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Savage33

Just don't understand

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There is a big flat off of Kentucky lake that I cross when heading to one of my honey holes. It's about 2 feet at summer pool.  I have a buddy that freaks out at me every time I cross it. I mean he just yells at me and tells me to slow down, that I'm gonna hit bottom. Now mind you, I cross this on plane in an 1860 aluminum boat. Basically just the prop in the water. So a couple days ago I went with him in his boat.  We crossed that flat at an idle(over a mile) with the motor at about half trim. Obviously we drug bottom all the way across it. He was freaking out about it, didn't know why we were dragging bottom "they've dropped the water level" and just a bunch of BS exscuses. He knows there is less boat in he water planed off but he always wants to slow down across it.  I just don't understand why he can't figure it out to stay planed off across it.  

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The amount of damage you can do at speed is more worry some than slow speed dragging.  Don't let him river fish.  The possibilities would give him a stroke

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I understand your point but I wouldn't cross it on plane either. I wouldn't want to run anywhere I couldn't stop quickly if I need to without tearing up a prop or skew.

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11 minutes ago, Angry John said:

The amount of damage you can do at speed is more worry some than slow speed dragging.  Don't let him river fish.  The possibilities would give him a stroke

 

I agree. But across that flat 99.9% of stumps are marked with poles. If there has been no change in water level or current since the last time I was there I just plane off and go.  I'm not a fan of dragging the bottom with the motor.  I've seen too many water pumps/impellers trashed because of it.  I'd rather get out and push the boat.  This guy grew up fishing near that flat just like I did, me knows it like the back of his hand.  I think he just has a fear of water. I've asked him a million times and he always says no. But that's the only logical thing I can come up with. 

9 minutes ago, Crappiebasser said:

I understand your point but I wouldn't cross it on plane either. I wouldn't want to run anywhere I couldn't stop quickly if I need to without tearing up a prop or skew.

I know what you are saying. And if the water level has been fluctuating or is on the rise I do slow it down across it.  I don't know, I guess I just don't worry too much about hitting something. 

 

 

Also in my original post I should have put its 2 feet deep at its shallowest. Lol. The rest is  probably 3-4

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When that .01 percent tears off your lower unit and damages your boat hull and you and whoever is in the boat with you gets hurt or killed you will learn to slow down on that flat sir.

 

I live on a stump infested lake and grow up on water that was stump infested and also had lots of shallow mud and sand flats it only takes that .01 percent before you will learn.

 

There are reason's why lakes have marked boat lanes.

 

Best of luck to you sir.

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Risk is a tricky deal and we all manage it in our own way.

Personally, I prefer to eliminate most all of it that I can - with in reason.

That's where one man may differ from another; like you & your friend.

If there were an alternate (deeper water) access to that honey hole, I would consider it;

regardless of the travel time lost.

If not, I'd certainly travel at a safe speed.  Again, my idea of that might be different from yours.

As a friendly reminder, unless your vessel is equipped with seat belts or another type of safety restraint, when /if your vessel comes to a sudden and unexpected stop, the occupants do not.  This is generally not a good thing. 

Finally, as mentioned all high speed boating comes with a certain amount of risk and yes one could strike an unseen or unmarked object even in the middle of a well marked channel.  However, shallow flats are where these same floating objects go to die (hung up on the bottom in a foot or two) often barely visible, yet still treacherous.  Very common after a high water event of any kind.   So zipping through a place that comes very close to testing the limits of your vessels draft, despite being 'well marked', may come with a little more risk.

YMMV

A-Jay

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Shallow water does present a dilemma:

When you're on full plane, the shaft is tilted Down which 'increases' the depth of the skeg.

When you're moving slower with the shaft tilted Up, the bow rides higher but the transom rides lower,

which also 'increases' the depth of the skeg.

 

To be sure, running a shoal on full plane offers the fastest passage,

but depending on the nature of the shoal, one obstacle can spoil a weekend.

The steps below offer the safest approach but also the most time-consuming approach:

> Before entering the shoal, empty your bilge and your livewell (if the livewell is in use, empty 50%)

> Situate your passenger(s) in the bow

> Tilt the shaft Up 75% (varies from meter to meter)

> Proceed no faster than 1000 RPM

 

Roger

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All good replies. I understand where y'all are coming from. There is no alternate route to get to this spot or I would take it.  Also I didn't mean to make it sounds like I run across it full speed.  Just jump on plane and leave it it there.  Maybe 10 mph. It just keeps my minds at ease knowing I'm not sucking trash through the pump while dragging bottom. 

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3 hours ago, Savage33 said:

All good replies. I understand where y'all are coming from. There is no alternate route to get to this spot or I would take it.  Also I didn't mean to make it sounds like I run across it full speed.  Just jump on plane and leave it it there.  Maybe 10 mph. It just keeps my minds at ease knowing I'm not sucking trash through the pump while dragging bottom. 

 

Sometimes that's all you can do.

A-Jay

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I too have to cross a flat to get to one of my spots. Been doing it for years and will continue doing it. I have never had a problem but i know the route like the palm of my hand. Its a risk im willing to take to catch some fish. 

 

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Reminds me of a time behind an island on the Mississippi river .  I was with a river rat friend who lived there . He was a commercial fisherman and traveled this path hundreds of times . We was in his john boat and he had it wide open . "I know this place like the back of my hand ." he said right before hitting a stump .

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Completely un-fish-related but similar fail story.  It was two days after summer let out in school, 6th grade going into 7th.  I was out riding my bike doing "wheelies".  My uncle said that I shouldn't do it because I would get hurt.  I replied, "Nah, I've been doing it for years..."

Fast forward about an hour, rode a beautiful wheelie across a parking lot and down a little drop off - like i'd done many times before.  Bike flips out from under me, and I would just land on my feet.  No biggie.  Except, this time my left leg just gave out.  Nothing hurt too bad, but I couldn't get up or move my leg...then it started to hurt.  Really hurt.  Here I am alone, in an empty parking lot and having to holler for help.  Did I mention it was behind a funeral home?  Yeah, well in a small town you know everyone.  The guy from the funeral home came out then called my dad.  Yeah, and he started with, "This is so and so (whom dad knew ran the funeral home), you're son has been in an accident."

Needless to say, there was some quick explaining and I ended up in a cast from 4 breaks in my leg for the entire summer.  Not fun.  But, it did break me of thinking it would be fine because it was before... but... didn't break me from riding wheelies lol.  Hey, you can only learn so much from one lesson...

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The driver of the boat makes the decision and assumes the risk.

If the passengers don't like it, they should not be on the boat.

 

The likelihood of bodily injury always goes up with speed and a low end can cost you 1000's

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44 minutes ago, NHBull said:

The driver of the boat makes the decision and assumes the risk.

If the passengers don't like it, they should not be on the boat.

 

The likelihood of bodily injury always goes up with speed and a low end can cost you 1000's

Um no.  If your being dangerous its just you making a choice for others that is not responsible.  Remind me to never get into any car or boat with you ever!!!!

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33 minutes ago, Angry John said:

Um no.  If your being dangerous its just you making a choice for others that is not responsible.  Remind me to never get into any car or boat with you ever!!!!

The OP was talking about his buddy who has been doing this with the OP for a while..

If the buddy continues to ride with the OP, he assumes  some responsibility.

This point was also made in court in a case that resulted from an accident that happened on Lake Winni a couple yrs ago.

The driver was deemed responsible, as they ALWAYS are, but passenger did not get damages

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Heavy rains and floods can move fallen timber around in a lake.  I've seen logs washed up into shallow flats after a bad storm.  Just because you know the area, doesn't mean the area can't change.

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1 hour ago, NHBull said:

The OP was talking about his buddy who has been doing this with the OP for a while..

If the buddy continues to ride with the OP, he assumes  some responsibility.

This point was also made in court in a case that resulted from an accident that happened on Lake Winni a couple yrs ago.

The driver was deemed responsible, as they ALWAYS are, but passenger did not get damages

Very true.  Fool me once, shame on you.  Fool me twice, shame on me.  

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