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Guest avid

carolina rig - speed

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Guest avid

I never liked carolina rigs because I really enjoy pitching and casting.  but circumstances are such right now that Carolina rig fishing is definitly in order.

My question is GENERALLY speaking how fast will you fish it.  I know you need to let fish tell you and all that sensible wisdom, but I'm talking about in general.  Is a slow steady retrieve reliably succesful? or is the drag and pause method the typical method that most anglers find succesful?

thanks

avid

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or is the drag and pause method

thats the method I use and I typically fish it slow.  Let the bait sit for anywhere from a few seconds to 10

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im no master crigger but the way i do it is to fish it by dragging the tip pointed towards the water slowly but covering a fair amount of water until i feel... anything.  when i start feeling a brushpile or log or anything else i slow way down and sometimes will stop pointing the rod at the water as i very slowly work whatever cover i have found.  i never move the line with the reel only pick up slack after the drags.

matt

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"Drag and pause" is the method I normally use. The speed I move it varies along with the length of the pause. Sometimes the pause is only the time it takes to reel down for the next drag; I always use the rod to move the rig-not the reel.

Sometimes just "strolling" the bait along as you drift with the wind will work-a very lazy method that will catch fish.

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Until the fish say otherwise, I fish it about like a t-rig, as far as speed and distance moved per move.

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Avid,

    Great article in the JUly/Aug BassMaster issue on C-rigging.    Short take on the article was.   One pro called it a quitters rig the other opposite.

In general, it said this time of the year, to target fatter fish, move the bait faster, because fatter fish are active fish due to feeding.   Thus they have shad bellies pouching out.     The slower movement pulls lighter fish because they need it that slow to be interested.

Food for thought.   This is something I will monitor and ask a few of my guide friends to watch also.   Its something I have never thought of to consider before.

Any body else read the article, please add some keypoints I might not have mentioned.

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Guest the_muddy_man

Hey Avid this is my quest this summer to learn how to C rig I just got some Lindy Sinkers b/c the lake I fish mostly has a rocky area holding bass in the summer, and the egg and barrell sinkers snag a lot

 Anyway my friend Gene is excellent at this and he said to drag it until your sure you are onto whatever structure you are targeting Then he give it a few pretty decent tugs then he goes to the drag and pull Ive been watchin him for a while unfortunatly Im not getting this yet

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Guest the_muddy_man

Hey Bassnut can you help me out here b/c Im looking for an approach to this I can use  How slow is slow?

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I usually drag and pause.  I drag with a sweeping motion and I try to remember that the 7'6" rod is moving a lot of line with that motion. So I typically drag slowly.  Reel up the slack and drag again.  I typically do not pause for long.  I use the c-rig to cover a lot of water.   8-)

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Well you have to use a slow gear ratio reel 5to1 and  just keep it going just enough to keep it moving. Really it's something you have to experiment with it's hard to explain

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I do not consider myself experienced on the C-rig but thanks to many fellow members here and all of the good advice I received ( ;)), I am confident that you will catch fish with the drag and pause method. I like to jerk it or tug it twice to get the bait back higher in the water and create a little erratic action like a senko of fluke, then I let it settle and fall for about 10 seconds, then I repeat and jerk or tug two to three times. Nothing hard, just moving the rod tip about 8-12 inces.

I like the idea of fat fish vs. slow fish. I want to just catch fish so, I'll stick with slow since the fish locally are very picky.

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Janalon's explanation is right on.  I use the C-Rig alot throughout the year.  I can't say I agree with Bassnut's  preference for the slower reel (5:1) especially if you use the drag and pause method.  You can get burned by the fish that hit  your bait and run at you.  Most people who throw the C-rig extensively, make long casts that require quick line pick-up when getting hits at those distances.  I have tried the slower reel years ago for more "winching" power, but realized that it is not necessary at those distances with that length of rod (7+ feet).  My way is not the only way, but is the most efficient way I have tried to date.  Happy C-rigging!

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Janalon's explanation is right on. I use the C-Rig alot throughout the year. I can't say I agree with Bassnut's preference for the slower reel (5:1) especially if you use the drag and pause method. You can get burned by the fish that hit your bait and run at you. Most people who throw the C-rig extensively, make long casts that require quick line pick-up when getting hits at those distances. I have tried the slower reel years ago for more "winching" power, but realized that it is not necessary at those distances with that length of rod (7+ feet). My way is not the only way, but is the most efficient way I have tried to date. Happy C-rigging!

I fish small ponds and lakes so I'm not really geting into the distance issue but I can see your point if I was out on a boat and making longer casts.  I have found that the fish in the waters I fish want it at  a painfully slow speed and thats why I suggested a lower ratio reel  I was thinking about my fishing conditions and that was my mistake.  Muddy I'm sorry I couldn't give a good explanation I'm better at reading about something and applying it than I am at explaining something to someone I'm not a good teacher.  I have found what makes things like this easier for me is to stay at it untill I find what works and then duplicate it.   Really it's Imo something that will come to you and when it does you will think its easy.  Don't give up

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Point taken, Bassnut.  Different presentations for different conditions.  Marks of a true fisherman. ;)

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I drag it 1-2ft. at the time and then pause it long enough to let the lure sink back to the botton and rest for a second or two.  If I bump some cover with the sinker I'll shorten the length of my drags and slow it down a little more.  This allows me to fish the high percentage areas a little more thoroughly, and it allows me to feel my way through the cover, so I don't hang up as much.

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Guest ouachitabassangler

My range of speed is from crawling 6" a minute followed by a little jerk (maybe) to continuous travel a foot a second.

Jim

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I make a full drag length of the rod then i'll reel in the slack pointing the tip of the rod toward the bait then drag again.  I think while reeling in the slack is sufficient time in between drags, when I use a trick worm as a bait sometimes i'll shake the tip of the rod on a taught line in between drags.  Usually use this technique when fish are finicky.

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Guest ouachitabassangler

We have a C-rig sticky thread on top covering plenty about this, but for now I'll add some here, maybe repetitive. Let's assume you wish to present a worm to bass. You can also whacky rig it, T-rig, drop shot, float it weightless, deadstick it, troll it under a float, all sorts of ways to fish it. It must be fished the way bass want it to catch bass. If they want to study it for 5 minutes in one spot, then let them. All the methods and more I mentioned have different applications that match depth, mood, water conditions, bottom conditions, etc. I think it's a big mistake to fish a C-rig a particular way, as though trying to force bass to take it on your terms. The C-rig is a fine way to move a worm at any required speed, for all practical purposes limited only in height above bottom by leader length. You can only sling so much leader. You can deadsdtick a worm with it or power fish a lake, or anywhere in between. So it pays to experiment with retrieves to find the best presentation, accepting whatever speed bass demand, or go mostly fishless on the rig. Of course eventually you might catch a bass fishing it one way, but you won't win tournaments doing that. Be flexible. Not only does speed sampling matter, but so does angle of attack, dragging it up slope then down slope, then across slope, etc.  Precision of placement of the rig is another important factor. Often a bass requires a bait coming within inches before reacting to it. Since bass relate so much to stumps, rocks, brush, etc., the rig needs to find those hiding places. Mining a lake bottom with the rig is frequently a big waste of time. You are better off locating prime cover/structure and putting the rig exactly on it. Use the electronics, find lone targets, and zero in on the best most likely targets, changing speed, adding jerks, jumps, jiggling, crawling non-stop, or letting it do nothing for minutes at a time. Use as little sinker as needed, more in wind and current, less in calm clear water.

Jim

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I like to drag and pause. I usually drag it at the speed a minnow would swin while foraging. I leave that bait just sit long enough to take up slack. This has worked well for me with salamander baits and flat tailed worms.

Matt Fly made a point regarding the size of fish that peaks my interest in looking at my technique. The bass I catch with my standard retrieve are usually 12 to 16 inches long. No smaller, no bigger. Interesting. Thanks Matt. I'll be doing things a little different to see if I get some changes in fish size.

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My range of speed is from crawling 6" a minute followed by a little jerk (maybe) to continuous travel a foot a second.

Jim

6" a minute!! :o MAN! That's slow. You have more patience than Job! :D I bet it works for you though. Makes me want to give it a try. If I know fish are there and they're just not biting, that sounds like a good torture presentation. Stick it in their face till they bite! ;D

By the way, since I've been posting here at BassResource.com I have learned to keep it simple as a novice angler and now I have learned that there are many different variations of the c-rig from brass bead knockers to all kinds of rig tricks and customization for rattles, etc.  I am now determined to make the c-rig a vital part of my fishing techniques.  Start with the basics, master it, and then move on to a new type while having an ace in your back pocket that you know you can catch fish on a slow day.

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"Drag and pause" is the method I normally use. The speed I move it varies along with the length of the pause. Sometimes the pause is only the time it takes to reel down for the next drag; I always use the rod to move the rig-not the reel.

Sometimes just "strolling" the bait along as you drift with the wind will work-a very lazy method that will catch fish.

Exactly what K Mac said!

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Guest ouachitabassangler

JB, 6" a minute sometimes might be too fast. When I think there's a little current, I mean very slight, that can impart just the right movement to a finesse worm, while if you jerk it you can spook large bass. It's about the same as deadsticking a worm, just letting it sit in a spot until it gets eaten, where you just "know" there's a bass after seeing a dorsal fin or hearing a flop. That's particularly effective sight fishing spawning bass or a male guarding a bed, and you've seen a bass there. If the bass spooks, leave the C-rig bait there until the bass returns. It will have forgotten how it got on the bed, and be more apt to take it. In that case, even 6" of travel can take the bait off the sweet spot the bass will not tolerate a threat in. I'll move it 6" if I think I'm not on that spot. Then 10 minutes later another 6".

Jim

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