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Tyler.

Spinning or casting for bass jig or Texas rigged.

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What is everyone’s take on using bass jigs or creature baits with casting or spinning set ups? I know casting typically reels faster but what advantages/disadvantages do you see with both type of setups?

 

Im setting up both using braided line with leader. #2 question is I understand the advantages of a fluorocarbon leader, but why not a mono leader with mist green line?

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You can catch bass on both. There will be more options in MH/H power in casting rods. Many brands make MH spinning rods and you can get spinning reels in 6.0+ gear ratios now. Use what you comfortable with. 

 

I have a Irod 713 spinning rod (Fred's Power Finesse) paired with a Daiwa Tatula 3000 https://www.tacklewarehouse.com/iROD_Genesis_II_Series_Spinning_Rods/descpage-IRGST.html

 

Not my first choice for heavy cover, but I'm not afraid to throw 3/8oz and lighter t-rigs on it. I especially like it for throwing tubes. 

 

You want something you feel comfortable with so you can build confidence in it. I do recommend going with baitcasting setups because you will learn to become more accurate and be able to fish the heaviest cover.

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Take yer pick. Both get the job done and both catch bass.

 

As for leaders, mono will work, was used for years before 

fluoro and copolys hit the market. That said, I like how fluoro

transmits bottom contact. For me it is either Yo-Zuri Hybrid

or Gamma Edge fluoro for leader.

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The difference between a spinning reel and a baitcast reel is in how they respool line.

The spinning reel has a stationary spool it only spins backwards to release line under the force of a drag. The spinning reel operates by wrapping your line around the fixed spool by a rotar with a bail roller, each turn of the rotar make 1 wrap, about 6 wraps per reel handle rotation. You manually open the bail to cast line without easy method to stop the line using one hand, close the bail to retreive line. The major downside with spinning reels is line is twisted with each rotar turn and low accuracy of target casting, upside is easily casting very light weight lures 1/8 oz or less.

Baitcasting reels have a free spinning spool when disengaged from the drive gears, can turn backwards under drag force, various breaking designs to help prevent the spool spinning faster then the line comming off when casting, easy to stop the spool spinning using your thumb making accurate target casting easy. The spinning spool design doesn't twist line when retreiving it.

Accurate casting with no line twist baitcasting reels excel. Downside is baitcasting reels require more skill to cast then spinning reels.

Line twist shows up with braid as wind knots, braid twists but because it's yarn the twist take time to tighten the line. Monofilament nylon or FC are ridgid and twist easily to impact line ability to lay on the spool evenly creating severe casting problems unless the line is allowed to untwist when using a spinning reel.

 

For all the above reasons a baitcasting reel is superior performing reel for accurate target casting and eliminates line twist.

Tom

 

 

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I never use a spinning rod for these techniques unless I'm fishing a VERY small jig or creature bait. If a spinning rod suits you better then there is definitely nothing illegal about but I have found more benefit in using a baitcasting rod for these techniques.

 

Baitcasting rods tend to have a lot more power and backbone, and spinning reels normally don't come with a strong drag for pulling bass out of vegetation. It is also easier to throw those heaver weights on a baitcasting rod. It is also a whole lot more efficient for you to use a baitcasting rod if you are flipping lures. A spinning rod generally may have more sensitivity, but when you're using big weights and heavy braid I find it a lot better to use a baitcasting rod.

 

Once again if you just can't do baitcasting that is fine but generally baitcasting is the way to go for these techniques.

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7 hours ago, Finnz922 said:

You can catch bass on both. There will be more options in MH/H power in casting rods. Many brands make MH spinning rods and you can get spinning reels in 6.0+ gear ratios now. Use what you comfortable with. 

 

I have a Irod 713 spinning rod (Fred's Power Finesse) paired with a Daiwa Tatula 3000 https://www.tacklewarehouse.com/iROD_Genesis_II_Series_Spinning_Rods/descpage-IRGST.html

 

Not my first choice for heavy cover, but I'm not afraid to throw 3/8oz and lighter t-rigs on it. I especially like it for throwing tubes. 

 

You want something you feel comfortable with so you can build confidence in it. I do recommend going with baitcasting setups because you will learn to become more accurate and be able to fish the heaviest cover.

This is why I don't understand all I know about rods.  :o  3/16-7/16 oz. is not a MH rod in my book.  Yet some Medium spinning rods are listed to 3/4 oz.  Maybe more.  Which isn't a Medium to me, but a MH.  If a rod has the backbone power of a MH, then why can't the tip handle more than 716 oz.?  Very confusing.  :wall3:

 

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Question #2, bass are not line shy fish. Don't base your line decision on line being hard for you to see line, that makes it harder for you to see line movements, the bass don't care.

What affects the bass is how the line interacts with the lure.

The sooner you realize there isn't a standard for rod power and every mfr rates their rods differently the sooner you will select rods by touch and feel. Suggested lure weights are no more then a suggestion to seperate varuios rod models within the same mfr's offering. Action is more consistant between rod mfr's.

Tom

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I don't use braid with leaders any more.  I never found a knot that I liked.  I can tell you that I was getting my butt kicked with me in the front of my boat when I was using 10# mono and the guy in the back was using 12# fluoro.  It took 2 trips before I was smart enough to switch.  I say use fluoro if you are going to go braid with a leader.

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52 minutes ago, WRB said:

Question #2, bass are not line shy fish. Don't base your line decision on line being hard for you to see line, that makes it harder for you to see line movements, the bass don't care.

What affects the bass is how the line interacts with the lure.

The sooner you realize there isn't a standard for rod power and every mfr rates their rods differently the sooner you will select rods by touch and feel. Suggested lure weights are no more then a suggestion to seperate varuios rod models within the same mfr's offering. Action is more consistant between rod mfr's.

Tom

True on the line shine fish. Would you consider walleye and crappie in that same category? I know trout fishing you better have the smallest line possible. I guess I tend to be overly cautious like I’m fishing for them. 

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22 minutes ago, Tyler. said:

True on the line shine fish. Would you consider walleye and crappie in that same category? I know trout fishing you better have the smallest line possible. I guess I tend to be overly cautious like I’m fishing for them. 

Rainbow trout have microscopic vision and feed on tiny insects to smaller sizes crustaceans and baitfish, don't believe brown trout are as fussy. Crappie are in the pearch family same as walleye, I don't know if crappie are line shy but  tend to eat small size minnows insect larvae so line over 6 lb test affects the tiny lures action. Walleyes have exceptional vision at night but I caught them on 8 lb to 10 mono consistantly during day light using bass lures in Canada, my inlaws used braid tied direct to jig w/live minnows and catch them so I don't think they are line shy fish.

Tom

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dated but still very good ... 

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24 minutes ago, greentrout said:

 

 

dated but still very good ... 

I have watched this several times! love Bill Dance. 

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6 minutes ago, Tyler. said:

I have watched this several times! love Bill Dance. 

Always knew B. Dance liked to use spinning gear ... I use it about 30 percent of the time and still get ribbed about it from time to time ....

 

good fishing ...

 

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