what you need to accomplish with spinning gear.

Tournaments? Here's an FLW pro who uses only
spinning gear. It can be done.

http://www.flwfishing.com/tips/2014-04-22-going-big-with-a-spinning-rod

If you are comfortable with it and efficient with it,
use it. You aren't less of a fisherman because you
don't have a bait caster.

If you want to learn bait casting, fine, then do so.
I did, and I'm glad I did, but I'll be very honest, 
these days I'm using my spinning gear more than
casting gear. I've even reduced my casting gear to
one reel, two rods of different action.

So contrary to some who take multiple casting rods
and a single spinning rod out, I do the opposite now.

Don't sell your abilities to fish short by being "stuck"
with spinning gear....

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4 hours ago, cgerstnerjr said:

I've only been bass fishing about a year, and I have only used spinning gear. I've tried casting rigs and have failed because I get aggravated with backlashes and just put them aside and keep fishing. I feel like I can do anything and everything with spinning. Although I've been pretty successful so far, as I get more into bass fishing (I've fished a couple of tournaments and looking to do more), am I missing out on possibly catching more fish because I'm only using spinning rigs? I've looked into trying a baitcaster, but when I'm about to get one I talk myself out of it and just keep thinking I'm doing fine without them. Just don't want to miss out on fish because I'm slightly impatient when it comes to learning how to use one. Thanks for any advice everyone!

Bud get yourself a Daiwa Tatula casting reel MSRP $150 for around $94 on Ebay and don't look back. Those things are so smooth. I've mainly fished spinning gear my whole also but it makes a huge difference when you get a decent casting reel. The $59.99 reels aren't the same. I'm kicking myself for not getting decent casting reel prior to this year. It's just so much easier to fish once you get the hang of it.

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You can get by with spinning only. But learning to use casting gear will enhance the level of fun you can have. I personally prefer casting gear for fishing heavier cover and high resistance lures. If you are going to learn to use casting gear, use a QUALITY setup and set the breaks and cast controls high until you educate your thumb. Then you can back off as gain experience. Also, if you've been using spinning gear for a long time, consider whether you would like a left or right hand retrieve reel. I'm right handed but was so accustomed to reeling with my left hand that learning casting gear on a right handed reel really threw me off. I traded my righty for a lefty while learning and it really made it ALOT easier for me. I've stuck with this ever since. 

5 hours ago, cgerstnerjr said:

I've only been bass fishing about a year, and I have only used spinning gear. I've tried casting rigs and have failed because I get aggravated with backlashes and just put them aside and keep fishing. I feel like I can do anything and everything with spinning. Although I've been pretty successful so far, as I get more into bass fishing (I've fished a couple of tournaments and looking to do more), am I missing out on possibly catching more fish because I'm only using spinning rigs? I've looked into trying a baitcaster, but when I'm about to get one I talk myself out of it and just keep thinking I'm doing fine without them. Just don't want to miss out on fish because I'm slightly impatient when it comes to learning how to use one. Thanks for any advice everyone!

Also, I don't think you are missing out on fish as long as you can flip pitch cover with your spinning gear. This is why I got into casting gear. I was flipping cover with  a 4000 sized reel and a pool cue. Lol. It wore me out. Casting gear was more comfortable for me. 

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14 hours ago, cgerstnerjr said:

As far as rods go, I don't feel a difference in castability between a M and a MH dealing with spinning rods, so I'm not sure how much difference that will make while in trying to learn. Guess I don't notice it too much with a spinning reel bc if I wanna cast far I just whip it and throw it as hard and as fast as possible lol

Your statement here is the biggest hurdle anglers have to overcome when going from spinning to casting and it is something that is never talked about. The rod difference, with casting gear the choice of M and MH is critical, you need to make sure your within the line and lure limits for the rod. The other thing is the whip cast you described, that will cause you a lot of problems, casting reels don't like whip casting, it is a smooth forward motion which can be overhand, side arm, or even underhand but it needs to be smooth. Good luck with your decision but if you have heavy enough spinning rods for what you use then you'll be ok but certain techniques are better with casting gear.

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I realize in NOLA you probably don't have this but I taught myself to use a BC in winter when the snow was flying and the water was hard.  I was glad I did.  I taught myself on a BPS Pro Qualifier.  I can't imagine a better reel to learn on because of the Dual Braking System...but that's just me.  Pick out one you like (no cheapies) and just commit to it

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You don't have to switch stick to spinning if you want.......there are fast gear ratio on the newer spinning gear. If you want to learn a baitcaster easy and fast, invest 100$ on a shimano you will learn in a week.

15 hours ago, cgerstnerjr said:

Previously I've only tried the cheaper Academy/BPS reels. Now that I'm more serious about it and already spending more than I used to for my spinning rigs, I was looking to invest more into something better to learn with. I'm somewhat biased when it comes to what I will use, and all of my spinning rigs are either Daiwa or Lew's products, but I am starting to shy away from Lew's. I feel like their newer models just aren't the same as the stuff they were coming out with a few years ago. I was a saltwater guide specializing in speckled trout in south Louisiana and still fish for trout on occasion, and all the gear I used was always technically considered bass gear. I like using light tackle lol. But I've been looking at either the Daiwa Fuego or Tatula. Any thoughts on either of these? I don't mind spending money on fishing gear, but I was hoping to keep this combo around 300 to keep the wife off my back lol

Stay away from lews,  shimano or diawa I'm still trying to sell my lews lfs lighter faster stronger piece of junk!

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Casting gear has some real advantages. The primary one for me has been how well casting gear handles lures that "pull back" such as spinnerbaits, large cranks, and heavy lures. Spinning reels that can handle that much torque are the larger and more expensive ones, and still don't do it as well as casting gear. Casting gear can actually be lighter for this kind of fishing to get the same durability and "fishability". 

I don't "prefer" one over the other. Both have their pros and cons. I use both, usually on every trip.

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21 hours ago, cgerstnerjr said:

I've only been bass fishing about a year, and I have only used spinning gear. I've tried casting rigs and have failed because I get aggravated with backlashes and just put them aside and keep fishing. I feel like I can do anything and everything with spinning. Although I've been pretty successful so far, as I get more into bass fishing (I've fished a couple of tournaments and looking to do more), am I missing out on possibly catching more fish because I'm only using spinning rigs? I've looked into trying a baitcaster, but when I'm about to get one I talk myself out of it and just keep thinking I'm doing fine without them. Just don't want to miss out on fish because I'm slightly impatient when it comes to learning how to use one. Thanks for any advice everyone!

The biggest big bass catcher that has ever stepped on this forum, nobody here has caught as many big or as big as he has:

Fiish%20Chris%2018.4.jpg

Fishes EXCLUSIVELY with SPINNING GEAR so, seriously my man, you aren´t missing anything.

 

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I started my fishing career if you will using nothing but spinning setups and completely not understanding the point of having to deal with the frustration of backlashes and learning how to do it. Then a buddy of mine taught me how to use a baitcaster on a dead day of fishing where we didn't get a hit. I was spoiled, my first attempt learning how to use a baitcaster was with a Shimano Core which still to this day is my favorite caster, I actually just picked up another 51mg7 two days ago. Even with what is considered by many one of the best and easiest to use reels of all time it was still difficult to learn. Nearly ten years later, I have one spinning rig. That's all I need, for ultra light stuff. I use baitcasters for nearly everything else. It may just be me, but I feel much more control over the fish with a baitcaster, I feel like I have a much better handle on the rod which is important for fishing for things like Salmon because if they hit it at an angle hard enough they can pull the pole out of your hand and the last time you see it is sinking 30 feet from the boat. I also feel like you have a much better sense of line vibration on those tiny mush hits you can get on random days that make the difference between catching 5 and being skunked. Over all I am happy I learned how, and made the switch for the most part. I also don't recommend anyone trying to learn on a low end reel, I'd borrow a buddy's and offer to re-line it for him and practice in the yard before I'd want to learn on a blackmax to see if you like it, because to be fair you're not giving baitcasting a fair chance IMO at least.

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I'm dubious whenever someone says I only need spinning or I only need casting gear.  It always seems to be a little egotistical.  This post wasn't like that at all.  Good honest questions.  Paul probably nailed it when he talked about baits that pull back.  I also find that casting gear is easier to fish seated in a kayak, canoe, or small jonboat.  It keeps your hands on the same level, so no crook in your back either.  I can control a cast pretty well on a spinning rod feathering line as it peels off the spool, but not like I can thumb a casting reel's spool.  Try and do a deep drop with a baitcaster though, and it's worse than watching paint dry.  I'd rather open the bail, and let the bait fall.  Spinning gear is nicer when it's really cold too.  Your fingers always get wet with a baitcaster.  Lastly, line twist drives me nuts.  It's inevitable with spinning gear.  Almost never happens with casting gear.  Those are my takes on it.  I have quite a few of both, and also a couple clicker reels, centrepins, and fly reels.  I even keep a trusty 25 year old Zebco 33 hanging around.  If you're fishing, it's all good!

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You're getting some great advice here. All I can say is be patient. At one point in time I was content to just have a couple good spinning rigs. But I love my baitcasters now, and I couldn't imagine going back to spinning only for bass fishing. Don't try to overpower your casts. Focus on smooth easy casts without backlashing before you even think about bombing long casts. Also, if you haven't tried casting a baicaster sidearmed, give that a try. For me personally it is much easier to not backlash sidearmed. Different casting styles have their time and place, but get one thing at a time down proficiently. 

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23 hours ago, cgerstnerjr said:

 I was a saltwater guide specializing in speckled trout in south Louisiana and still fish for trout on occasion, and all the gear I used was always technically considered bass gear. I like using light tackle lol.

 

I don't mind spending money on fishing gear, but I was hoping to keep this combo around 300 to keep the wife off my back lol

I live in southwest Louisiana & grew up fishing the fresh, salt, & brackish waters of Texas/Louisiana.

The top setups from Grand Isle to Brownsville are Duckett Ghost or Falcon Coastal paired with a Shimano Citica or a Lew's Speed Spool.

I bought my grandson a H2O Maxim & it was the hardest reels I've ever tried to adjust!

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3 hours ago, Raul said:

The biggest big bass catcher that has ever stepped on this forum, nobody here has caught as many big or as big as he has:

Fiish%20Chris%2018.4.jpg

Fishes EXCLUSIVELY with SPINNING GEAR so, seriously my man, you aren´t missing anything.

 

Yup ~ I miss him.

THE BEST Huge Smallie Pictures EVER.

Of course that green bass is well past insane.

A-Jay

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I use both,For casting get the best reel you can afford.A good brake makes a big difference. 

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3 hours ago, A-Jay said:

Yup ~ I miss him.

THE BEST Huge Smallie Pictures EVER.

Of course that green bass is well past insane.

A-Jay

The best HUGE smallie, the best HUGE meanmouth, hell, I don't remember if he also has the HUGEST spot, if he ever got to Texas I bet he would catch the hugest Guadalupe bass around.

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4 minutes ago, Raul said:

The best HUGE smallie, the best HUGE meanmouth, hell, I don't remember if he also has the HUGEST spot, if he ever got to Texas I bet he would catch the hugest Guadalupe bass around.

<prayer>

Dear @Fish Chris, please give up (or at least put on hold)
car stereos, and come back to the bass world and teach 
us MORE about how monsters are caught....

<end prayer>

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On 04/30/2016 at 4:05 PM, cgerstnerjr said:

I've only been bass fishing about a year, and I have only used spinning gear. I've tried casting rigs and have failed because I get aggravated with backlashes and just put them aside and keep fishing. I feel like I can do anything and everything with spinning. Although I've been pretty successful so far, as I get more into bass fishing (I've fished a couple of tournaments and looking to do more), am I missing out on possibly catching more fish because I'm only using spinning rigs? I've looked into trying a baitcaster, but when I'm about to get one I talk myself out of it and just keep thinking I'm doing fine without them. Just don't want to miss out on fish because I'm slightly impatient when it comes to learning how to use one. Thanks for any advice everyone!

This is probably your biggest problem.  Absolutely do not learn how to use a baitcaster while fishing.  There are plenty of threads on learning how to use one including a sticky or two.  However, a baitcaster isn't required if you don't like using them.  Personally I prefer them to a spinning reel, and believe me when I say it took some time for me to get decent with one.

Like Dan said, whipping a casting rod like you would a spinning rod is a no-no.  Smooth is the number one requirement.  Sure, you can whip one after your thumb has a college education, but even then there is a better way to get more distance with less aggravation.

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I use them both. I think is comes down to comfort and having confidence in your equipment. I set up a bc with a chatter bait and a spinning rod with a grub. if I had to choose one set up I would go with then spinning set up

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