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Siebert Outdoors

T-storms and bass fishing

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Since we are coming upon the thunderstorm season I thought this would be a good question.

 Typically how do bass react to thunderstorms.  Whats your experience with them.

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For me, the worse the conditions the better the fishing....minus lightning.

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right before a thunderstorm, there is a feeding fenzy.  im talkin like something that lasts for like 30 minutes, and its over.  you know how u can sense a storm coming.  u can feel it in there air.  when bass can to, and they feast right before.  and then go into lockjaw during and after the storm for a little while.  i beleive it has to do with the lightnin affecting pressure, rapid changes in barometric pressure, heavy influx of water, etc.  but if u can find the fish right before a thunderstorm, u are likely to catch a numbers, and a big fish.  the 12lber i caught earlier this year was right before a massive storm, when i was realin it in, it wa hailing.  

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yeah I forgot to say dont fish in lightning, not a real good  idea

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I'm with senko77 right before one is the best time  of course unless you see lighting. But just a warning I seen on a show that lighting can strike 3 or 4 miles ahead of the storm as well   I have caught alot before a storm but I don't stay out very long I ain't taken any chances the fish will be there after might not be biteing but be there

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I've seen a lot of cases where rain seems to turn the fish ON and I don't mind getting wet after all you can only get so wet, right? But if you can see or hear lightning you are within range of a bolt. I just do not take a chance with that type of voltage. He who runs away lives to fish another day.  There are even units out that detect lightning before you can. Since I had a friend growing up who's father was killed by lightning I give it the respect it is due.

:-?

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I've got to be honest, I love to catch bass, but under no circumstances will I stay on the water if lightning is in the area. With that said, I have had good times before storms but never have I fished through a thunderstorm. If I see lightning or hear thunder I'm runnin'  :o

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Guest avid

When the barometer first starts to fall can be a trigger for a really active bite.  I like it when the wind kicks up and the rain starts.  I think it cools the water (usually a good thing in SE Fla.) and oxegenates it.  I admit to fishing in lightning so long as it's not rolling directly in on me.  I know this is not smart but I stay close to shore and am no where near being the tallest object.  I love thunderstorms.  They are so..............energizing.  Very cool to watch and experience from the water.  But when the lightning starts getting close or really active, I'll wait it out under one of the three bridges on my lake.

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Right with senko and avid...the barometer and oncoming storm makes for a heck of a ride in a short time.   THEN, take a fast ride to the ramp and trailer.

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Like everyone else has said,the falling barometer that comes with a thunderstorm really gets the bass to hitting,but when I see lightning I'm gone.

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I also agree with senko77 on this.  Some of the best bass fishing i've ever had is during a light drizzle just before the storm really started.  I have never caught a big one before a storm, but lots of fish.  

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I agree with everyone else, there's often a real nice bite during the leading edge of a storm.

When it begins to lightning and thunder though, I turn my hat backwards,

assume a low crouching position and replace overhead casting with side casting JUST KIDDIN' :)

Roger

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Hey, Avid:  no matter WHERE you are on a lake, YOU are the tallest object thereabouts.  And even if it should strike a tree on shore, you're still likely to take a big hit.  I used to live in Florida, where lightning kills over 100 people a year, mostly golfers, thank goodness, and I once stood on  the beach admiring an incoming white squall.  Suddenly I realized how stupid I was.  That sucker was really moving.  Ever seen an old guy run in hip boots?  Very funny.

::)

---------------------------

Take a kid fishing.  You might learn something.

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Guest ouachitabassangler

Around here when it thunders bass nose dive into the heaviest vegetation around, or if they can will go to the bottom of a channel. If the low pressure comes in with rain only that can produce some fantastic fishing. Lightning begins closing it down, and the thunder ends it. If the pressure remains low after the storm passes great fishing often resumes. But when pressure starts back up the bite falls off from the peak around a storm. Most of that information is useless to me if it looks like any lightning is possible, fishing out of an aluminum Bass Tracker and using mostly graphite rods which serve as lightning antennas. I might have been born at night, but not yesterday....  :P  Jim

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Agree that bass turn on just before a storm hits, or as it passes by. Reminds me of a time when a buddy and I were on a lake a bit north of the Mexican border in Arizona in July. We were paddling a 12' rowboat around and fishing when a monster storm comes up. It pours rain and the lightnening crashes down, we get off the lake--but the rain/hail smacks us so hard so we finally gave up and sat under the upturned aluminum boat as the lightening cracked down around us--smoking cigarettes and resigned to our fate.

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Growing up fishing from the banks of the river with live bait on the bottom, we always noticed that a thunderstorm turned the fish on. You could leave your line in the water and either sit in a car or stand under the railroad bridge a few feet away when the storm hit. Of course the smart people would pack up and leave. We'd stay and risk our lives for stinking catfish and after the storms the fishing usually dropped off.

 Looking back, I wouldn't recommend it and I try to get off the water and in a vehicle as soon as I hear thunder or see distant lightning.

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Four or five years ago on Easter Sunday I had enough of my in-laws and went fishing at a local club that I belong to.  The lakes on his club are old sand quarries.  No weeks grow to speak of but there is lots of timber on the shores and drop-offs, holes, etc..  The water temp was in the high 40's.  I began fishing the typical jig and pig very slowly and really worked hard for a couple small fish.  I was acutally getting bored/frustrated and thinking that I should have waited a couple weeks until the water temps rose a bit.  The skies just started turning gray and the wind was picking up.  Obviously the barometer was dropping and a storm was on it's way.  I had just bought my first fiberglass cranking stick and wanted to play with it.  I tied on a Storm Wart and hung a four pounder on the first cast.  I caught fish on almost every cast for over an hour.  I caught 5 fish over 5 pounds that afternoon.   That is respectable for this club and in this area of the country for that matter.  I left before the rain started, but when it did start, it really rained.  I have experienced similar things may times since, but that day taught me something.  Sometimes just because the cows are laying down does not me anything.

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Well the results are in,  after fishing after 3 t storms in 3 days here is what I found

after the 1st, fishing was good with the stained water the fish pulled shallow

after the 2nd the fish were still shallow and the water was muddy

after the 3rd the fish had enough and wouldnt bite

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Senko77 hit it right on the head.  Whenever I fish right before a storm, I notice the pond is like an ocean with all those bass feeding.  Once I leave when the storm rolls in, the bass have stopped feeding right as I pack up my things.  Some of the neat things about the sport we love.

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I usually get great bass bites before a storm or a little after.  If I am 30-40 minutes from my ramp I will usually ride it out in the best place around if posible. (in a passing storm not a monster with huge winds) If not, why worry about what you can't change.  Better chance of hitting the lottery..so they say.  I think I will worry more about getting hit in the truck on my way to the fishing hole than the lighning.  I sometimes have great fishing all day long after a cooling storm on a hot summers day.  Or warm rains during the colder pre spring wheather in Ky.

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