Jump to content
MDBasser

Baitcaster Casting Problems

Recommended Posts

Hey all, this is a question regarding casting with a baitcaster. I have used spinning outfits, but recently purchased my first baitcaster. However, I didnt realize the difficulty in casting these. I think I might be doing something wrong, because I frequently get significant backlash, and the line on the spool ends up getting all tangled. I know you have to stop the line with your thumb once it hits the water, but I am sometimes experiencing tangles before that even happens. Any advice on the proper way to cast these, or some techniques to use?

Also, I got the baitcaster because I wanted to be able to throw some heavier lures with some more distance and accuracy. It seems like I can cast my spinning outfits farther. I have to be extra careful with the baitcaster because of the frequent tangles I experience. Do these just take a lot of practice to master, or could I be doing something terribly wrong? Also, can anyone give advice on the reel settings?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, they do take a lot of practice to master. I just bought my first BC back in the spring and I practiced with it every night for the first month that I had it. After that I kind of got the hang of it. I still get a backlash every now and then, I still get a "professional overrun" sometimes but not very often any more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You just lift your thumb enough to allow the spool to rotate freely but not lifting it too much or the line begins to flow through the port.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just above this comment is a post by Zebco202 which refrences the tutorial by ReelMech.

I think this will help you with all of the technical prolems you have faced.

There is a learning curve, but once you have climbed the ladder, it is worth the effort.

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the advice guys. I read through that article and made some adjustments, and It made a huge difference. Although I do need some more practice, I feel much more comfortable with it already.

Thanks!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with reel mech in his article.  If you have the reel's owners manual by all means read it and familirize yourself with the controls for your reel.  Having the reel adjusted for the lure you are casting has everything to do with sucessful casts.  Here is an encouraging story for you:

My son and I have been fishing together for two years now, just about every weekend except for winter.  He just turned 9 last week and has always used Zebco 33 spincating reels and the ocassional spinning reel.  He has been wanting to learn to use a baitcaster for a while now, so for his birthday he asked for fishing equiment money from everyone.  I took him shopping and he bought an Abu Garcia Ambassador C4.  We set it up on a old 6-6 med ugly stick we had while saves for a better rod (he want's a BPS Crankin Stick).  We tied on a plug and he began to cast in the back yard.  I was dissaponited to see that he would only cast a few times, get frustratd and set it down.  He lated came back and cast a few more times and that was it for the day.  I thought to myself "you are never going to get the hang of this if you don't work harder at it than that".  Then we took the boat out yesterday.  There was a night and day difference in his casting.  He had 5 backlashes in 7 hours.  I am not sure what made the difference, but he did so much better and loved his new reel.  Maybe actually fishing made it more interesting.  Maybe catching a fish on it and felling the difference made him want to try harder.  I don't know.  He has not mastered it yet.  His casts with a 3/8 oz. spinner bait are still only going about 20-30 feet, but that is great for a beginner, and more importantly, he is having fun doing it.

So adjust your reel and keep at it.  You will get the hang of it.  My son alreay says he would ever wantto go back to spincast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest DavidGreen

x-trued,

Your story is typical for those trying to learn a baitcaster in the front or back yard. It is very intimidating to try and learn a casting technique with the trees and bushes that many yards have. Especially when the new-comer to baitcasting is trying to learn only for one reason the "longest cast they can".

Many anglers forget go short at first.....

I have had adult and juniors alike get really nervous of the fact that they haven't learned enough control to keep the practice plugs out of the trees and/or bushes and it does cause them to choke up.

When I sponsored the Junior Bass Club here, we would load all of them up take them to a park in an open area, and you would be amazed at the fun they had. Set up some targets on a football field or open space area and watch how fast they learn...

Practice......Practice.......Practice......Practice

Tight Lines All!    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

when i first learned baitcasting i wanted to throw mine in the lake.i was 34 yeras old at the time.after i mastered it i wound up prefering it to spinning.i still have a spinning rod but most ofmy fishing is done baitcasting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have a problem casting a baitcaster. I fall into the same catagory as another poster on this site that states, "I never met a baitcaster that I can't backlash". I got a good laugh out of that ! I don't know if I should list brand names on this forum, but her goes. About six years ago I decided to "upgrade" to a "better" quality reel. I dived right in a bought me six (6), Quantum (Zebco) Tour Edition 600 baitcasters.

These babies were advertised as the "Cadillac" of the round type baitcaster. Six bearings and cast like a dream.  NOT !!!!!!

These things are nearly impossible to adjust for any weight lure. I have had enough "professional over runs" to last a lifetime. Yes, I did read the book about adjusting the internal spool speed control weights. I have sent them off to be adjusted and repaired with little sucess. Now, the ?yokes? are wearing out or whatever they are doing and I find that the reel has long been discountinued and parts are no longer available. Does anybody know of a reel shop that may have parts?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i had 2 us 600's.there is nothing wrong with how they cast.but i will grant you there are better reels.it's time to buy a better reel.

http://www.basspro.com/servlet/catalog.TextId?hvarTextId=85315&hvarDept=100&hvarEvent=&hvarClassCode=1&hvarSubCode=1&hvarTarget=browse

this is my next reel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GAMEOVER, you are exactly right with your comment about better reels out there for purchase. You can pay $400 or more for a reel. For those that can afford that, go for it! As far as your somewhat offensive comment about not understanding my complaint, anytime I pay over $130 plus shipping for a reel, I expect that reel to perform as advertised.

These reels dropped in price to $80 plus shipping from Bass Pro. Too bad that was AFTER I had purchased mine. I assume that was when Quantum (Zebco) decided to stop production. I guess you thought I was buying the cheap stuff when you saw the name Zebco in my first post about my problems with them. Zebco. under the name of Quantum, markets some very good quality fishing equipment and well as low end stuff. I buy what I can afford and what I feel is good quality based upon experiece, advertisments and word of mouth.

This is one of the best sites on the Internet for bass fishermen. Temper your sarcasm when you post in the future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hmmm i apologize if this is under the wrong thread but i just got the daiwa viento (a bit much for a newbie but i figure do it right the first time hopefully).  i just used it for the first time and didnt have a big problem with backlash or birds nest (really conservative settings).  however i was only successful throwing it side arm.  all my overhead casts were rock bombs.  how do you guys cast?  and would a light side arm be considered a pitch (just tryin to figure out the terminology so i dont sound dumb next time...isnt this alot of inserts lol)?  i was using about 3/8's to 1/4 oz. lures.  any suggestions or different techinques?  or is it that the better i get and the looser the settings are the further i cast? oh yeah my set up consists of the daiwa tierra mounted with a daiwa viento.  thanks for you help guys

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Reel mech  the best way to learn baitcasting is to practice.  But If your having trouble with the overhand cast  Hold your reel with the reel handles pointing toward the sky and cast it that away and try using both hands as well.  No matter what anyone tells you on how to baitcast there's still no subsitute for practice though  Worry about the basic's not distance  and the rest will come to you.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah im not looking to cast far, of course the basics need to be learned first.  however, if there coudl be further detail about how to cast over head....i guess maybe an approximate release point to reference from.  thinking back, i dont think i really even konw where to begin.  sidearm was easy to figure out, but i tried starting out light and i was still slamming the bait into the water lol.  any help woudl be appreciated.  but those were great articles to read especially on how to set them up.  thanks guys

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let whatever you are going to throw hang about 10" below your rod tip and shake it a little bit until it hits the floor. If it does't backlash that is a good place to start. After a while you can loosen things up as your thumb gets educated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Follow ReelMechs advice, then, practice,practice, practice. I use both spinning and casting but, if I had to chose one I would take a baitcaster anyday. One day it will be second nature to you. We all had to start somewhere.Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I started fishing baitcasters were all that was available. So after 60+ years I still get an ocassional over run and very infrequently,when I do something stupid, a real bonafide backlash that I takes a knife to clear.

Having said that I use a baitcaster for everything except real light baits, drop shotting and skipping. You don't have to mortgate the farm for a satisfactory bait caster. I think today's baitcasters in the $85 to $120 range will perform as needed for a very high percentage of the fisher folks.  

The secret as expressed by so many is practice, followed by practice, followed by practice. After all these years I still practice every spring before ice out. I put some targets (chalk marks) on the drivewayand if it rains I stand inside and do roll casts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a couple of pointers. for a overhead cast the most common problem is people "chop" the line off and then don't stop the spool soon enough, results bird house. you have to follow through just like with a golf swing come all the way over and point the tip of the rod at the spot you want to cast to. set the spool tension until the lure or casting plug barely spools off and stops with the rod held level and the lure hits the ground the spool stops. if you have a magnetic control start at mid range and as you improve you can loosen things up for a longer cast. another thing when casting overhead rotate your hand till the reel is on its side this way the spool will set against the side and not "float" like it does holding it level.......remember follow through ...never change directions of the rod once you start or you will back lash. before you know it you will develope a "sixth sense" and be able to feel how hard you can cast under different conditions......hope this helps

Slug-go's rule....Danny

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I cast with my right arm and reel with my right BUT i can say this i been using BC reels for 20 yrs and i still get a few back lashes it happens then agian i can get most out within 5 seconds also they all seem to b the same kind of backlash LOL if that makes sense during this time i have learned to cast anyway thought possible with a BC laying down even ,up trees , backwards, with a broke arm  with a broke finger...  like REELMECH says practice pratice pratice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to touch on land practice the reason some do better on water is that water gives when stopping the lure land doesn't.So therefore the line stops faster on land than water and the spool just keeps on going and going and going.(Think battery Bunny) :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×