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FryDog62

The Truth About Braid - Sink Or Float?

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I have always been someone that believes all braided line floats, at least the brands I've used.  

 

Recently I've read some posts and also some online reviews that contradict each other.  For instance, the Cabelas site has Q/A about each product.  For Sufix 832, a "Cabelas Expert" says the line sinks, but then the "Best Answer" they select from a "Top 100 Contributor" says it floats.  

 

Several other sites I have seen one person say absolutely - "yes" it sinks and others say for sure "no" it floats...   

 

Okay, so what's the real answer?  

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I tested it out in my sink the other day. When you just drop it in the water 832 floats. When you push it down in the water, it doesn't really sink but suspends. Spiderwire floats no matter what you do to it. Fluoro sinks like a rock once you push it into the water. Would I call 832 a sinking braid? Not really. It does take on water and sink slowly compared to other braids I've tried. Nothing like fluoro though.

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Suffix 832 has one strand of Goretex fiber in it.  I use it in 10 lb size on a spinning reel and would say it's more or less neutrally buoyant.  There is another brand of braid, I forget which, which as more Goretex in it and actually sinks, according to advertising.  There's also Tuff LIne Hevicore braided line which has a center strand of PTFE and is 40% heavier than standard braided line.

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The best way to explain it is: it is just there.  It doesn't really "float", it doesn't really "sink". 

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the other thing people are neglecting here is that just because braid "floats" it doesn't mean it will pull your baits to the top.  It may float but it is not providing flotation.  

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I throw a Yozuri top water a lot that looks similar to the Pop-R but works much better. Floro lines will not work with it, or should I say, it will not work with floro's unless you are steadily ripping the fool out of it. I have tried different 10# braids and there are some that stay on the surface, and some that submerge. If they submerge, it kills a lot of the action on the lure so I stick with the ones that stay on the surface.

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Fluoro is a poor choice for small topwater baits like this for the exact reason you see. Braid works but can foul in the trebels. Try braid and a short leader of mono for the best of both worlds. 

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I wouldn't say braid "floats" in the sense it will rise to the surface and stay there. However it is more bouyant than fluoro or copolymer lines, meaning it is more resistant to sinking (e.g. slower sink rate).  There are benefits and downfalls to this.  But just like any other tool in your tacklebox, the more you understand the characteristics of it, the better prepared you'll be to achieve your desired results.

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I tested it out in my sink the other day. When you just drop it in the water 832 floats. When you push it down in the water, it doesn't really sink but suspends. Spiderwire floats no matter what you do to it. Fluoro sinks like a rock once you push it into the water. Would I call 832 a sinking braid? Not really. It does take on water and sink slowly compared to other braids I've tried. Nothing like fluoro though.

 

^^ This ^^

 

All lines including fluorocarbon will float due to the surface tension of water if you simply place a piece in water. Once that surface tension is broke though is where you see the differences. 832 stays under (water) if pushed there, though some tests have shown it to actually sink slowly. Might depend upon pound test tested Other braids like PowerPro will keep popping back to the surface no matter how many times you push it under water. Mono is close to neautrally buoyant but will fall slowly, whereas fluoro definitely sinks, and at a faster rate than mono.

 

-T9

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Does braid absorb water?  I'm wondering if so then wouldn't it sink after a few casts?

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Just like you don't want to use fluoro on a topwater, I don't want to use a floating braid on a weightless plastic (e.g. Senko) that I'm deadsticking.  The floating section of braid creates a bow in the line which kills any sensitivity you might otherwise have.  There's also less sensitivity with braid versus fluoro or copoly if a fish picks up a bait and swims toward you. Braid may be OK with a Texas rig with a significant size bullet weight attached but for me, it can still be a negative if I'm using a weight less than 1/4 oz.  So I prefer 100% fluoro for plastics whenever I can get away with it.  My home lake is very clear so unweighted and very lightly weighted plastics, and long casts, get more bites.  It's all a trade-off and you have to select the right line for the water clarity and cover situation.  Fortunately, we have choices.

 

ps - the "other sinking braid" is Spider Wire Fluoro Braid

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Hevi-Cast stays down. It works well for me too, reminds me of broken in Power Pro.

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Hevi-Cast stays down. It works well for me too, reminds me of broken in Power Pro.

 

 

Isn't Hevi-Core a "Lead Core" line used primarily by walleye fisherman to troll crank baits at deeper depths?  Or is Hevi-Core something different that bass fishermen can cast a variety of lures with a sink rate more similar to fluorocarbon?  

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Does braid absorb water?  I'm wondering if so then wouldn't it sink after a few casts?

 

No - most all braids are made from Spectra or Dyneema fibers which have practically zero water absorbance properties. The only water you might get is what gets carried on/in the spaces of the braiding itself, though that would be minimal as water tends not to cling to these fibers (which is why they usually feel so slick to the touch).

 

-T9

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Isn't Hevi-Core a "Lead Core" line used primarily by walleye fisherman to troll crank baits at deeper depths?  Or is Hevi-Core something different that bass fishermen can cast a variety of lures with a sink rate more similar to fluorocarbon?

No, it's PE braid.

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No, it's PE braid.

 Okay, being in Minnesota where walleye is pretty much the only thing people fish for - I think I have walked by Hevi-Core on the shelves a number of times thinking it was Tuf Lines version of lead core.  my mistake...   So, the question is - how effective is Hevi-Core for throwing plastics, football jigs, cranks, etc?   A braid with a sink rate similar to fluorocarbon I think could be a game changer..

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I wouldn't say it's the same as fluoro, but it works fine for plastics in weeds. I have 40# spooled on a Zillion and LTB mh/f rod.

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I wouldn't say it's the same as fluoro, but it works fine for plastics in weeds. I have 40# spooled on a Zillion and LTB mh/f rod.

 

 

I'm of the opinion that the only real advantage of fluorocarbon is its sink rate.  Other types of lines are more manageable, have less stretch, etc.  So... if there is a braid that sinks somewhat similar to fluorocarbon it negates fluorocarbon one step further IMO.  If visibility is not an issue then use Hevi-Core as a main line, if it is a factor then tie on a leader.  

 

The only other line I think I would use then is mono for topwater...  

 

Am I on target with my logic here?

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I'm of the opinion that the only real advantage of fluorocarbon is its sink rate.  Other types of lines are more manageable, have less stretch, etc.  So... if there is a braid that sinks somewhat similar to fluorocarbon it negates fluorocarbon one step further IMO.

 

Am I on target with my logic here?

 

Are you speaking in general terms or compared strictly against Hevi-Core? Fluorocarbon has several advantages depending upon what you are specifically comparing it to including density (affects sensitivity and sink rate - both better) and lack of water absorption (affects abrasion resistance and stretch - both better) as being the primary factors, IMO...

 

-T9

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"...Fluorocarbon ... With its lack of water absorption (affects abrasion resistance and stretch - both better)"

I think you could marinate Fluorocarbon and any Braided line for a year in Lake Superior and the fluoro would stretch like a rubber band compared to the braid."

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So I sense tangent airlines is preparing for takeoff here.  This isn't a braid vs. fluoro discussion.  Let's keep it on topic please.

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Perhaps.... but

I think the OP was trying to drive at the sink or float characteristic of braid.... and if a unique product such as Hevicore has a somewhat similar sink rate as fluorocarbon - then the deduction in logic is that it is also more manageable, less stretch, stronger, etc - and ultimately a superior product than fluorocarbon in most applications. The only exception being when visibility matters, then you would need to add a leader. Or when fishing topwater, use mono...which floats.

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Braid weighs a smidgeon less than water, while fluorocarbon weighs a smidgeon more than water.

 

A few years back I ran my own buoyancy test using a short trace of braid versus a trace of fluorocarbon.

The braid trace floated uncomfortably, often with one or both ends under the water.

The fluoro trace would hesitate on the surface (apparently due to surface tension) then sink slowly.

If one teensy sand granule was clinging to the braid trace, it would sink slowly like fluorocarbon.

If one teensy air-bubble was clinging to the fluoro, it would remain on the surface like braid.

 

Roger

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