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gjones2397

Florida Strian Bass (Very hard to catch)

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My neighbor has a lake / pond, about 5 acres, and it was stocked with Florida strain bass about 8 years ago. Usually, I am the only one that fishes the lake. Most of time, nobody can catch fish out of the lake. I get lucky because I am so persistent and stay out there on the water for hours and somedays not even get a bite (most of the days). I know the latest craze in the past was to stock with Florida bass, because they grew bigger. And I have heard that they are harder to catch, and have read that the older the fish gets, the harder the Florida strian bass is to catch.

I have read articles of people believing that there were no fish in their ponds, until they drained it and found that there were huge bass in lake or pond. On some days, I will leave the lake and think, "man there aren't any fish in here". I can fish for hours and throw a variety of lures with no luck. I fish with 4 reels, all with different lures, and can throw anything from plastic worm, spinnerbait, buzz bait, crank bait and have no luck.

I have read that I may have better luck with live bait, but no-one has suggested a live bait to try. Minnows, crawfish,.....? When I was younger and my dad would take me fishing, he would catch bull frogs. But, he also taught me to clean a fish by scaling with a spoon. >:(

Does anyone have a suggestion on a bait to try, or a presentation. At this point, I am willing to try almost anything.

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Are you primarily a shallow water fishermen?

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First off, welcome to the forum. Second, im not sure that "Florida Bass" get bigger or are harder to catch, that may just be a myth. i WILL suggest to try some live bait though, if your not against it.

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Well if Florida Bass is harder to catch that makes me feel better! Thats all I fish for being that Im in Florida.

If your going to try a live bait, try using wild shiners. Your local bait shop should have some.

Geroge will clue us all in on if Florida Strain will grow larger and more difficult to catch. He seems to be the authority on this kind of thing.

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Welcome to the forum gjones ;)

What you've read is very true, Florida-strain bass do grow larger than northern-strain bass,

and the Florida-strain is a less aggressive fish.

As for your temporary difficulty with bass, I'd suggest that you hang around

and read the member posts. I'm sure that before too long, you'll be able to put a pattern together.

Best of Luck

Roger

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I primarily fish shallow water.  

I don't know if I can get shiners in around here or not. I am in North Mississippi. I never use live bait, so I don't know what to use or how to present the live bait.

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Welcome aboard!

I've seen a few pictures of the Florida bass George Welcome and his guests catch on a regular basis. Yes, they are big and some are huge! He catches the vast majority (maybe all of them) on artificial lures. So, it can be done, but experience and skill come into play and specific locations may be important, too.  

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Welcome aboard!

I've seen a few pictures of the Florida bass George Welcome and his guests catch on a regular basis. Yes, they are big and some are huge! He catches the vast majority (maybe all of them) on artificial lures. So, it can be done, but experience and skill come into play and specific locations may be important, too.

I will give you that experience and skill play a big part. I am no expert, but have been fishing since I was a young kid. I can catch bass (what I believe to be Northern bass) fairly consistently. Has anyone noticed a different pattern technique, lures or possible presentation that is more effective between one strain and the other.

I firmly believe that there is a difference in the strike pattern and aggressiveness between the two strains, until enough people tell me different. Let me give you more examples of how the fishing goes in this particular lake/pond. I can go fishing, lets say 10 times. Six times that I go, I may not even get a bite. Two times, I may catch one fish each trip. And one time, I may catch three or four fish ranging from 3lb - 8lb. For instance, the last good day that I had at this lake, I caught 3 pounder, one or two casts later I caught 8 pounder, and couple casts later I caught 5 pounder. I don't keep any fish, I always throw the fish back immediately.

And some of the straglers that I manage to catch on the bad days (most of the time) vary between .5 to 1.5 lbs.  So, I know the fish are thriving and reproducing. Just can't catch.  

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Not knowing where you are located, it is hard to say that pure Florida strain bass will live longer and grow bigger then northerns. You might be in Michigan or Illinois etc. If so, those Florida's will probably die off and not live very long. However, in the south or central states It is a fact that Florida strain bass grow larger, live longer and are tougher to catch then their northern strain cousins.

I have fished waters that contained nothing but northern strain in Texas and believe me it was incredible. Florida strain bass are effected more highly with weather conditions also such as dropping or rising barometric pressure. Do a search on Google about Northern Strain and Florida Strain it will point out some articles from experts that agree with this assesment.

This is a good read: http://www.noble.org/Ag/Wildlife/Bass/WILDBASS.html

Welcome aboard.

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I would find live CRAWFISH!  Other live baits would be shiners, earthworms, and waterdogs.

Be versatile, use both live bait and artificials. Know when and how to use artificials, learn

the same about live bait. The Florida strain can be more difficult, but you can master this

problem. There is alot of good information, and different techniques and tips on this forum.

Visit it often, and WELCOME to BR!

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Try putting some shiners out there and see what happens.

There are no facts when it comes to bass. As quickly as you state one, someone will come along and show you how wrong you are. Bass don't live by rules other than the ever changing ones that they make up.

Fishermen live by facts and rules, whether they be made up by someone else or by themselves. I so disagree with the tougher to catch theory. I do agree that they are more difficult to hook until you get it through your head that you need to set the hook on anything that feels different. There is no waiting or counting with Florida strain bass.

Weather affects both strains of bass and it is real handy to be able to blame it when we aren't catching. The moon was too full, the sun too high, the barometer too low, the barometer too high. Most often however, the fish weren't there, or the bait chosen was wrong.

Your choice: the fish aren't there, or the bait you are using was wrong for the moment. Use some wild shiners and you will find out if the fish are there.

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I noticed that longevity was also mentioned.

With respect to "lifespan", the northern-strain bass lives longer than the Florida-strain,

significantly longer.

The world-record largemouth bass was presumed to have been

an "intergrade" bass, a natural cross between a Florida-strain & northern-strain bass.

Intergrade bass occur naturally in northern Florida and southern Georgia,

where the gene pool provides a favorable combination of fast growth and long life.

Roger

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Roger,

What's the significant difference? Florida strain: 13+-/Northern strain: 13+-

The Georgia bass had to be an intergrade or transplanted.

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Roger,

What's the significant difference? Florida strain: 13+ /Northern strain: 13+

Due to their faster growth rate, there are exponentially more 13-lb Florida-strain bass.

Although a 13-lb northern-strain bass is possible, her weight would be more age-related.

That is to say, she may be growing slower, but she is growing for a greater number of years.

Roger

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how long have you been fishing in this lake?

I have been fishing the lake for about 3 or 4 years. And the lake has always been hard to catch fish.

Someone replied an didn't know where I lived. I live in Northern Mississippi.

I have seen several suggestions to use shiners. I will have to read up on a good presentation for shiners. I have little or no experience with live bait.

I am new to this forum and I have learned so much within this first day of reading posts and replies. There is such a difference in opinions about bass fishing across the readers of these forums. Everyone has a differenct view and brings something unique to the table.

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Ok follow your own statement....

1- I firmly believe that there is a difference in the strike pattern and aggressiveness between the two strains, until enough people tell me different.

if you believe this to be true then it is. No matter what others tell you, others my influnce your thoughts but you will only second guess yourself untill you believe different!!

2- Let me give you more examples of how the fishing goes in this particular lake/pond. I can go fishing, lets say 10 times.

If you fished 10 times you should have a fishing log.

I bet if you did you would find you caught the most fish on same moon/weather conditions

3- Six times that I go, I may not even get a bite. Two times, I may catch one fish each trip. And one time, I may catch three or four fish ranging from 3lb - 8lb. For instance, the last good day that I had at this lake, I caught 3 pounder, one or two casts later I caught 8 pounder, and couple casts later I caught 5 pounder. I don't keep any fish, I always throw the fish back immediately.  

I bet if you had a log you would find your own pattern as to why you did or did not catch fish and what type fish is going to be expected on what day reguardless of the moon/weather conditions .

I do believe that warm all green colored bass are less aggressive during  cooler temps. and for me the same is true with bronze backs in warmer waters.

with this being said I also think fish must feed to survive so look around find warmmer water. (mud flats,Rocks or even burried deep in a weed bed, for the green ones...and for  the smallies go deeper or find current as current provides oxygen and that inturn makes cooler temps.

So as you can see knowing what I know (or believe) will make me to fish differently on different days.

Your log will give you belief and make you a better fisherman. JMO.

hope this helped

Dale

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Roger,

I meant that the FL. strain is expected to live 13+- years, and the Northern strain is expected to live 13+- years, so what is the significant difference in longevity?

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I had always understood that Northern strain bass live longer than Floridas. As in, Floridas might live 10 to 13, where as a Northern should easily live 13, with 20 being possible. In fact, I have read (in In-Fisherman) of a Northern Strain Bass being caught in New York (I believe it was) that was well over 30 years old.

In any case, regardless of whether the bass is a Northern, or a Florida strain, studies have shown that bass which grow "too fast" (unlimited food, and very warm water) tend to experience "burnout", and won't live as long, as bass which have slower growth rates...... Hence the reason So Cal has produced a good handful of 20 plus fish, yet the biggest "certified" from Mexico, was 'only' a 19-10.

But to answer the original question, In my personal experience, Florida bass are tougher to catch than Northerns..... Or should I say, they bite less often out of a "knee jerk" reaction, and will more likely investigate a meal more closely, before committing to eat it.

But none the less, there is "no such thing" as an uncatchable bass :-)

Peace,

Fish

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Roger,

I meant that the FL. strain is expected to live 13+- years, and the Northern strain is expected to live 13+- years, so what is the significant difference in longevity?

i think George and Chris got it nailed on this ...

Havn't yall noticed that skinny people live longer than fat people ...

I think it's the same for bass ,,,in the south they have a longer growing season so they mature faster ..

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No doubt about it in my mind that the intergrades (F-1 hybrid) has different feeding habits and is more affected by fronts. Unless transplanted and isolated from any northern genes I dont think there are any pure Florida bass except in South Florida. I once fished a pond that had what was susposed to be pure Florida bass that had been brought to Georgia and I found them to be extemely difficult to catch after a front. I fish a bunch of different lakes. Some have only northern strain and others have the intergrade. In tough conditions the northern strain lakes have more catchable fish than the lakes with the F-1.  Northern strain bass also have a larger strike zone and will move a longer distance to hit a bait than the F-1. Of course all of this is just based on my personal experience and observation. I have no idea what the scientific reason is and have never found anyone who could really tell me.

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There are pure Florida strain bass in many locations of this country. However, given time and recruitment, in not a lot of time the intergrade, (F1) will outnumber the pure Florida strain. In Florida the delineation is relatively clear and follows what is know as the weather line. This line runs just south of Melbourne, Florida west to Tampa. Stick Marsh/Farm 13 sits just south of that line.

Jan. 2000- Shaw Grigsby wins Toho with 53-11. This was on a hard cold front with winds in the 40's.

DCP_1182.jpg

Think this was a cold hard front period.

DCP_0606.JPG

Cold front accompanied by high winds.

DCP_859.JPG

Another one of those cold front windy days.

Fronts affect us far more than they do the fish - weather in general affects us more than the fish. If you think that weather has adverse affects of Florida strain bass than you already have two strikes against you and are quickly headed for the third strike and out.

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There are pure Florida strain bass in many locations of this country. However, given time and recruitment, in not a lot of time the intergrade, (F1) will outnumber the pure Florida strain. In Florida the delineation is relatively clear and follows what is know as the weather line. This line runs just south of Melbourne, Florida west to Tampa. Stick Marsh/Farm 13 sits just south of that line.

I've always based the line of demarcation on lakes rather than cities, which from all

appearances runs from Tarpon Lake near the Gulf coast to Cypress Lake

in the Kissimmee Chain. George and I are on the same page, because if cities were used,

the Florida-strain line would run from Tarpon Springs to Melbourne.

Along with several other behemoths, Lake Tarpon has produced the former

uncertified Florida bass record weighing 19 lbs even (surely a pure Florida-strain).

With respect to bass longevity, I'm afraid George and I part company.

Like most fish and animals, the highest percentage of bass die within their first year of life.

Among the precious few Florida-strain bass surpassing the age of 8, about forty percent

are expected to die within 1 year and 90% will be dead within 2 years (10 years old).

To be sure, there's the occasional bass that reaches 12 years of age, which is popularly

accepted as the age ceiling for pure Florida-strain bass.

As Fish Chris and I have stated, northern-strain bass live significantly longer

than Florida-strain bass. The age ceiling for northern-strain bass is about 16 years,

or about 33% longer than Florida-strain bass. There is more than one account

of a northern bass living longer than 20 years. I also read about that 30-year old

northern-strain bass in the In-Fisherman magazine, but I can't recall the details.

Roger

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