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JDH85

How do y'all learn new techniques?

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I've been thinking a lot lately about my post-spawn doldrums (LM Bass). I've got 6 rod/reel combos in the boat and every type of lure there is. Topwaters, cranks, jerks, worms, craws, lizards, grubs, spinnerbaits, buzzbaits...you get the gist. But I have never caught a bass out of more than, say, 8 feet or so of water. Post-spawn absolutely kills me every year!

So I've been wanting to learn deep water techniques. My question is -- am I better off spending a whole season taking 1 rod with me and just focusing on 1 technique? Maybe just go Carolina rig for a post-spawn/summer -- or should I rig all my rods with deep-water lures and throw everything til I get bit?

What do y'all do to "master" something new? I'm worried I might have a case of angler's ADHD <_<

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You get "good" at something having put some successful time in under your belt.  Not just throwing baits - catching with a particular bait or style.  Read up, find something that works, and keep doing it.  You'll pick up on the nuances as you go.  Don't know if you can ever "master" something though - that's the beauty of bass fishing.  Success is a moving target.

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That's the only way I can force myself to try anything new...leave the shallow stuff home!  1 or 2 different deep water techniques outta time I'd say.  That's me anyway.  I like to get really good at a certain technique before I move to the next. 

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Just as you get to Carnegie Hall in New York City.

Practice, practice, practice.

Take that one presentation with you and throw it all day.

Throw it for two or three days until you get it under control and you have confidence in it.

Make adjustments as necessary to fit your style.

It will drive you crazy at first but then you get into it and you will learn a new technique or bait.

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Completely agree with the above but ya better learn where in deep water ya wanna throw or it's gonna be a long day!

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Well Catt if I understand correctly, right now I should be looking for long-tapering points and ledges adjacent to spawning pockets. So, in the picture here I've circled what I think would be spawning areas (shallow, protected from N wind) and points that are adjacent. I would scan the ledges of the channels that run through that area and look for cover/hard bottom/bait balls.

Anything I'm missing?

OldHickBGYachtClub.jpg

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1 hour ago, JDH85 said:

So I've been wanting to learn deep water techniques. My question is -- am I better off spending a whole season taking 1 rod with me and just focusing on 1 technique? Maybe just go Carolina rig for a post-spawn/summer -- or should I rig all my rods with deep-water lures and throw everything til I get bit?
 

In a word (excluding these), yes.  But as Catt said, don't just throw anywhere.  There is an awful lot of unproductive water out there.  The reason so many people throw to the shore (besides the obvious target it provides) is that it is ONE of the more productive areas.  Study your maps and pay attention to your electronics.  Looks like you've been doing this.  It will definitely help.

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You could always ask where everyone sinks their brush piles! lol

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25 minutes ago, Ratherbfishing said:

In a word (excluding these), yes.  But as Catt said, don't just throw anywhere.  There is an awful lot of unproductive water out there.  The reason so many people throw to the shore (besides the obvious target it provides) is that it is ONE of the more productive areas.  Study your maps and pay attention to your electronics.  Looks like you've been doing this.  It will definitely help.

As I understand it, right now (post-spawn) is the time to be hitting those first points and ledges close to the spawning grounds. So the "spot on the spot" would be rock piles, brush piles, shell beds, etc that are on those points and ledges. Bonus points if there are bait balls present as well. Is that right?

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Just now, JDH85 said:

As I understand it, right now (post-spawn) is the time to be hitting those first points and ledges close to the spawning grounds. So the "spot on the spot" would be rock piles, brush piles, shell beds, etc that are on those points and ledges. Bonus points if there are bait balls present as well. Is that right?

Bass will follow the food so yes.  A place might look terrific but if there isn't any food, the bass won't hang around long.

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I generally end up just off shore from where I caught them shallow.  Seems pretty predictable, and things are a lot better with the better DI/SI mapping units, but That's usually where I try to start looking.  The exception, is when I'm looking for them in a big, seemingly featureless lake like Lake Ontario, or a bigger Finger Lake.  Then I'm SI scanning for bait.  And even then, I don't wander too far off course from my shallow spots.  Sounds limiting, and it is, but once you get this down, you can expand your search.  Start noting some features in these common spots, and then go back yo your map, and look for similar spots.  You might even find unlikely shallow spots this way, for next early season.

This is a cool thread, BTW.  I hadn't really thought too much on "why" I go where I go to fish deep.  I just sort of do it.

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@JDH85 yelp!

Noticed Below the two red circles there are two "humps" that read 11'.

I'd camp out there ;)

It may not be productive right now but they will as summer approaches y'all!

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30 minutes ago, Catt said:

@JDH85 yelp!

Noticed Below the two red circles there are two "humps" that read 11'.

I'd camp out there ;)

It may not be productive right now but they will as summer approaches y'all!

In that area we've got creek channel junctions, two humps, multiple saddles, and the classic deep water next to shallow water scenario. So I guess the approach I'll take is scan for irregular features and bait and then throw a c-rig to feel how it lays.

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Like others have said,you have to put in your time if you want to consistently do well with a particular type of lure.Spend as much time as possible with a new technique and you will eventually do well with it for sure.

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Honestly, I started with senkos. I threw those non-stop to pick up the patience and getting accurate with the bait. Then, I moved on to drop-shotting and doing other things with soft plastics.

Lately, i'm making the shift to hardbaits and trying to get the techniques down with those. I'm still reading up on locations that produce quality fish in rivers and stuff.

You can never stop learning, never forget that. 

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"usually" they wont travel to far from the spawning areas,...again "usually". Ive fished lakes that they went a lot farther than one would think, and others they were stacked up no more than 50 yards away. Depends on the body of water, location could depend on bottoms composition, available forage, available cover, TYPICAL wind direction,waters clarity, ph, available shade, etc. "I beleive" post spawn some fish will stack up on structure, some will roam, and some will stay shallow. Depending on the lake could be one of these, two, or all three.

 I'm sure that if you research this you will find a plethera, of opinions. Most dependable way to determine  this is studying the most previlent prey's habits and understanding other predatory species present to locate a area to start with, then scan the area with electronics. For example I will use  a large lake in Maine,.... most abundant bait? smelts, other predators? Pike, Lake Trout. Salmon, The smelt at this time will be hovering over very deep water in a comfy temp range, they will be tight as the lakers and salmon will be attempting to corral them and pin them to structure adjacent to said deep water. The bass will locate on the structure waiting for the smelt to be pushed right to them. "some" of the larger smallies will actually join the lakers and salmon in this act and be right under the smelts waiting for the fluttering wounded smelts to fall right into their waiting  jaws. And for where does this occur? usually on the northern shores deep drops, not too far from spawning areas, but most likely on a deeper flat "near" the deepest water.

As for techniques to learn, time with the right gear in hand.,... You may pick up a "new to you" technique and use it for a week and catch nothing, or you may learn it and in a snap be successful. Depends on your perception, fishes activity, and a bit of luck. Best way is to fish with someone that's knowledged in said technique. Experience is key, and willingness to share it is even better. A good angler will know most techniques, and be good at them. What they have to offer, and what you grasp from it, will determine your "schoolings grade". If you have no such luck to fish with someone, research.,..research,... and more research will be in your future. Eventually you will get it, but it may not be just that easy. Why you ask? ,...Another example. 

I live in new england, and when i started bass fishing there wasnt any publications on bass fishing up here. all were about the awesome trout streams and fly fishing. I had bassmasters and fishing facts with bassmasters targeting the southern impoundments, and fishing facts focused mostly around the great lakes area, wisconsin etc. I had to take their tips and "try" them here. Some worked but most didnt. I tried for over 10 years to learn a baitcasting reel and a jig and pig, with absolutely no success whatsoever. disgusted i gave up,..... I joined a bass club and in a few months, nailed it. Being tutored on something is a much more beneficial venture.

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16 hours ago, Catt said:

@JDH85 yelp!

Noticed Below the two red circles there are two "humps" that read 11'.

I'd camp out there ;)

It may not be productive right now but they will as summer approaches y'all!

Catt can read a map really well.  HE also highlights that "deep" really means "deeper." It's relative.  11' sounds shallow to me, but not after looking at the map.

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I never really learned to fish offshore structure very well and now I usually fish small bodies of water. But I like to take the new techniques to my friend's pond that's full of stunted, hungry, stupid bass and gain confidence there.

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I love this forum, every one is so helpful haha great advice listed above. 

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I read up on the technique first, make sure I can rig it correctly, learn any little tips or tricks I can. Then when I encounter conditions where said technique "should" be optimal for, I use it. I gain confidence once I catch a few fish that I didn't feel were flukes. In other words, I used the technique effectively and didn't just chance upon a random fish with it. 

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For sure follow the suggestions that have been given here.  I would do it exactly as they said but I would have one rod with a jig and craw trailer probably in some green pumpkin or watermelon or brim colors. A jig is such a versatile tool. It can be thrown onto the top of a drop and worked down in a series of hops, or you can park the boat shallower and throw deep then hop up the drops.  Next I would have a drop shot ready so I can get over any deep fish I see on the depth finder.  Drop the bait straight down and work it slowly or  cast out a ways and bring it back in slowly. The carolina rig is effective for this fishing as well.  Another important weapon is a swimbait like Reaction Innovations Skinny Dippers fished on a 3/8 ounce leadhead jigs that look like the head of a fish. Lastly summer can be a great time to rig up a big 7, 8 or even 10 inch worm. Just throw it out and slowly crawl and hop it back.  Hang on because that is not the recipe for catching dinks. Hope this helps.

To answer your original question I read everything I can on it, then watch every video about using it. Set my gear up properly and go try it.   

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Where do you catch your pre spawn bass? Post spawners tend to the return to pre spawn staging areas. The difference is post spawners are recovering and note as aggressive as pre spawn bass.

The map has a lot of good looking structure, Catts 11' saddle humps stands out for sure, that is a great looking area.

Tom

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Talked about where to fish summer transition from post spawn to summer, now let's address how to fish those deeper areas.

1. T-rigged worm or craw.

2. Jig & craw.

3. Drop shot

4. C- rig.

5. Add deep divers and swimbaits during early summer period through fall.

Tom

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This is fantastic.  I'm in exactly the same boat as the OP. (Not literally) 

These post spawn bass have been tough for me.  I have had a very hard time locating any bass.

I too realized that these bass have moved into deeper waters. Lately I've been fishing deep diving cranks off large drop off points through my lake. But with limited success.

I feel like a Carolina rig might be something I need to focus on using. (Never really spent any time using this technique)

 

 

OP. That app you used to get your lakes depths chart, does it cost?

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Depending on your lake you won't need to leave eight feet. If you have hard cover there will be fish there over the whole summer. 

If you're going out deeper make it easy and just find the fish with your electronics and use a marker buoy. 

No matter what fish sllllooooooowwwww. If the wind is too high and you can't hold a spot then move to a place you can. Make the same cast with the same bait a minimum of four times and slow down. If you think you're going slow, slow down more. 

In deeper water there will be more than one fish there. Make a mental landmark when you hook a fish to your boat position and your cast. Then keep making that same cast, change baits, every four casts. If you are fishing a school then pull your buoy and find them again if things die down. If you're fishing deep structure leave for 30 to 45 minutes so it can reload. 

Everything outside of pre and post spawn sucks in comparison. You just need to grind it out. 

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