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Speed Cranking a Deep Diver?


NeroXyn
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So I have done some research on deep diving crankbaits (although I am wholly a bank fisherman using squarebills).

Most people would agree that for deep diving should use a low speed gear (something 5.4:1 to 6.4:1), but I saw videos from TacticalBassin on YouTube explaining different type of retrieve which they called "Speed Cranking". Their setup in term of reel is entirely the opposite than the general wisdom. They would use high speed gear such as 8+:1 ratio, and they work the crankbait like "burn, burn, pause. Burn, burn, pause."

I was wondering what you guys generally think about that, and if anyone actually try using that technique?

 

I believe they say it should work on any type of crankbaits, because the main idea is to trigger the core reaction strike rather than feeding.

 

One of the examples

As for squarebills.

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Normally the lower gearing is to save your arms and wrists from the resistance of deep water cranking plus the line retrieve rate.  You could do it with any gearing you want, you just have to adjust your retrieve speed.  

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Agreed.  And a lot of conventional wisdom about needing a low speed reel for deep divers comes from back when most deep divers pulled really hard.  A lot of the newer deep diving crankbaits don't pull as hard as a lot of the older ones, so you can get away with a higher speed reel.  Especially if your reel has longer handles, which give you more leverage.  

 

I like to reel my deep divers in pretty fast sometimes.  Just like my shallow crankbaits.  I will usually experiment with speed and the number and frequency of the pauses to see what works.  I don't really have a set pattern until something starts working for me that day.  

 

Pretty much everything you do with a square bill, I'll do with a deep diver.  The only differences for me are I'll use a heavier rod and usually switch over to braided line.  

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   I tried high-speed retrieves on deep divers below a dam in the river ...... once. They were 1/2 to 3/4 oz. The first 10 minutes was fun. The next ten minutes was work. After that, it was torture.

 

   Anyone who can burn a 12-15' deep diver with an 8:1 reel for any length of time is more man than I am.  ? ? ?          jj

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18 minutes ago, jimmyjoe said:

   I tried high-speed retrieves on deep divers below a dam in the river ...... once. They were 1/2 to 3/4 oz. The first 10 minutes was fun. The next ten minutes was work. After that, it was torture.

 

   Anyone who can burn a 12-15' deep diver with an 8:1 reel for any length of time is more man than I am.  ? ? ?          jj

I have some Muskie baits you can throw on it if you want to need prescription painkillers after.

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16 hours ago, Bryan F. S. said:

So I have done some research on deep diving crankbaits (although I am wholly a bank fisherman using squarebills).

Most people would agree that for deep diving should use a low speed gear (something 5.4:1 to 6.4:1), but I saw videos from TacticalBassin on YouTube explaining different type of retrieve which they called "Speed Cranking". Their setup in term of reel is entirely the opposite than the general wisdom. They would use high speed gear such as 8+:1 ratio, and they work the crankbait like "burn, burn, pause. Burn, burn, pause."

I was wondering what you guys generally think about that, and if anyone actually try using that technique?

 

I believe they say it should work on any type of crankbaits, because the main idea is to trigger the core reaction strike rather than feeding.

 

One of the examples

As for squarebills.

  I tried TB's crankbait with the burn pause method shortly after ice out this Spring.  Doubt the water was warmer than the high 40's.  Both times I caught fish, good fish and at a pretty good rate.  Besides the pain of high speed cranking, there's the issue of braid and ice.  Eventually I'd freeze up my level wind or completely ice dam every hole on my combo!  Until I upgrade my gear, I've come to realize that speed cranking is only fun while catching.  

 

scott

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On 6/23/2021 at 11:36 AM, TOXIC said:

Normally the lower gearing is to save your arms and wrists from the resistance of deep water cranking plus the line retrieve rate.  You could do it with any gearing you want, you just have to adjust your retrieve speed.  

Is it also because normally people would just steady retrieve with crankbaits?
 

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I bought a pair of Abu 5.4:1 "Winch" reels and a Lew's BB1 5.1:1 reel to help slow down my retrieves!   They do make cranking large deep divers a piece of cake though.   Heck... use a rod sweep for the "burn" and crank in the line on the "pause"! ;)

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Deep diving cranks were my go to summer baits for years and I had the forearms to prove it.  I still use cranks in 18-25ft. of water, but rarely are they the big billed ones. I believe cranks are rarely seen by fish at those depths which makes them a great alternative to other presentations.

BTW, in the video, the reason the technique is working for them is that they aren't bouncing the bait off the bottom, or cover. Anytime I fish a crank and am not making contact with something, I use a similar retrieve using the rod.

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26 minutes ago, papajoe222 said:

Deep diving cranks were my go to summer baits for years and I had the forearms to prove it.  I still use cranks in 18-25ft. of water, but rarely are they the big billed ones. I believe cranks are rarely seen by fish at those depths which makes them a great alternative to other presentations.

BTW, in the video, the reason the technique is working for them is that they aren't bouncing the bait off the bottom, or cover. Anytime I fish a crank and am not making contact with something, I use a similar retrieve using the rod.

That's a good thought! I didn't even think of that. Thanks!

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Back in the early 70's when Big O's were all the rage I use to burn the deep divers off the left or right side of points and just hammer 4 to 6 pound bass. I'm talking 20-25 bass in a hour sometimes. This was in the fall in VA. My buddy caught a 14.2 doing  just that. I saw the photo of it, a beastly proportioned monster that looked like it would explode. These baits cranked hard felt like you already had a three pound bass on! I heard Popeye used to do a lot of speed crankin' ~ ya think?

Popeye.jpg

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Deep diving crankbaits with diving bill that nearly equals the body length have a max speed before rolling over. The bill turns more then 90 degrees caused by speed it rolls.

 There are few deep divers designed for higher speeds with a tighter wiggle in lieu wider wobble.

Tactical Bassin designed a faster deep diver for their presentation promotion.

I simply use a 3/4 oz Scrounger jig w/6” Sluggo trailer that runs a deep as I let sink between 20’ to 40’ and as fast as want retrieve without fighting the lure.

Tom

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On 6/24/2021 at 7:57 PM, WRB said:

Deep diving crankbaits with diving bill that nearly equals the body length have a max speed before rolling over. The bill turns more then 90 degrees caused by speed it rolls.

 There are few deep divers designed for higher speeds with a tighter wiggle in lieu wider wobble.

Tactical Bassin designed a faster deep diver for their presentation promotion.

I simply use a 3/4 oz Scrounger jig w/6” Sluggo trailer that runs a deep as I let sink between 20’ to 40’ and as fast as want retrieve without fighting the lure.

Tom


Interesting that you mentioned Scrounger jig, because it looks like a chatterbait with a fixed blade attached to the head.

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The design of the crankbait is important for speed cranking. As mentioned, The TB Tactical DD 75 was designed to be burned.

The Berkley Dredgers also react well to speed and don't fatigue too much.

The resistance created by the actual body design coupled  with a wide bill create alot of drag. Slimmer, smaller CB's perform much better at high speed. The Berkley Dredger 17.5 is often my go too. I get that to just shy of 20' on 30# braid with a short piece of mono and to 19' on 12# fluoro. I burn it with a 5.6:1 reel. I tried using 6.8:1 and have found that 6.1 is the fastest I would prefer for deep cranks.

I do catch alot of fish cranking and crank more than any other technique.

Cranking has also produced my biggest fish and twice in derbs I have weighed bags in excess of 25#.

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20 hours ago, Bryan F. S. said:


Interesting that you mentioned Scrounger jig, because it looks like a chatterbait with a fixed blade attached to the head.

Chatter baits have a wider wobble making lots of noise a more frantic action.

Scrounger heads have a tighter silent action comparable to the original Rapala Minnow that can turn on strikes, depending on the bass. 

I prefer Scrounger with Sluggo trailer to achieve the tight wiggle, works for me.

Tom

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