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joeyfishes

One Rod: Braid Or Mono?

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I have a Shimano Caenan 100 6.5:1 baitcasting reel paired up with a Abu Garcia 7'0 Vengeance. I have to change my line and cannot choose between braid or mono. I have been using mono. In my area, soft plastics, topwater (poppers and frogs) and jigs are primarily used. I know there are cons to braid such as messing up the rod guides, cutting, visibility, so on. But I have heard some pros such as strength. I don't want to spend my time on the water fixing birds nests, fixing tangles so on. Which should I choose. Oh and this rod is the only bass rod I have. Thanks. 

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I would look at Yo-Zuri Hybrid line. Tough, durable, abrasion resistant and very manageable.

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I would look at Yo-Zuri Hybrid line. Tough, durable, abrasion resistant and very manageable.

This! I recently had the same decision to make and tried it out and holy smokes I am impressed so far.

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The co-poly lines are a good way to go, but don't let the myths about braid cutting guides sway you. Modern braids and guides make this pretty much a non-issue. 50# braid is easy to manage and you can always add leaders where appropriate. When you do get the occasional backlash just be sure not to yank on it or you'll be respooling sooner rather than later.

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If poppers are one of your primary baits, I would not suggest a co-poly. I have tried to fish poppers on a co-poly, it is not fun. If you fish them slow, by the 4th or 5th pop the line has sunk and the cast is ruined. 

 

I would instead suggest a heavy braid. A heavy braid will float enough to work well with poppers. I would suggest a 50 or 65# braid, especially since you said plastics and jigs also. 

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I would go with braid and then learn to tie a leader.  Which basically lets you switch between lines when the need arises.  The only application where this does not work for me is on my crankbait setup where I feel the added stretch of mono helps my hookup ratio and keeps the hooks from tearing out of the fish. 

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#40 Power Pro. It has the diameter of #10 mono and is very manageable. I keep it on most of my reels. If the need comes I will add 5-6 ft of 10-12 lb floro leader.. 

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 I know there are cons to braid such as messing up the rod guides, cutting, visibility, so on.

 

Yeah, all that crap is BS.  I have used braid for years on new and old rods and it does not damage guides.  i have fished braid and mono side by side and not noticed any problems with visibility.  In other words, often my boat partner uses mono or vice versa and there is no difference. 

 

Use whatever you want but Braid is awesome.  you can have all the strength you want in a much smaller line.

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I've been a longstanding mono user and, despite experimenting with braid, I haven't seen a reason to change.

 

I'm basically a single-rod kinda fisherman.  And, in that vein, mono still seems to be (IMHO) the best, all-around compromise line.  As I said in another thread, I'm fishing 8lb test mono on a M/H spinning setup as my main rod (cranks, dropshot, weightless and weighted soft plastics) and haven't had a problem detecting strikes or setting the hook even when making long casts and getting 'immediate' hits.  Sure, the line stretches, but it's not a rubber band.

 

This year, I wanted to start jig fishing seriously.  So, I added a MH/F spinning reel spooled with 12lb Trilene-XL.  So far, I've pitched into nasty stuff and horsed a couple decent fish out.  I've also hooked the cover and been able to get my jig back without the line breaking.  It just seems like I can get most of the performance I could ever need out of mono.

 

Two things, though, in the interest of full disclosure:  First, I like the idea of having to work to land a fish.  In other words, fishing with 40lb braid and really heavy tackle doesn't appeal to me on the surface, anyway.  I'd rather have a little more sport in my fishing - not just in terms of location, but in terms of the fight.  

 

Second, I *am* going to experiment with braid again to see if I change my tune.  Right now, the barrier is that I'm having too much fun learning to fish out of my kayak to worry about another test.  And, with the weather in the northeast like it is so far, I would rather capitalize on just being on the water and fishing what I know.

 

 

Braid may likely be the 'right', or even 'best', choice.  But, FWIW, I think using mono is a more viable alternative than most of the static online suggests.   Good luck.  And be sure to post your experiences so we can all learn from them!

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Thanks everyone. I will probably go with Power Pro or SpiderWire EZ Braid in 50# or 65#. I wasn't sure if the rod guide cutting was true since I read an article on Bass Resource that said it was. Ha. For backing, should I use tape or mono? 

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Yeah, all that crap is BS.  I have used braid for years on new and old rods and it does not damage guides. 

Use whatever you want but Braid is awesome.  you can have all the strength you want in a much smaller line.

 

 

That itself is also BS. I have ruined two tips from using braid. These were on cheaper fenwick eagle and HMX rods. The braid cut slices in the guide and pretty much ruined them, any time pressure was added it frayed up the line terribly. I'm not saying to not use braid, as I use it a lot also... just don't use it on any cheaper rods. 

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That itself is also BS. I have ruined two tips from using braid. These were on cheaper fenwick eagle and HMX rods. The braid cut slices in the guide and pretty much ruined them, any time pressure was added it frayed up the line terribly. I'm not saying to not use braid, as I use it a lot also... just don't use it on any cheaper rods. 

Well, I guess if it happened to you then I can't argue with it.  I have braid on several cheap rods and have never seen this happen. 

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I've been a longstanding mono user and, despite experimenting with braid, I haven't seen a reason to change.

 

I'm basically a single-rod kinda fisherman.  And, in that vein, mono still seems to be (IMHO) the best, all-around compromise line.  As I said in another thread, I'm fishing 8lb test mono on a M/H spinning setup as my main rod (cranks, dropshot, weightless and weighted soft plastics) and haven't had a problem detecting strikes or setting the hook even when making long casts and getting 'immediate' hits.  Sure, the line stretches, but it's not a rubber band.

 

This year, I wanted to start jig fishing seriously.  So, I added a MH/F spinning reel spooled with 12lb Trilene-XL.  So far, I've pitched into nasty stuff and horsed a couple decent fish out.  I've also hooked the cover and been able to get my jig back without the line breaking.  It just seems like I can get most of the performance I could ever need out of mono.

 

Two things, though, in the interest of full disclosure:  First, I like the idea of having to work to land a fish.  In other words, fishing with 40lb braid and really heavy tackle doesn't appeal to me on the surface, anyway.  I'd rather have a little more sport in my fishing - not just in terms of location, but in terms of the fight.  

 

Second, I *am* going to experiment with braid again to see if I change my tune.  Right now, the barrier is that I'm having too much fun learning to fish out of my kayak to worry about another test.  And, with the weather in the northeast like it is so far, I would rather capitalize on just being on the water and fishing what I know.

 

 

Braid may likely be the 'right', or even 'best', choice.  But, FWIW, I think using mono is a more viable alternative than most of the static online suggests.   Good luck.  And be sure to post your experiences so we can all learn from them!

Why use 12lb to work and land a fish, not trying to be an arse but a PB of 5#s on 12lb line isn't much work to land a fish, unless you tie bad knots, I don't how you would loose the fish.  I will add if the fish gets you in wood 40lb braid might not help..  In my youth I used to think this way, however if I lost a 10lb fish because I was using 6lb line I would be very upset, now I have read many stories of large fish caught on light line, but I fish allot of rock and wood.  I mainly use 8# mono(Berkley XT) and 10# FC(Seagar Invisx) and braid(Suffix832, Seagar Kazen) and this has severed me well from the bank, but now that I am riding with boaters I see that I need higher test on some of my gear.  Its not the fish but the rocks and wood that I didnt have access to on the bank..

 

OP Keep in mind some braid floats and some braid sinks, mono floats and FC sinks and each has properties that give you an advantage to specific techniques and lures.  A single line choice is hard but I would use a floating braid with FC or Mono leader depending on what your throwing.  For me and my gear mono is my preferred choice for treble topwater style baits such as pop-rs, I like mono here because it floats and adds some delay to the hook set.  For frogs you need braid, I used to miss too many fish with frogging until I changed to braid a no issue now, braid has little to no stretch and you need that with frog fishing.  FC works well with allot of baits you mentioned but still has stretch, sinks and you cant buy cheap here or you will loose out, I personally like Seagar InvisX FC.  With the braid as the main line you can handle most techniques and when environmental factors dictate it add a leader.

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I've been a longstanding mono user and, despite experimenting with braid, I haven't seen a reason to change.

 

I'm basically a single-rod kinda fisherman.  And, in that vein, mono still seems to be (IMHO) the best, all-around compromise line.  As I said in another thread, I'm fishing 8lb test mono on a M/H spinning setup as my main rod (cranks, dropshot, weightless and weighted soft plastics) and haven't had a problem detecting strikes or setting the hook even when making long casts and getting 'immediate' hits.  Sure, the line stretches, but it's not a rubber band.

 

 

People should always do what suits them best.  As long as you realize that 20-30 lb braid is the same size as 8 lb mono, then you are fine.  I like braid better.  I use alot of 15 lb which is the sze of 4 lb mono and I like the results.

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Why use 12lb to work and land a fish, not trying to be an arse but a PB of 5#s on 12lb line isn't much work to land a fish, unless you tie bad knots, I don't how you would loose the fish.

I could do that, too... The main reason I up'ed the strength of the line was to try to make it easier to retrieve a jig when I hooked a branch (save $$).  I also thought the slightly thicker line might be a little better re: abrasion resistance.  Since I'm throwing right into snarls of downed trees and rocks, that seemed prudent.

 

But, you're right, there's potentially even more 'sport' in using the lighter line.

 

Mind you, I'm not trying to sound 'holier than thou' re: why I use mono in the strengths I use.  It's a hobby, and everyone should be able to enjoy that hobby how they like.  I just personally find it a little amusing when I fish with friends who are talking about the challenge of winching a 3lb fish out of weed when they're using 30lb test line.  There's a challenge there, for sure, but not fear of a fish breaking it off.  

 

Which leads to you second point... 

OP Keep in mind some braid floats and some braid sinks, mono floats and FC sinks and each has properties that give you an advantage to specific techniques and lures.  ...  With the braid as the main line you can handle most techniques and when environmental factors dictate it add a leader.

 

FWIW, I would agree with everything you said.  *shrugs*

 

People should always do what suits them best.  As long as you realize that 20-30 lb braid is the same size as 8 lb mono, then you are fine.  I like braid better.  I use alot of 15 lb which is the sze of 4 lb mono and I like the results.

The strength-to-diameter ratio for braid is one of the most attractive things about it... Again, I'm not panning braid.  I think it's a fine tool.  I'm just saying it hasn't been the Holy Grail of fishing for me (yet) as some people seem to make it sound.  And, I think that someone can be just as successful fishing with mono (or co-poly, or fluoro, or whatever) if you learn to manage the line well.

 

 

To sum it all up, and then I'll shut up:  Every line is a compromise.  It's fun to experiment and see what suits your situations. My personal opinion is that mono, though many think it's been surpassed, is still a fine choice.  See what you think for yourself. :)

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Yeah, all that crap is BS.  I have used braid for years on new and old rods and it does not damage guides.  i have fished braid and mono side by side and not noticed any problems with visibility.  In other words, often my boat partner uses mono or vice versa and there is no difference. 

 

Use whatever you want but Braid is awesome.  you can have all the strength you want in a much smaller line.

 

 

 

agree totally.would use suffix 832 in 50 lb test with no leaders.

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Thanks everyone. I will probably go with Power Pro or SpiderWire EZ Braid in 50# or 65#. I wasn't sure if the rod guide cutting was true since I read an article on Bass Resource that said it was. Ha. For backing, should I use tape or mono? 

 

 

if u get powerproget super slick.regular powerpro is outdated.stay away from spiderwire.sufix 832 is the roundest most tightly wound braid.i've used braid since the early 90's and have tried most of them.

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The strength-to-diameter ratio for braid is one of the most attractive things about it... Again, I'm not panning braid.  I think it's a fine tool.  I'm just saying it hasn't been the Holy Grail of fishing for me (yet) as some people seem to make it sound.  And, I think that someone can be just as successful fishing with mono (or co-poly, or fluoro, or whatever) if you learn to manage the line well.

 

 

For sure, it is no holy grail.  All it is, is more strength in light line.  Which is a pretty good deal, if you ask me.

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agree totally.would use suffix 832 in 50 lb test with no leaders.

 

I don't use leaders, unless you count C-rigs are leaders but then I use the same size line.

 

I have 50 lb braid on a rod I use with my a-rig because it cost 20 bucks and has lots of hooks.  And I want it back if I snag it :)

 

So far, not a single fish on the a-rig.

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I don't use leaders, unless you count C-rigs are leaders but then I use the same size line.

 

I have 50 lb braid on a rod I use with my a-rig because it cost 20 bucks and has lots of hooks.  And I want it back if I snag it :)

 

So far, not a single fish on the a-rig.

 

 

Put that rig on 8lb test and on the first cast you will have five 7lb'ers eat it. 

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Well, I guess if it happened to you then I can't argue with it. I have braid on several cheap rods and have never seen this happen.

Here you go. This is an eagle gt.

20130705_123328_zpsbf9b64c1.jpg

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I've been a longstanding mono user and, despite experimenting with braid, I haven't seen a reason to change.

 

I'm basically a single-rod kinda fisherman.  And, in that vein, mono still seems to be (IMHO) the best, all-around compromise line.  As I said in another thread, I'm fishing 8lb test mono on a M/H spinning setup as my main rod (cranks, dropshot, weightless and weighted soft plastics) and haven't had a problem detecting strikes or setting the hook even when making long casts and getting 'immediate' hits.  Sure, the line stretches, but it's not a rubber band.

 

This year, I wanted to start jig fishing seriously.  So, I added a MH/F spinning reel spooled with 12lb Trilene-XL.  So far, I've pitched into nasty stuff and horsed a couple decent fish out.  I've also hooked the cover and been able to get my jig back without the line breaking.  It just seems like I can get most of the performance I could ever need out of mono.

 

Two things, though, in the interest of full disclosure:  First, I like the idea of having to work to land a fish.  In other words, fishing with 40lb braid and really heavy tackle doesn't appeal to me on the surface, anyway.  I'd rather have a little more sport in my fishing - not just in terms of location, but in terms of the fight.  

 

Second, I *am* going to experiment with braid again to see if I change my tune.  Right now, the barrier is that I'm having too much fun learning to fish out of my kayak to worry about another test.  And, with the weather in the northeast like it is so far, I would rather capitalize on just being on the water and fishing what I know.

 

 

Braid may likely be the 'right', or even 'best', choice.  But, FWIW, I think using mono is a more viable alternative than most of the static online suggests.   Good luck.  And be sure to post your experiences so we can all learn from them!

 

I agree with most of what you said. Only reason couple of reasons I can think that I would go to braid would be better strength to diameter so a smaller reel size can be maintained and that it casts farther(except in wind) which I have yet to see in my limited experiments.

 

I would never use anything other than mono for topwater and jerkbaits though.

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I have a Abu Garcia Revo STX spooled with Suffix832 #20 Braid with Seagar #10- #20 FC leader on a Abu Garcia 7'0 Vengeance.  To say I love it is the understatment of year for me.  The key is learning how to tie the knots used to connect your braid & your leader.  Once you have that down and adjust your baitcaster every time you change lure weights, backlashes are almost eliminated. Also check this article out

 

http://www.bassresource.com/fishing/supertune-baitcaster.html?fb_action_ids=4859679086844&fb_action_types=og.likes&fb_source=aggregation&fb_aggregation_id=288381481237582

 

It has helped me out alot !

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Do I use tape or mono as backing? I heard electrical tape works but it seems too slippery.

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