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Why would you want a 70 size reel over a 'normal' size reel?


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  • Super User

See title.  I don't get it for the most part.  Only reason I can think of is to save on backing.  Plus a 70 size requires smaller diameter lines if you want more than 75-85 yards of line.  Maybe if you plan on only flipping or pitching with the 70 size?  I barely had any line left on my Salamandura with 12# mono.  This was with a 6'10" rod.  Pretty sure a 7'6" rod would leave nothing left on the spool.  Personally I like more than a couple yards left after a long cast.  A short cast can be made with any reel.

 

So why are 70 and 80 size reels becoming more popular?

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  • Super User

Maybe because they should be smaller and therefore easier to palm?

 

That is too small a size for me with regard to line capacity. I am a shore angler and if I had forced long break off 3-4 times, my reel would no longer be at optimum capacity. I would agree with you that a reel that size better suited to flipping and pitching and what I call close quarter combat and ideally from some floating device. If you get snagged, you can usually get to your lure. 
 

More importantly, my reels need to pull double duty for bass and salmon. 
 

With that said, I think I would enjoy using a reel that size, it it doesn’t meet my requirements. 

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  • Super User

I'm dropping down to .008 diameter braid on the above reel.  (Already have it on hand.)  Have two Shimano 70s that I will be using either .007 or .006 diameter braid on.  Will have to order that line.

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I'd think due to their versatility in throwing lighter baits while also being able to hold a fair amount of more standard diameter line.  Those sub 100 sized reels are generally good for baits around the 3/16 mark and above, with some performing well below that in the 1/8 territory.  Let's take the Steez CT and Millionaire CT for instance; well capable of 1/8 performance with more standard diameter lines such as 8 or 10lb.  The spools in those 70 size reels tend to be light, usually in the 9-12g range while a 100 size will be in the 15-18g range generally speaking.  This largely depends on the manufacturer and spool design.  

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I have a number of 70 size Curados on lighter rods used with lighter baits. Haven't been "spooled" by a bass yet and fewer backlashes to boot 😉👍

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I honestly couldn't fish with a 70 or 80 sized reel.

My 100 sized reels feel just a bit small as it is, a 70 sized reel would be falling out of my hands or cause them to cramp. But a 150 is too big (Daiwa's), The Shimanos are like a size inbetween.

This is why i love my SLX MGL 70, its a 70 sized spool in the regular sized SLX frame.

The MGL spool with 30lb Power Pro braid is amazing, can cast lighter baits very far with ease, and also does great with heavier stuff too. My favorite baits are lipless cranks, football jigs, and Chatterbaits, and my favorite reel was the Dawia Tatula CT, it could cast so far. Well when i got my MGL with 30lb braid, (idk what diameter it is, dont really care about diameter unless using YZH) i could actually cast my favorite baits i use 98% of the time just as far if not a few feet farther. The reel always had plenty of line left, and didnt go down to the arbor knot once.

The distance isnt what made it my new favorite over the Tatula CT, it was how much easier it was to cast it and get that distance. I really had to overwork that Tatula, the SLX MGL felt like it worked with me.

The other 70 reels im not sure how they are to cast, but Shimano outdid themselves with the MGL spool. They just released the new SLX MGL, but sadly its ugly in my opinion, the color on the last gen was amazing, why change whats not broke. So ill be waiting for someone to sell off the remaining stock of the last gens at a good price.

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Here goes, a 70 size reel is perfect for lighter lures, flipping and pitching or even lower line capacity and standard lines. 

 

The SLX 70 is a smaller frame, Alphas CT SV 70 is an amazing power BFS reel, while being capable of running enough 8lb line for anything you'd use it for. I've got a Revo Ultracast BF8 on my BFS rod with 8lb 832. I've used Shimano 50, 70, 100, 200, Daiwa 70, 100, 150, 200, Abu BF8, Revo, Beast 40. They all have their purpose, but they won't all fit everyone's needs. I prefer lighter reels and smaller capacities while having the ability to still fish whatever I need to. For example, I have a Revo MGX on a Fitzgerald 6'8 MH with 10lb copoly for creek and river smallies. I will be slinging topwaters, shallow cranks, etc. This reel, if I change line to, 6lb, it'll run down to 1/8 without issue, but can also be used for big topwaters and 30lb braid. It's really up to you what you want to use. If you don't like smaller frames, cool, more for those of us that do.

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I run 2 Curado bfs for my finesse fishing. Never an issue with being spooled. 

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70 size reels are amazing.  Super comfortable to palm all day.  Never once had an issue with being spooled, though the above mention of bank fishing and long break offs is legit.  If you are bank fishing and have 3 or 4 of those in a day, that could be an issue.  The Shimano MGL 70's are some of the best casting reels you can get from any manufacturer.  Easily cast weightless and up.  Great for anything and everything except bombing long casts in open water.  The obvious larger baits require a larger spool and larger line to compensate for the style of fishing (Swimbaits, DD cranks, etc.)  But if you are just flipping docks, casting structure, bed fishing, pitching or whatever, 70's will always be my first choice.  I have five 70's, three 150's, one 200, and one 300 for example.  IF you are a fisherman that has limited funds, and can only have one baitcaster, most definitely do yourself a favor and buy a 150 or 200 size reel that will cover most all techniques.  But if you have multiple rods, then do yourself a favor and get some 70 size reels.

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  • Super User

Because they handle and work great. I cast 1/2 oz jigging spoons on one of my 70's with 10 lb FC and haven't emptied the spool with a 7' rod. I've also caught some pretty nice Hybrids and Stripers on the same rig.

Screenshot_20240618_123806_Gallery.jpg

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  • Super User

Big difference between Daiwa Tatula 70 and Shimano SLX 70 spool width and line capacity. The Daiwa T Wing takes up space narrowing the spool compared to Shimano. 
Something to consider.

Tom

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If you only fish ponds you can throw a rock across then a smaller and lighter 70 size reel will hold all the line you need.  Unless you snag a beaver. 

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I fish dirty shallow reservoirs full of grass and timber. Rarely ever do I need to make a full cast at maximum distance. Instead I make a bunch of short precise casts and a smaller reel is lighter and more comfortable in doing so. I do have quite a few deeper spooled reels for deeper cranks, traps, top water, etc. But I’d says at least 80% of my casts in a day are under 25 yards. 

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I won’t buy a reel over 100 size. For 99% of anglers you’re going to “use” the first 30yds of line nearly all the time. Any extra line is just sitting there wasted on the spool if you don’t use backing. 
 

 

I prefer the smaller reels for their lighter frames and generally easier time palming. I’d happily frog on my aldebarran if I wasn’t worried I’d blow the gears out of it. 

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Smaller, more comfortable in the hand, slightly lighter. 
 

Not a huge deal, but they’re nice in certain cases, such as balancing a shorter rod better. 

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  • Super User

Rather than multi-quoting I will make my responses/comments to the above here.

 

I've got full size reels weighing the same or less than an 70 SLX MGL.  Don't need a 70 SLX to balance a shorter rod.  I fish from shore.  A 25 yard cast would be a bare minimum.  35-40 yards is probably closer to average.  With certain lures, 70 yards is manageable.  A cast like that will leave little left on the spool with a 70 size reel with 12# or larger mono.  (225 feet = 75 yards)  However, this just points out we should use the right tool for the job.

 

I have large hands (not extra large) and I don't have a problem palming any of my reels.  Unfortunately I seldom notice little things so many of you won't be as clueless as I am to small nuances.

 

I haven't fished any ponds small enough to throw a rock across since I was a teenager.

 

I almost spool my Salamadura with 12# mono on a 6'10" rod and a 5/8 oz. lipless crankbait.  Which is why I am going to change the line to .008 diameter braid that I have on hand.  That should leave me with enough yards left to feel comfortable on the longest casts.

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If you fish braid, you can turn the question around and ask why is a 200 sized reel ever needed.  150 for cranks, 300 for swimbaits, and 70 for everything else.

 

scott

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