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IgotWood

Jigs in cold murky water

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Fished some really cold and murky water yesterday. Water temp was 44-46, max depth of 4' with less than 1' visibility. The fish were really glued to the structure (brush, stumps, etc), as expected. I was able to conjure up a few bites on a black 1/4 jig. But then I lost the jig and didn't have a backup. The closest I could get was 3/8 and 1/2oz black jigs, but these ones have living rubber on them. Eventhough the fall rate was probably the same as the 1/4 jig with standard silicone skirt, I feel like the bulk of the living rubber was making too big of a profile and turning off the fish.

 

How do you guys feel about living rubber in lo-vis conditions? 

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Living rubber is what I have always used and caught fish on . Cold muddy water I use to use orange pork frogs and a black living rubber jig in 3/8th ounce . 

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I would've probably started with living rubber in that situation. Less movement (distance) but still keeping the action (living rubber). Rate of fall is key with a jig and I would say that affected the bite more than skirt material

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I f your fishing in colder water the big profile with the living rubber will give them more bag for the buck per say. Thing is in colder water and slow fish you want that lighter jig. Such as a 5/16 or 3/8 oz. Personally after water temp gets below 55 deg i will go from a 1/2 to a 5/16 oz and match color to the weather. 

 

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I don't think material played a big factor, it was probably the profile or the fall rate. I know there are times when the water is cold that the fish will like that bigger bait, but more often than not they will take a smaller offering over the larger bait. In murky water the bigger bait is the one I would have thought would be better but with the cold water and it being shallow, the fall rate of the larger bait may have been the deciding factor but I do better most times in cold water with smaller jigs.

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1 hour ago, smalljaw67 said:

I don't think material played a big factor, it was probably the profile or the fall rate. I know there are times when the water is cold that the fish will like that bigger bait, but more often than not they will take a smaller offering over the larger bait. In murky water the bigger bait is the one I would have thought would be better but with the cold water and it being shallow, the fall rate of the larger bait may have been the deciding factor but I do better most times in cold water with smaller jigs.

 

X2 😉

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Hard to beat a rattle back jig in cold murky water. You need to consider the trailer water resistance and the jig weight, skirts have minimal effect on fall rate.

Tom

 

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6 minutes ago, WRB said:

Hard to beat a rattle back jig in cold murky water. You need to consider the trailer water resistance and the jig weight, skirts have minimal effect on fall rate.

Tom

 

 

Excuse me!

 

Skirts have a profound effect on rate of fall

 

A 40 strand skirted jig will fall faster than a 60 strand skirted jig!

 

Flat rubber skirts have less strands than any skirts, when placed on a jig it will fall faster. 

 

Wanna slow down a 3/4 ounce jig!

 

Double skirt it 😉

 

 

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1 minute ago, Catt said:

 

Excuse me!

 

Skirts have a profound effect on rate of fall

 

A 40 strand skirted jig will fall faster than a 60 strand skirted jig!

 

Flat rubber skirts have less strands than any skirts, when placed on a jig it will fall faster. 

 

Wanna slow down a 3/4 ounce jig!

 

Double skirt it 😉

 

 

Trailer slows it more then skirts. Take off the skirt verses putting on 2 skirts and I agree there is a difference. Put on a big paddle tail trailer it falls much slower.

Tom

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Just now, WRB said:

Trailer slows it more then skirts. Take off the skirt verses putting on 2 skirts and I agree there is a difference. Put on a big paddle tail trailer it falls much slower.

Tom

 

Your hero Dee Thomas & his protege Gary Klein strongly disagree!

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1 hour ago, Catt said:

 

Your hero Dee Thomas & his protege Gary Klein strongly disagree!

Everything being equal, the only difference being the skirt then I agree a bulkier skirt matters.

Tom

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Y'all tell which one will produce a slower fall 😉

4611-0038.jpg

skirts-brown-sunfish-new2.jpg

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Anyone have a tall glass tube and a stopwatch?

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So to recap: A trailer that provides resistance slows it down, and a bulkier skirt slows it down...and the slower fall rate, however you get it, may be a key factor in cold murky water. 

 

Have I got it?

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2 hours ago, MIbassyaker said:

So to recap: A trailer that provides resistance slows it down, and a bulkier skirt slows it down...and the slower fall rate, however you get it, may be a key factor in cold murky water. 

 

Have I got it?

But also the fast rate of fall could be a key as wellb to trigger a reaction strike.

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Thank you all for the input! I I understand most of what was said. My other question though, was whether living rubber is necessary and these conditions? I mean, there is no visibility. By letting that jig soak, is the living rubber actually doing anything to be noticed? The only thing I notice it did for me was bulk up my bait. 

 

And my very respectful contribution to the fall rate and material debate; I highly agree that skirt material will slow the fall rate of a jig. Rubber is buoyant. Not only the buoyancy, but the drag it creates in the water slows it down as well. Of coarse a trailer will do this too, but maybe not to the same effect, in my opinion. All things considered, between skirt material, bulkiness, and trailer type, many adjustments can be made to pinpoint the fall rate you are looking for!

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4 hours ago, IgotWood said:

All things considered, between skirt material, bulkiness, and trailer type, many adjustments can be made to pinpoint the fall rate you are looking for!

 

I agree with your conclusion on what affects the fall rate.  Also, consider that the fish turning off after you switched to living rubber may have had nothing to do with the bait at all.  When fishing colder water, I often find a small bite window of 30 minutes to an hour is where I catch most of my fish, and then it shuts off or slows down.

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17 hours ago, Catt said:

Y'all tell which one will produce a slower fall 😉

4611-0038.jpg

skirts-brown-sunfish-new2.jpg

The bulkier colorful skirt in bottom pic will produce more resistance in the water therefore falling slower than the smaller black skirt in top pic both using the same size weight. 

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This year I plan on adding skirts to the Texas right for a slow bulky fall

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The topic is cold murky water and the ROF isn't a big deal under these conditions IMO. Helping bass find the jig using rattles is important as bites on the fall are not as frequent as bites on the retreive.

Trailers that move lots of water also aide the bass to locate the jig, suttle stealth movements may not be needed. Murky water is where black with bright highlites really shines. Lunker lure rattle back jigs with Gamakatsu hooks is what I use under these conditions and jigs heavy enough to keep in contact with like 1/2 oz to 3/4 oz depending on wind and depth.

Tom

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On 2/11/2018 at 2:35 PM, smalljaw67 said:

I don't think material played a big factor, it was probably the profile or the fall rate. I know there are times when the water is cold that the fish will like that bigger bait, but more often than not they will take a smaller offering over the larger bait. In murky water the bigger bait is the one I would have thought would be better but with the cold water and it being shallow, the fall rate of the larger bait may have been the deciding factor but I do better most times in cold water with smaller jigs.

 

Still the best answer! 😉

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Been awhile since I've fished the cold muddy water of the Northwest...but give me a 1/4 or 3/8 home tied jig (black/blue) with a large chunk and 20# line.  I also like a soft entry to not try and spook fish just moving up from the depths.  

Matter of fact...today am going to try that here locally.....we had a ton of rain and the water is still in the 40's.  Hopefully will have something to report.

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