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Okay, I'm sure I'm gonna get lots of different opinions about this topic.  I've been fishing braid for the last 8yrs.  It started out with fishing just saltwater off of the S.Cal coast and then just progressed to all my rods which now have some form of braid although most are fished with topshots of either mono or flouro.  Now over the years I have used everything from 10lb to 100lb braid and on all my bass rods with the exceptions of my 2 swimbait rods, one which has 40lb braid and 25 mono and the other has 65lb braid with 25 flouro I can't see a reason to fish anything more then 30lb.  Mainly fish 20 with the exception of my flipping/punching set ups, 1 hvy which doubles as a frog/pitching rod, and my umbrella rig which all have 30lb.  I can not see any reason for 50 or 65lb braid to fish bass with.  Sorry, I've played tug a war with 50+ pound amberjacks, horsed in 25+ pound jack crevelles, and winched a few 30-50lb groupers off the bottom and away from oil platforms in the Gulf of Mexico.  If I can do that with 65lb braid to those fish there is no reason other then overkill to fish bass with it.  So my question to those who do is why? The picture attached is of a 100+ pound amber jack that I managed on 80lb. So again why other then you can.  

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IMHO, 40 or 50 lb braid handles better than any other that I have tried.

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I use 50lb when the cover gets thick. Not so much for the fish but for what I may have to pull him out of.

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IMHO, 40 or 50 lb braid handles better than any other that I have tried.

X2 smaller braid tends to dig into the spool and cause issues.

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I use 50 lb braid. I fish super heavy cover. If I hook a huge bass and it gets wrapped on a log, I want to pull the log in too.

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For me, braid use is less about the lines breaking strength and more about no stretch & manageability.

 

The line strength ends up being a beneficial by-product.  10 & 20 works for me on spinning gear and 30 seems to be my favorite for casting gear.  I have 50 on my frog rod as the extra strength and weed cutting properties come in very handy.

 

I do use mono quite a bit for treble hook baits.  If someone came out with a mono that could match braids long distance hook up abilities, I'd use it.

 

A-Jay

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I have always heard anything smaller than 30lb braid digs in on baitcasters, and since braid is usually 15$/spool minimum, I don't plan on trying it out. At this point I'm sticking with fluoro and mono because I don't fish much heavy cover. Although if I could go as light as 15 or 20 on a baitcaster, I might try it and use fluoro leaders

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The guys that fish heavy abrasive cover like the big O like heavy braid 50-65 lb for the nasty stuff. I totally understand your thought process as 30 lb braid breaks at 40-50 lbs. But nasty cover requires heavier braid to stand up to the nasty thorn bushes & other nasty cover.

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okay, let me be the first to say, I started fishing 15lb braid on baitcasters, just moved up to 20 because of my topshots.  I have never had braid dig in.  Used 10lb by accident(thought I picked up a heavier spool) and it didn't dig in just was too light.  As long as it's put on tight, has some sort of backing to grip(I would suggest some mono) then it won't dig in.  It will become a mess if one of your friends that's not used to fishing braid tries and backlashes if they don't understand how to pick it out and go to cutting.  But never had a problem with lighter braid digging in.

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I agree with you, I don't see the need for heavy braid - the heaviest I have on a reel is (I believe) 30lb test, but I don't use that for much of anything.

 

My spinning gear is fitted with 10 lb test PowerPro, and my casting gear is 20 lb test PowerPro. I've winched some pretty nice fish with these setups. I use a leader on all of them, anywhere from 6-15lb test.

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For me, braid use is less about the lines breaking strength and more about no stretch & manageability.

The line strength ends up being a beneficial by-product. 10 & 20 works for me on spinning gear and 30 seems to be my favorite for casting gear. I have 50 on my frog rod as the extra strength and weed cutting properties come in very handy.

I do use mono quite a bit for treble hook baits. If someone came out with a mono that could match braids long distance hook up abilities, I'd use it.

A-Jay

Exactly. I agree with everything! I even use the same line sizes

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I rarely use heavier than 15lb braid on spinning, and most of my casting reels have 10-17lb mono on them, but I find for baitcasting reels, I like a line with a diameter of at least 8lb test since I have been throwing 10-20 lb my entire life, and if I try a thin braid I just seem to have some issues I never have with a #40-65 and I find that I need less line with a 65-12 or 50-10, can get away with 50-75 yards with backing, casting distance is the same, never digs or have over runs, so I just stick with it. Plus, here in Florida I often need 2 ounces to punch through mats and I can flip with more confidence and accuracy with a line in the diameter near 10lb test.

 

and I have caught 50lb plus tarpon on 25 lb test mono, 20lb braid, but in saltwater I prefer Spinning gear since it is usually more windy, and I agree that #50 is overkill, but it makes more sense for me since I am only flipping 20-30 feet  and distance on flipping or even frogging gear is not important as I can chuck a frog a mile on 50 braid, and the confidence of being able to handle the worst stuff just makes me feel good.

 

I also think it depends on the type of braid and how you have your drag set, but many times I can't afford to let a big bass in the 10b range to take more than a few inches of line or I am not getting him out of the mats. When Possible, I try to flip with 15lb hybrid, or 20lb big game as I feel I get more strikes with a mono or copoly then with braid even in dirty water. I guess to sum up my point....I can use a heavier braid better and flip more precisely, so I don't see the need to change. Maybe braids are better this year than last, I don't know and have not tried the best stuff in lighter tests yet.

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20-30# braid will handle any bass on this planet with ease.....the problem, it will not handle heavy rods and big hook sets. Itll pop like a zit either at the knot or in the main line. Ive done it with 50# but never on 65# at least not yet.

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All I can tell y'all is come on down to Texas & y'all will change your mind!

I grew up working on a Charter Boat in the Gulf of Mexico & once move a fish away from the rig it's clear sailing.

Now hook an 8# plus in standing timber, buck brush, or mesquite; ya move em off one hangup & his got 50 more to wrap.

Ya every play with Pick Up Sticks?

That's what the bottom of Toledo looks like!

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I broke 30 lb PP twice today getting 2 pounders out of the slop.  I normally punch with 65 lb but I broke that rod yesterday.

 

 Pitch a 1 oz tungsten into some florida maidencane mixed with coontail and hydrilla with a few dollar pads just for fun and see how far you get with 20 lb anything.

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I use 80lb braid on my flipping and froggin rod.  I've snapped 65lb just from a backlash so I like the extra strength and performance wise is pretty dang close.  Lose a little casting distance.

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I only use braid when it is absolutely necessary, and when I do it is typically 50-65 lb for casting and 10-15 for spinning... I typically only see braid dig in when it is on a set up that i pitch with, a cast and retrieve type set up typically doesn't dig in, at least not in my experience...

 

Mitch

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You come to my everyday lake and pretty soon you will find out why you need 50 - 60 lb braid. Her first name is Prosopis and last name glandulosa. Catt knows her very well too.

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Okay, for those who gave me an honest answer without trying to call me out thank you.  I've seen the pattern in the responses that heavier is easier for most to handle, gives them the assurance that they have the gear in case they need it, and some believe the smaller line sizes will cause problems.  Great reasons and I thank you.  For those who wish to try and tell me to try using 20lb or how they have broke 30lb punching.  I do punch and frog fish with 30lb, use smaller frogs with 20lb, and pulled fish out of trees and bushes as well as a few yellowtail, white seabass, and countless calico's out of S. Cal coastal kelp beds, so been there done that. And I haven't broke any of my rods from user error or overloading my equipment.  My swimbait rods that I fish heavy on, well they are designed for musky fishing.  If I'm gonna throw a 4-6oz bait, I'm gonna fish the tackle to handle it but again even though it's 40 and 65lb braid, I fish 25lb mono and flouro. Your equipment is only as good as its weakest part....rod, reel, line, hook, and knot. The weakest point will fail whatever it is.  I do  believe using the lighter braid does make me have to check for frays, weak and worn points in my line, and my knots more often then if it were 50-65lb. But that's a choice I have to be willing to make to continue to be successful.  So thank you all for answering and giving me your reasons on why fish so heavy.

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I totally agree with Gulfcaptain.   I'm not a b/c user but if I were and lighter braid did dig in that would be all the more reason for me to be a spinning user.  I do fish Florida, I don't use anything heavy than 15# on a medium spinning rod, lines don't break and lures don't go flying.  One of the nice things about braid is that you don't have to over do a hook set.

In fairness saltwater fishing is different, we don't lock down a drag and tail drag a 5# fish in.  We use our drags, the key is not the strength of the line or rod but how much line we have.  It's all about technique here, even at my age (68) I'm still handling these fish with spinning tackle lighter lines.  I don't top shot (braid as backing with 50-100 yd mono shock) as I'm using offshore spinning tackle, 6000-8000 reels with 30# braid no backing.  Catch many aj.s sails, kingfish on that kind of a set up.  One of my more recent catches, the one in my avatar was caught inshore on one of my heavier set ups, 7'6 mh rod 4000 reel and 20# braid.  Some of the younger guys next to me were using med spinning with smaller reels.  You will not find too many fish that will fight harder than a jack crevalle.  

In the intracoastal where this fish was caught it't like fishing a river.  There is current, vegetation, cement pylons, docks, crab pots, rocks and all kinds of things for fish to get wrapped around.

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I'm another one that just likes how 50-65lb braid handles. Not so much for the strength, it just casts and fishes better on baitcasters for me is all. My spinning rods I use braid on have 20lb and I've never had the braid break when it shouldn't have. 

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Vernon.jpg

20# test would be your first choice? ;)

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Oh yea I forgot the standing timber over those boys shoulder is usually 2-3' under water & where I fish this point. Notice the white pole with a green top? That's a buoy marking the boat lane! Ya know the place where we run our boats @ 70 mph+

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Mark another one up for manageability. I've used all the way down to 20# and I just simply like the 50-65lb braid's handling better. I get better distance and far fewer backlashes. I did notice when I used the 20lb on my casting reel it dug in pretty bad, especially with significantly coated braids.

 

I guess for me it also comes down to confidence. I've got more confidence in a heavier line, therefore I'll be more likely to pitch it to a spot where I'm more confident I can pull it (hung lure or fish) in out without running a risk of breaking the line. I know, I know.....the true breaking strength is higher so I could theoretically downsize.....but I think it's just a mentality thing for me.

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For me, braid use is less about the lines breaking strength and more about no stretch & manageability.

 

The line strength ends up being a beneficial by-product.  10 & 20 works for me on spinning gear and 30 seems to be my favorite for casting gear.  I have 50 on my frog rod as the extra strength and weed cutting properties come in very handy.

 

Pretty much the same way of thinking here.

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