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I am asking you experts, baitcasting 101 help????

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I want to learn to use a bait caster, I picked one up and want to learn the right way, I figure you folks are the best source for information.

There are so many videos out there its hard to know what is good advice and what will just make learning harder.

The tough part about learning is not finding someone who is good at doing it but someone who is good at teaching it.

I could blow through a lot of line learning this.

 

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Get a decent reel, turn the brake way up, slowly decrease it as you get better. You'll also learn how to apply less and less pressure to the spool with your thumb while casting and before long you'll be bombing em

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You have to learn timing . If you release the lure the same as with a spinning or spincasting reel you will cast it almost straight down and get a bad backlash . It has to be  released earlier , more like a lob . Try casting at the sky  , use plenty of brakes until you get the hang of it .

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It's good that you want to learn "right away" - a positive attitude can be helpful, but I'd recommend that you keep reasonable expectations.  Otherwise you may become a victim of your own enthusiasm.   

Learning to cast & fish with a revolving spool reel takes some time & it's different for everyone.   I've watched Glenn's videos on YouTube as well as the good ones here on BR  http://www.bassresource.com/bass-fishing-videos/rods-reels-videos, they all offer solid info that if followed will help you learn. 

Best advise I can offer is to perfect how to cast smoothly, don't get concerned so much about distance.  That will come as you become proficient.

 Use 15 mono - something inexpensive and enjoy the process.

A-Jay

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We have a sticky on casting with a baitcast reel.  I assume you have already read it and watched the video.  There are plenty of threads on using a baitcast reel.  What reel did you get?  What rod will you be using it on?

The problem with learning to use a baitcast reel is that one is never enough.  Next thing you know you will have a boatload of them.  Someone has to keep the Bait Monkey happy.  Might as well be you.  It will take a load off my back.   :D

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Here's how to adjust your reel, and cast it:

 

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One important thing not mentioned here yet is this. You never mentioned what you picked up, meaning rod and reel and I do not care what brand. Take a look at your rod. What weight lure range does it say, perhaps 1/4 to 3/4 or 1/8 to 5/8. When you first start learning to cast try using a lead weight that falls into the middle of the rods weight range.  So if it is a 1/4 to 3/4 I would choose a 1/2 ounce weight. If it is a 1/8 to 5/8 I would choose a 3/8 ounce lead weight. An experienced caster could throw a 1/8 ounce weight but it will frustrate you as you are just learning.  The other thing is lead weights are cheap. So if you snap one off it costs very little. Go to your local tackle shop and pick up a half dozen or so. If they are bullet style you can always use them with some plastic worms later, so no money is wasted. Just thread the weight on and tie a nice knot so it stays there. It takes a bit of learning but it is well worth it in the long run. Good Luck

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patience is the key.don't rush your cast,be smooth.

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Glenn's video is a good start and covered the basics.

The centrifical brake knob is also called the spool tension adjustment knob and important to adjust it as Glenn demonstrated.

I like to start beginners learning to cast a bait casting reel with a moderate action crank bait rod and 1/2 oz casting plug.  The slower action rod is more forgiving with the release point and starts the spool spinning slower than a fast action rod.

Also learn how to remove a backlash because they will happen, see the videos. 

Taping the spool line with about 50 yards of line works good, especially with braided line.

Buy a 1/4 lb spool of Berkely Big Game 12# mono and don't worry about loosing line when learning.

Good luck and welcome to bass fishing.

Tom

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Wrb stated how I started, it's easier to start of throwing something a little heavier on like a medium to medium heavy Rod. I learn how to with 1/2oz jigs, start with your reel tight and easily back it off and practice feeling the line peel with your thumb. 

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one thing that I find helps is to fully wait until the rod is loaded on your backcast before swinging forward, much like casting a fly rod.

that way you have the full transfer of power from the rod to the lure and it allows the lure to move fast without going too fast.

remember that backlashes occur because the spool is revolving forward faster than the line is coming off of it.

so you want to have a smooth fluid motion with the rods full power behind it.

with "lob" casts it can be easier to backlash because initially the lure is moving fast but it looses speed if it starts to go straight up - but the spool is still spinning just as fast, which can result in a backlash.

 

another thing I did while learning is to remove the hooks on a rattle trap type bait and practice casting in your backyard or a park etc.

practice practice practice and you will be casting like Roland Martin in no time.

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13 hours ago, A-Jay said:

It's good that you want to learn "right away" - a positive attitude can be helpful, but I'd recommend that you keep reasonable expectations.  Otherwise you may become a victim of your own enthusiasm.   

Learning to cast & fish with a revolving spool reel takes some time & it's different for everyone.   I've watched Gene's videos as well as the good ones here on BR  http://www.bassresource.com/bass-fishing-videos/rods-reels-videos, they all offer solid info that if followed will help you learn. 

Best advise I can offer is to perfect how to cast smoothly, don't get concerned so much about distance.  That will come as you become proficient.

 Use 15 mono - something inexpensive and enjoy the process.

A-Jay

 

5 hours ago, WRB said:

Glenn's video is a good start and covered the basics.

The centrifical brake knob is also called the spool tension adjustment knob and important to adjust it as Glenn demonstrated.

I like to start beginners learning to cast a bait casting reel with a moderate action crank bait rod and 1/2 oz casting plug.  The slower action rod is more forgiving with the release point and starts the spool spinning slower than a fast action rod.

Also learn how to remove a backlash because they will happen, see the videos. 

Taping the spool line with about 50 yards of line works good, especially with braided line.

Buy a 1/4 lb spool of Berkely Big Game 12# mono and don't worry about loosing line when learning.

Good luck and welcome to bass fishing.

Tom

When I was learning these are the things I wish someone had explained me.

1. A Medium or Medium moderate rod helps tremendously. Crankbait rods are sweet for beginners. It is unreal how much of a cast is rod related.

2. A quality reel (generally in the $100 range) makes things easier. Its smoother and less prone to have other issues that may make learning more tedious/difficult.

3. Learn what each component of your reel does before you attempt to use the reel. Its a huge time saver if you know what to adjust to fix what is effecting your casting. Read your reels owners manual know how your reel works. 

4. A 1/2 oz plug is the only lure you need for starters. Also avoid light weight lures (1/4oz or lighter) until you are no longer having bad issues with casting.

5. Use this line Berkley® Trilene® Big Game™ for starters its cheap and easy to cast with. I prefer braid if I had to pick a backlash out but the Big Game over all is probably better for learning. 

6. The roll cast is probably the most forgiving style of cast. In other words you are less likely to muck it up vs other casting techniques. 

7. I just realized the title of the thread said "I am asking you experts, baitcasting 101 help????" Please understand I am no expert I am offering tips from my experiences learning. :ph34r:

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13 hours ago, fishnkamp said:

One important thing not mentioned here yet is this. You never mentioned what you picked up, meaning rod and reel and I do not care what brand.

I asked what rod and reel he got, but received no answer.

 

6 hours ago, WRB said:

The centrifical brake knob is also called the spool tension adjustment knob and important to adjust it as Glenn demonstrated.

Tom

I'm confused, Tom.  I thought the spool tension adjustment knob was often called the cast control knob.  On my reels the centrifugal brake adjustments are either inside the side cover, or a separate dial on the side cover such as on my Scorpion 4x4 SVS.  As far as I knew the centrifugal brakes had nothing to do with spool tension.  However, you have years and tons more experience than I so give me the skinny.  :D

 

1 hour ago, Hulkster said:

one thing that I find helps is to fully wait until the rod is loaded on your backcast before swinging forward, much like casting a fly rod.

I learned that way.  Actually when I first started using a b/c reel my cast was made with the rod starting from the rear position.  Not a good way to learn.  I would suggest learning with a roll cast.  That way the rod tip is much easier to keep loaded throughout the cast.  The roll cast doesn't require timing.  I do use an overhead cast...straight back, straight forward...when extreme accuracy is required otherwise I even use a slight roll cast on my overhead casts.

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Watch Glenn's video

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51 minutes ago, WRB said:

Watch Glenn's video

I've watched it before.  I watched it again.   This time I paid closer attention.  Glenn calls the cast control knob...at least what I've always understood to be the cast control knob (or more appropriately, spool tension knob)...the centrifugal brake control at the beginning of the video  I thought he had mis-spoken when watching previously.

Early on Glenn has a sub text apologizing for calling the "centrifugal brake" (which he states is the correct term)...the "pin brake".  Then at about 2:32 Glenn apologizes again with another sub text stating that what he had previously called the "centrifugal brake" is actually called the "spool tensioner".

So in order to keep things straight in my mind, I will consider centrifugal brakes as being the pins inside the side cover, and the knob under the handle either the cast control knob or spool tension knob.  Makes more sense to me then calling both centrifugal brakes.

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Since I am pretty much a Lew's user I will say this is what Lew's calls them on their website under features. 

Quote

Multi-Setting Brake (MSB) utilizing both an external click dial to adjust the Magnetic Brake System, and an internal 4-pin position on/off Centrifugal Brake System

 So in essence using their descriptions the dial on the outside of a RH bait caster from Lew's is for the Magnetic Brake. The pins inside(internal) the cover on the left side of the same reel would be the Centrifugal Brake.

The small knob on the right hand side of the same reel would be the spool tension adjustment knob also known as the Cast Control. I got the "Cast Control" by looking at the schematic of my reels. If you want to order a new knob for the spool tension adjustment the part is called Cast Control Cap. 

Not sure if that clarifies it any more or just mucks it up but I figured if these were the names of a major brand of reels they should be sort of universal. :)

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7 hours ago, S. Sass said:

Since I am pretty much a Lew's user I will say this is what Lew's calls them on their website under features. 

 So in essence using their descriptions the dial on the outside of a RH bait caster from Lew's is for the Magnetic Brake. The pins inside(internal) the cover on the left side of the same reel would be the Centrifugal Brake.

The small knob on the right hand side of the same reel would be the spool tension adjustment knob also known as the Cast Control. I got the "Cast Control" by looking at the schematic of my reels. If you want to order a new knob for the spool tension adjustment the part is called Cast Control Cap. 

Not sure if that clarifies it any more or just mucks it up but I figured if these were the names of a major brand of reels they should be sort of universal. :)

Not entirely correct.  I have Lew's reels and when they talk of the Multi-Settng Brake (MSB) they are referring to both brakes on the left side of a right hand casting reel.  The Centrifugal brake is the one on the inside of the left side cover and the magnetic brake is the dial on the outside of the cover.  The "cast control" knob (also known as the spool tensioner) is the dial under the star drag on the right hand side. 

So, yes, the knob on the right is a cast control by virtue of adjusting the tension on the spool but, it's not actually part of the "braking system".  It's the first adjustment made to the reel based on the weight of the lure being cast.  Then, after adjusting the spool tension, the braking system controls (one or both) are adjusted to prevent backlash.

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The weights on the pins are centrifical brakes, spool tension control knob puts tension on the spool shaft ends, magnetic brake adjustment is on the outside of the reel cover and usually numbered. I think we are all on the same page, Glenn's video gets the terms mixed up, but good instructions and he advises using your thumb to make final casting adjustments and not to rely on the braking system alone.

Tom

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I struggled with a baitcaster for a long time before it clicked.  

It was a combo of two things.  First, someone here suggested spooling up with 8lb Hybrid and using KVD Line and Lure.  It was like night and day compared to the 30lb braid I was using before.  It was so much easier to get the brakes dialed in and casting seemed to take much less force.

The second thing was watching pro-fishing/tournament videos.  Most instructional videos are filmed with a really tight shot, usually only upper body.  Pro-shot videos, with much larger budgets and multiple cameras, will give you full body shots, which was huge in showing me how to make different kinds of casts.  

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9 hours ago, Ray K said:

Not entirely correct.  I have Lew's reels and when they talk of the Multi-Settng Brake (MSB) they are referring to both brakes on the left side of a right hand casting reel.  No argument there pretty much what I said no? The Centrifugal brake is the one on the inside of the left side cover and the magnetic brake is the dial on the outside of the cover. This is pretty much what I said no? The "cast control" knob (also known as the spool tensioner) is the dial under the star drag on the right hand side. This also is pretty much what I said no? And all of it is exactly what Lew's has spelled out on their website and in their manuals. 

So, yes, the knob on the right is a cast control by virtue of adjusting the tension on the spool but, it's

not actually part of the "braking system".  It's the first adjustment made to the reel based on the weight of the lure being cast.  Then, after adjusting the spool tension, the braking system controls (one or both) are adjusted to prevent backlash.

I never said the "cast control" knob was part of any braking system. All I ever said concerning the "cast control" knob was the paragraph below. Never once did I mention part of any"braking system".

17 hours ago, S. Sass said:

The small knob on the right hand side of the same reel would be the spool tension adjustment knob also known as the Cast Control. I got the "Cast Control" by looking at the schematic of my reels. If you want to order a new knob for the spool tension adjustment the part is called Cast Control Cap. 

 So where again was Lew's website and literature"not entirely correct"? Everything I stated came directly from Lew's. I even said this is what Lew's calls them on their website under features so people could reference where I got the information. 

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Yeah, Glenn made a mistake.  It was corrected in the initial comments appended to the video.  'Nuff said.

 

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14 hours ago, S. Sass said:

I never said the "cast control" knob was part of any braking system. All I ever said concerning the "cast control" knob was the paragraph below. Never once did I mention part of any"braking system".

 So where again was Lew's website and literature"not entirely correct"? Everything I stated came directly from Lew's. I even said this is what Lew's calls them on their website under features so people could reference where I got the information. 

Initially I read your sentence about the magnetic brake differently and when I re-read it, it made more sense.  Sorry if I sounded condescending.  No disrespect meant.  :)

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Another item that you will need: patience.  I've never seen anyone master it as a beginner.  It takes time and lots of casting.  Some people try to use them, get back lashes, have problems, and then just give up because they're so frustrated.  Its like backing up a trailer.  I've never seen anyone master it the first time.  Eventually if you stick with it long enough you will master it and see the obvious advantages it has.

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The thing that helped me the most was learning how to deal with backlash. Typically, I can clear one under a minute.  Even the pros get backlash. It's how they manage it that makes them pros.

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