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PondBoss

Jig fishing equipment?

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So I'm new to fishing a jig, but after that last time I went out I will always fish one.  My question is what is an ideal equipment set up for fishing jigs.  As of right now I'm using a baitcasting reel and 6'6 med/heavy rod.  Pitching 1/4-1/2 oz strike king pro model jigs with matching zoom chunk trailers.  Any help on set up would be appreciated, as I am asking Santa for a "jig" set up.  Thanks in advance

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I prefer a 7 to 7ft3 MH rod for jig fishing. I also have a Powell 804 which is a 8ft MH for fishing one tons much deeper. I prefer a bit longer rod, but 6'6 is fine also.

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I use 3 different rods for jig fishing. It really depends on what I'm doing. All rods have chronarchs.

BCR853glx used for more finesse and clear water 10-12lb line

BCR854glx general purpose 15lb line

BCR855 glx heavy duty fishing 30lb braid

All of those are 7'1" Once I went to 7' rods I feel my jig fishing excelled over a 6'6". Better hook ups, better casts, and longer casts.

For really small jigs I have a 7'7" smb loomis.  It works great for real clear water or finicky fish.

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I have just started venture beyond 6-6 a little bit - at first it just seemed awkward, but after sticking it out, now it works well for me.  One thing that I do for all of my jig fishing is use braided line - I like 20# to 30# Power Pro - it helps me with the hooksets and is easier for me to control on the filips/pitches - and you won't have trouble horsin' 'em out of the brush piles.

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This should be your best rod. I recommend 7' MHF or HF.

Although I HATE braided line, it will significantly improve

your jig fishing. These are my rigs:

G. Loomis GLX MBR 844C/ CTE100GT

G. Loomis GLX BCR 854/ Curado CU200E7

8-)

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Shimano Crucial CRCX610MH - 1/4-1/2 oz General Purpose Jig Rod

Shimano Crucial CRCX76MH - 3/8-1 oz Larger jigs and flipping

Shimano Crucial CRSDX72M - 1/8-1/4 oz Finesse Jigs

The 6'10" rod has either 14lb fluorocarbon or 30lb braid and a 12-14 lb fluoro leader. The 7'6" rod has 40lb braid and a 14-20lb fluoro leader. If I'm flipping directly into heavy vegetation I'll take off the leader. The last rod has 20lb braid with anywhere from an 8-12lb fluoro leader.

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I usually fish jigs under 1/2oz, under 3/8oz actually.  Most of the time I use 1/4-5/16oz and use a 6'6"MH Pinnacle Perfecta that I won during their giveaway.  I usually use 7' rods but the Pinnacle is very well suited for smaller jigs.

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For finesse jigs, I like to use a 7 ft H rod for that extra power. It's a little different from what others use, but it gives me confidence that I will not lose a fish. For Bigger/deeper jigs I like to use a 7'6 H.

As far as a reel, ALWAYS use a higher gear ratio. This allows you to reel in slack line more quickly to get that hook set. The I use more the most part is 14 lb braid with a 12 floucrabon leader.

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A little better explanation on a jig rod, in my opinion. It seems pretty common on this forum that a MH is the rod of choice. I think you'll find that to be true all over the country, including elite pros. Assuming we are talking about jig fishing and not flipping. Im a ji a holic, and Ive played with em all. One thing I can say for me, is I am dead set on the MH rod. Where I will vary is in rod length. Here in California I fish a jig from the bank, to 60ft deep. I select my rod based on the depth Ill be fishing, not the weight of the jig(unless its lighter then 3/8, then I consider it finesse). I will use the same rod for 3/8 up to 1oz jigs. If Im fishing shallower then say 25ft a 7ft or 7'3 rod is perfect for me. If Im gonna work that jig deeper, then I will want more rod to move more line on a hook set and Im all over the 8ft rod.

  The action is plenty to wrestle 12+ lb bass out of brush and grass. All but the slop, and even then I use a MH flippin stik. You dont need a broom stick, matter or fact I avoid them.A rod too stiff will not  allow the fish to enhale the bait on tight line.Its most important to be able to count the pebbles as the jig moves across them. You want to be able to feel any change in the bait. If the rod is to stiff you will miss bites because they can let go faster then they eat it.

   Lastly, you do not need braid, you will get more bites with out it. If you have to use it go for it. But Ive taught many anti jig guys to fish a jig, and they become believers real quick once they get the feel. It doesnt take long, but it helps to catch em while your learning. I rarely fish anything other then 15lb fluorocarbon on my jigs now through pre-spawn. Ill go up to 25lb then, that has more to do with where I fish then anything.

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Braid can be used without a leader. I find the thin line to be

pretty stealthy in most water, but may require a fluorocarbon

leader in gin clear lakes.  Although I don't like fishing with braid,

I think it really helps with certain presentations.

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Either rod is more than sufficient for handling double digit bass :)

Shimano Crucial CRCX610MH Extra Fast or Falcon Cara T7 CC-6-1610H Cara Grass Rod

I use Berkeley Big Game Mean Green in 15# test unless I'm fishing matted vegetation or buck brush, then & only then will I switch to braid with a longer heavier rod.

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Thanks for all the feed back, although I have to say that I'm rather confused by all of the classifications of rods.  I guess I'm just not in the loop.  The general consensus though seems to be to go with a bit longer rod.  It totally makes sense as far as moving more line and helping keep a taught line through out the hook set.  I do use braid as a backing on all my reels.  The ponds I fish are pretty clear so a mono or flouro leader is a must.  Ususally between 12-14.  Now that I've got your opinions on rods, what about reels and gear ratios?  Thanks again

Matt

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I use a Pro Qualifier in a 7.1:1 gear ratio.

I like the higher ratio so I can reel slack in faster before setting the hook. It also helps if you make a bad cast and you want the jig to the boat/shore faster.

I'm sure that any reel with a 6:1 or above would work just fine.

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For most of my jig fishing I use a 6.4:1 PQ.  On my flipping rod I use a 7.1:1 PQ.  Either ratio will work just fine.

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Thanks for all the feed back, although I have to say that I'm rather confused by all of the classifications of rods. I guess I'm just not in the loop. The general consensus though seems to be to go with a bit longer rod. It totally makes sense as far as moving more line and helping keep a taught line through out the hook set. I do use braid as a backing on all my reels. The ponds I fish are pretty clear so a mono or flouro leader is a must. Ususally between 12-14. Now that I've got your opinions on rods, what about reels and gear ratios? Thanks again

Matt

Rod length and high speed reel are most important because you often need to take up line quick Fish often take a jig and move to deeper water. If your in a boat that usually means they are coming at you. 

I know Im a minority about the braid on a jig, but thats just life. 8-) Here in Nor Cal very few throw jigs on braid. Braid and rocks dont mix well. I can count rocks with regular mono so I dont see a need.

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A lot of good information here. Personally, I would go with a 7'3"+ heavy power fast action rod and a high speed reel, 6:1 will work but I prefer 7:1 for all the reasons already mentioned. My jig rod is a 7'4" heavy power fast action rod with a 7.3:1 reel, and I think I will actually be upgrading to a 7'8" rod for next season. Braid will certainly increase sensitivity and help detect strikes when jig fishing. I have used braid for all bottom contact baits to this point. However, this spring I will be trying some fluoro to see how I like it, and to see if my strike rate increases at all. Good luck in your search for a solid jig combo. My biggest piece of advice is get the best that you (or someone else) can afford - you won't regret it.

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I just purchased my first dedicated jig rod. A 7'3" H Fast action Dobyns Savvy 735. It will also serve for flippin'/pitchin', small swimbaits, swimjigs, and frogs. I think you'll be better off in the long run with a rod slightly longer than 7'. Some might prefer a 7'6" or longer rod for the jig fishing. However, I'm...a...height challenged, so I wanted a rod longer than 7', but shorter than 7'6". The 735 was - for me - the right size.  I'll probably be going with a 6.X:1 reel loaded with 50-60lb braid.

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As I posted earlier, you want a 7.1:1 gear ratio, because it helps pick up the slack line quicker when you get a strike

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i match rod power and line strength to the jig weight and cover being fished.

i use:

bsr852 glx/2500 stradic - 3/16-5/16oz jigs w/3" plastic trailers

bcr803 glx/chronarch 51mg - 5/16-3/8oz jigs

mbr844c glx/curado 201 - >5/16oz jigs

like previously mentioned, i also like a high gear ratio for all bottom baits.

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If I'm in open water swimming a jig I will use a 6'6 mh rod and a fast reel for quick line pick up. If I am weeds I will switch to a heavy rod. I don't like to use braid on BC reels, but in lily pads it is a must.

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#1 recommendation listed above for Jig fishing equipment is a 7 ½' or longer rod for removing slack.

#2 recommendation listed above for Jig fishing equipment is a high speed reel for removing slack.

Just a personal observation, I think y'all got way to much slack in your line!

Feeling a jig bite requires keeping a certain amount of tension on your line while at the same time keeping a certain amount of slackness in your line. To the average angler this makes no sense at all but the experienced jig angler it makes total sense.

Maintain contact with your lure at all times, allow the lure to free-fall unrestricted, but without letting slack form in the line; follow your lures down with your rod tip.

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There's a lot of great information here and a lot of nice setups have been offered.  Keep in mind that everyone has offered ideal setups and what you need also depends on what you are willing to spend on a rod and reel. 

To summarize what has been provided in the thread so far:

  • Purchase at least a mid-range MH rod if you can afford one.  For best results in moving line, go with a 7 feet or longer rod.

  • Purchase a reel with a high enough ratio to take up line swiftly.  A ratio of 6:1 to 7:1 should be considered.

  • Use braid, fluorocarbon, or braid with a fluorocarbon leader for your line depending upon the clarity of the lakes you fish.

  • Rods with heavy action are useful when flipping very heavy cover. 

I also want to repeat Catt's quote.  I don't know how many times I've seen him post this but it is an excellent quote. 

Feeling a jig bite requires keeping a certain amount of tension on your line while at the same time keeping a certain amount of slackness in your line. To the average angler this makes no sense at all but the experienced jig angler it makes total sense.

Maintain contact with your lure at all times, allow the lure to free-fall unrestricted, but without letting slack form in the line; follow your lures down with your rod tip.

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When  I was learning to jig fish, eons ago, I found myself moving the jig too much and too far when the bite was slow(almost non existent).  I went to a 5'6' MH rod and it made catch ratio much higher than with a long rod.   Now that I have learned to slow down and creep the jig on those kind of days I use a 7'6" MH.

Kelley

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A Jig-N-Craw is the simplest lures & yet most over complicated by anglers.  :)

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