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I was recently told that round reels are easier to use when pitching. I don't palm a reel, so holding it isn't an issue. I would like to hear from others who have used both round and low profile reels for pitching to contribute.

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I have both, actually last weekend I was pitching a jig with a calcutta 200 and pitching soft plastics with a coronach. I like using both, but if I was forced to pick just one I'd pick a low profile reel for overall comfort and weight

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I've used both.....Honestly, light weight and ergonomics matter a bunch so I prefer a low profile reel. And I say that being a VERY recent convert to low pros. As in the last 3-4 years or so.

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I seem to find myself pitching with every reel I own in certain circumstances. My dedicated pitching and flipping reels are round.

Ronnie

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I have used both. The larger round reels however, cause me to get some pain/tingling/hand falling asleep symptoms in my hand. Due to this I don't use round reels anymore. I actually have a brand new Abu C4 lefty that was a gift last Christmas that I can't seem to sell, it just sits on my shelf doing nothing.

Cliff

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I use reels that were designed for that purpose, though I will pitch with any rod and reel, if it gets the bait where I think it will get bit. The special reels are more comfortable for all day use, though.

IMG3783-crop-M.jpg

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The Daiwa design is the lesser of evils but over all I find flipping switches to be a weak link in other reels and more trouble than they're worth. Lefty is now a must for me though.

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The Daiwas above aren't "automatic" or redundant like other designs, that I agree, are weak links. They simply move the release to the top of the reel, but at the cost of two small idler gears to get the main gear out of the way. Those two reels have been work horses for me.

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I use a Core 100MgFV, which has the modified thumb bar that allows you to engage the reel without having to turn the handle. Great pitching and overall heavy cover reel. I also heard rumors that Shimano is getting rid of the 100 MgFV from their line-up, which I hope is a false rumor.

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RW, you keep killin' me talking about this reel! I went to a few places in Memphis last week and didn't see one. I guess that's a good thing because if I found one, my wife would still be beating me. This one is gonna hafta be under the radar.

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I have had both but prefer the low profile for pitching for comfort and because I like the higher speeds that you can get with low profile reels.

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Never understood why they call it a flippin switch. Seems it should be called a pitching switch being this is the technique you would use it for.

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curado e7

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Low profile for me. I palm the reel and feel I have more control in the pitching motion. I want light, super smooth and, as mentioned, high speed. Brand is up to you. Lots of great options out there.

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Never understood why they call it a flippin switch. Seems it should be called a pitching switch being this is the technique you would use it for.

Actually, you would use it more for flipping. Flipping is a two handed cast. If you have one hand pulling line off the reel (the slack for the initial flip) and one hand holding the rod, then what hand reengages the spool? That's what the flipping switch is for.

When you are pitching, its as simple as using a reel with a handle on the opposite side that you cast with. You still have a free hand while pitching, since it's a one handed cast.

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Actually, you would use it more for flipping. Flipping is a two handed cast. If you have one hand pulling line off the reel (the slack for the initial flip) and one hand holding the rod, then what hand reengages the spool? That's what the flipping switch is for.

When you are pitching, its as simple as using a reel with a handle on the opposite side that you cast with. You still have a free hand while pitching, since it's a one handed cast.

When I'm flipping I do not engage/dis engage the spool unless adjusting the amount of line I have out so I guess it would benefit there when doing so.

Not being a smart **** just trying to understand the true benefit of the switch. So basically when flipping and I need to let additional line out I would not have to turn the reel handle to engage the spool after doing so. I can see where that would help. I flip with a left handed reel and usually when I let extra line out I quickly turn the reel handle a bit when the slack is out my line that was in my left hand so I guess it's not much of pain for me. If I flipped with a right hander I would have to switch the rod to my left hand just to re engage the spool by turning the reel handle then switch back. That would be a pain.

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If I flipped with a right hander I would have to switch the rod to my left hand just to re engage the spool by turning the reel handle then switch back. That would be a pain.

Thus, the flipping switch was born. Not everyone uses a lefty reel.

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When I'm flipping I do not engage/dis engage the spool unless adjusting the amount of line I have out so I guess it would benefit there when doing so.

You just said it right there ;)

Flipping switch allows you to engage the thumb bar to pull some line out, and then re-engages the spool without having to touch the handles.

But anyways, I have used both for flipping. My first reel that I bought, and used as a dedicated flipping rig was an Abu Garcia C4 5601, and it didn't take me long to replace it with a low profile reel. It was definitely strong, and it worked just fine. But it was heavy, and made the combo feel unbalanced and clumsy.

I know there are much better round bodies out there than the C4's, but low profile reels are easier to handle.

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