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Alright, so whats the big deal about the different types of cork grips. There are AAA, AA, A etc. types. What exactly is the justification in spending more money on higher level cork?

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No real justification other than aesthetics. Nicer looking cork just costs more $$$.

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The cheaper the cork, the more pits it has.  Pits require wood filler which eventually falls out.

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What exactly is the justification in spending more money on higher level cork?

To get better cork.

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Alright, so whats the big deal about the different types of cork grips. There are AAA, AA, A etc. types. What exactly is the justification in spending more money on higher level cork?

 

 

To me, It is sort of like leather.  Higher quality last longer (supposedly) and feels better.  Also, as others have stated, it pits less.  Maybe DVC can chime in and give a good (more scientific) explanation?

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More pits = better grip. My rods, 7' MH, Berkley, cherry wood, cork handle, cost me $23 at Walmart. I have three. Biggest bass I have pulled in on my rod is 10.15. Can a $100 rod do better? Sometimes we tend to "overkill" :)

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More pits = better grip. My rods, 7' MH, Berkley, cherry wood, cork handle, cost me $23 at Walmart. I have three. Biggest bass I have pulled in on my rod is 10.15. Can a $100 rod do better? Sometimes we tend to "overkill" :)

I could have married an ugly woman, but I much prefer my pretty one. :laugh5: Brian.

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It's a get what you pay for situation. Only you can decide if it's worth the money.

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The leather analogy doesn't quite work. Cork is tree bark and has varying natural imperfections (pits). It's not processed like leather. Right now good cork retails for about $5/in. which equates to $50 plus labor on a 10" handle goes to $3.50-$1.20/in. as the grade changes. There is no industry standard for grading cork either so it's all arbitrary to top it all off. I'm liking alternative materials like burl cork, EVA and carbon skinned foam more and more. 

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The leather analogy doesn't quite work. Cork is tree bark and has varying natural imperfections (pits). It's not processed like leather. Right now good cork retails for about $5/in. which equates to $50 plus labor on a 10" handle goes to $3.50-$1.20/in. as the grade changes. There is no industry standard for grading cork either so it's all arbitrary to top it all off. I'm liking alternative materials like burl cork, EVA and carbon skinned foam more and more. 

Burl cork?

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Filler eventually falls out, even its sealed. Lesser cork has more filler.

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Burl cork?

A couple varieties and colors of burl cork.20141019_142516_zpsgzvqlwqk.jpg

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A couple varieties and colors of burl cork.20141019_142516_zpsgzvqlwqk.jpg

Awesome handle. What is the difference between regular cork and burl cork?

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What is the difference between regular cork and burl cork?

Burl cork is composed of ground up natural cork and a bonding agent. Some are dyed different colors. Typically, burls are heavier than natural cork, but some of the new models are getting much lighter.

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Beat me to it. There are also products known as varigated, burnt, composite and rubberized cork but they're all along the same lines. 

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I use burl and burnt cork along with top grade cork on all my builds.  The burl keeps the costs down a bit and the added weight on the handle never hurts when it comes to balance.   I'm a big fan of burl and the like.

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I've got rods about 8 years old with the cork looking pretty darn good.  Other rods in the same price range have not fared quite as well, the look is pasable but have become just a little slick.

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Pick up a Dobyns Savy and a Champion and look at the cork side by side. You'll see a huge difference in the grades of cork. 

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