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Draining pond question


Basstermind
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So here's the deal - there are 2 smallish ponds I have been fishing, and oddly both stand pipes have sprung a leak and have been draining the ponds relatively fast (although the rate of leakage has decreased as the water levels have fallen).  I've tried to repair both of them, but with only moderate success and said repairs are likely pretty temporary given the condition of the pipe as a whole.  Anyway, I figured the "noble" thing to do was to catch as many of the bass as I could and transfer them to their respective forever homes.  In one case the pond is only about 100 feet from a very large USACOE lake and in the other the pond is about the same distance to a small river with consistent flow (both repositories have healthy bass populations). 

 

I have been catching them like gangbusters and then hustle them over to the new location.  So far, they all seem to be very chipper when I put them in the new spot - I even had a 5+ pounder turn around and just stare at me after the release.  He/she was probably p!ssed, but I like to thank they were somehow thankful ?

 

My theory is that when water levels in ponds drop precipitiously (like 70% down or more) their usual prey food quickly run out of cover and subsequently get devoured in short order (especially in the summer months).  After they essentially wipe out the minnows and small bluegills, they risk starving - to say nothing about potential temperature issues and low DO conditions that can occur in very shallow water.  In these ponds I hardly ever see any minnows now, so it seems they wouldn't have much to live off of.  And eventually it seems likely the ponds would either dry up or come very close to it.

 

So was the transfer the right call?  I have read the bass are like most animals and are creatures of habit, so introducing them into an entirely new environment can disorient them and make it challenging for them to feed effectively.  But bass also seem very resilient, so I am hopeful that they will quickly adapt to their new minnow (and crayfish) rich surroundings - even though I will probably never catch them again.   

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3 hours ago, Bassturbating said:

So was the transfer the right call?

I don’t know about your state but here it is illegal to move fish from one body of water to another.  A lot of damage can be done by well meaning people.

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2 minutes ago, Tennessee Boy said:

I don’t know about your state but here it is illegal to move fish from one body of water to another.  A lot of damage can be done by well meaning people.

Beat me to it. Not legal to transfer fish from one water body to another here either without a written permit.

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Seriously good information fellas, even though I now feel like a complete dope.  I did actually talk to our some NC WRC staff and they didn't offer any objection, with one pointing out the dam was likely to fail soon anyway and they'd be in lake anyway (or at least some would).  

 

That said, I won't be doing any more transfers.  Again, I really appreciate the insight. 

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As has been stated, you have effectively illegally stocked the COE lake and then posted about it online. You risk introducing diseases and parasites to the COE lake when you do this as well. Shallow water in warm weather can increase these risks. You should start eating those fish or maybe find someone else who wants to gamble with their private pond, but from a legal and aquatic ecosystems standpoint you should stop doing that right away 

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18 hours ago, thediscochef said:

As has been stated, you have effectively illegally stocked the COE lake and then posted about it online. You risk introducing diseases and parasites to the COE lake when you do this as well. Shallow water in warm weather can increase these risks. You should start eating those fish or maybe find someone else who wants to gamble with their private pond, but from a legal and aquatic ecosystems standpoint you should stop doing that right away 

Those fish could have diseases or parasites in them!  You should eat them!  

 

But yeah, I get where you're coming from and agree.  It just sounds funny to hear those two ideas, back-to-back.  

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22 minutes ago, Bankc said:

Those fish could have diseases or parasites in them!  You should eat them!  

 

But yeah, I get where you're coming from and agree.  It just sounds funny to hear those two ideas, back-to-back.  

I thought the same thing. 

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Yall are aware that most fish you eat have a cooked parasite in them somewhere right? We are aware of the function of cooking, yes? ?? disease like LMBV don't affect humans and that would be the main concern I think

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28 minutes ago, thediscochef said:

We are aware of the function of cooking, yes?

As long as you adequately cook them to the desired minimum time/temperature gradient.  That's why there is a consumer warning with seafood, meat, and eggs when you buy it in the store or order it at a restaurant.  Under cooking it carries a higher risk of pathogen/foodborne illness.  The kill step is up to you.

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Considering changing the title of this thread to something like "Don't be an idiot like this guy and transfer fish" for my fellow village idiots out there.  It seems obvious in retrospect, but it may be helpful to other future well intentioned dummies.

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i bet that big bass is happy to munch on new baits.  to add: we had a local pond get drained for the exact same reason.  the engineers dont typically put the outfall inlet at the very bottom of the lake (Lake Mead might be the exception) so they let it drop to the bitter end.  and then came in and fixed the problem.  it sat that way for a long time, because of our drought.  but then, the skies puked rain and rain and rain.  i got a small bass out of there!!  some survived.  i think in the long run, the bass will bounce back, hopefully healthier and BIGGER.  

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