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Number of Black Bass Species

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How many different species of black bass have y'all caught?  Interested in seeing if anyone has caught all 10 species.

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Just 4 for me

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3. largemouth, smallmouth, spotted.

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How many different species of black bass have y'all caught?  Interested in seeing if anyone has caught all 10 species.

I didn't know there were 10 species of black bass. I've caught only 2, largemouth and smallmouth. I know of spots and coosa. Are you considering Florida-strain as a separate species?

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I didn't know there were 10 species of black bass. I've caught only 2, largemouth and smallmouth. I know of spots and coosa. Are you considering Florida-strain as a separate species?

From what I've read, Florida-strain largemouth are considered scientifically different than Northern Strain. Spots are also broken into two groups between Kentucky and Alabama (Coosa) strain. The other 6 are smallmouth, redeye, gaudalupe, suwannee, shoal, and choctaw.

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The Gaudalupe bass in west Texas is still hanging in there but in danger of joining the Witcita spotted bass in Cache creek OK is considered extinct since 1930.

Chocta bass is a newly recognized specie.

My black bass list caught;

NLMB

FLMB

SSpotted bass

NSpotted bas

Smallmouth bass 

California is reported to have both Red Eye and Shoal bass in NorCal streams, never had the opportunity to fish for them.

Tom

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So far I have caught the following black bass;

 

Florida strain largemouth bass

Northen strain largemouth bass

Suwannee bass

Smallmouth bass

 

Going on a couple vacations this year to add more black bass to my list. Have caught other fish that are called bass;

 

Temperate bass( True bass unlike the largemouth, smallmouth,etc);

Striped bass

Sunshine bass

White bass

 

Other fish called bass;

Butterfly peacock bass

Speckled peacock bass

Peacock bass hybrids

 

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I don't know how widely it is recognized but we have what they call MEANMOUTH here in MO.  They showed up about 15 years ago.  They are a natural cross breed of spots and smallmouth.

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1) smallmouth

2) northern largemouth

3) Florida largemouth 

4) Alabama spot 

5) Kentucky spot

6) meanmouth (probably doesn't count). 

I have friends that have caught redeye bass (micropterus coosae, not rock bass) in Tennessee but I don't think I have. They are only in 1 watershed in the whole state If I remember correctly

 

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I don't know how widely it is recognized but we have what they call MEANMOUTH here in MO.  They showed up about 15 years ago.  They are a natural cross breed of spots and smallmouth.

I don't think hybrids like meanmouth are officially recognized.  Still a fish I'd like to catch one day however.

 

 

The Gaudalupe bass in west Texas is still hanging in there but in danger of joining the Witcita spotted bass in Cache creek OK is considered extinct since 1930.

Chocta bass is a newly recognized specie.

My black back list caught;

NLMB

FLMB

SSpotted bass

NSpotted bas

Smallmouth bass 

California is reported to have both Red Eye and Shoal bass in NorCal streams, never had the opportunity to fish for them.

Tom

Do you know if the shoal bass in California are the same as the Shoal bass around FL/GA/AL?  I tried looking them up but couldn't find anything on them.

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Yes, they were transplanted from Florida around the early 60's, will try to look up which River? Stanisluas?

Red Eye bass are in the Feather River and lake Oriville and New Melones

Tom

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The scientific community agree on 9 species with another 11 species to consider.

 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/thefisheriesblog.com/2016/09/19/black-bass-how-many-species-are-there/amp/

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The only one I care about: biguns.

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Interesting topic.

 

According to Glenn Lau, creator of "Big Mouth" and "Big Mouth Forever" there are at least 6 different "sub-strains" of the Florida Strain LMB. He says the eggs can be pretty easily distinguished from one another, have differing growth rates, etc. Tha largest growing are extremely cannibalistic. This is from a man that has spent literally thousands and thousands of hours underwater studying and filming. Think I will go with what he says.

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"Sub-strain"?  Is that even a thing? I mean there are subspecies and there are strains.  I've never heard the term sub-strain used in any scientific classifications.

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35 minutes ago, davecon said:

Interesting topic.

 

According to Glenn Lau, creator of "Big Mouth" and "Big Mouth Forever" there are at least 6 different "sub-strains" of the Florida Strain LMB. He says the eggs can be pretty easily distinguished from one another, have differing growth rates, etc. Tha largest growing are extremely cannibalistic. This is from a man that has spent literally thousands and thousands of hours underwater studying and filming. Think I will go with what he says.

Sub-strains are not seperate species. When a northern LMB spawns with pure FLMB produces intergrades of the 2 species sometimes referred to as F1.

Tom

 

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Just a little more interesting info:

 

"F1" technically means "first generation."  So, in the scenario Tom presents, "F1" is the fist generation from the resulting cross.    Subsequent spawns from each descending generation would result in F2, F3, and so on.  It's often used when breeding wild caught fish, and other animals.  The F1 would be the first generation bred in captivity.

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17 minutes ago, J Francho said:

Just a little more interesting info:

 

"F1" technically means "first generation."  So, in the scenario Tom presents, "F1" is the fist generation from the resulting cross.    Subsequent spawns from each descending generation would result in F2, F3, and so on.  It's often used when breeding wild caught fish, and other animals.  The F1 would be the first generation bred in captivity.

 

The term F-1 is used in the scientific community to denote the offspring resulting from the mating of two different species, subspecies or genetic strains of animals. In this case, F-1 refers to the breeding of the two recognized subspecies of largemouth bass: Florida bass, Micropterus salmoides Floridanus, and the northern bass, Micropterus salmoides salmoides.

 

http://americansportfish.com/articles/37-tracking-the-tiger-tiger-bass-and-their-growth-in-the-southeast

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It's used in more than just crosses, @Catt In your example, it would properly be termed F1 hybrid.

I went to school for this stuff ;)

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14 minutes ago, J Francho said:

It's used in more than just crosses, @Catt In your example, it would properly be termed F1 hybrid.

I went to school for this stuff ;)

I've been invited to fish a private marsh full of em!

 

Wait! I didn't say that 😉

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1 hour ago, Catt said:

I've been invited to fish a private marsh full of em!

 

Wait! I didn't say that 😉

That's pretty awesome.  I've fished the Kingfisher Society's lake.  Those fish were something else.  Huge bodies, small mouths.  Length to weight ratio was nuts.  5 lb. fish that were maybe 18" long.  Fun time.  Genetics, food, water quality.

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11 minutes ago, J Francho said:

That's pretty awesome.  I've fished the Kingfisher Society's lake.  Those fish were something else.  Huge bodies, small mouths.  Length to weight ratio was nuts.  5 lb. fish that were maybe 18" long.  Fun time.  Genetics, food, water quality.

 

Well since the Catt is out the bag!

 

That's the why for the thread about braided line 😉

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Crap.  I need to send you something.  I'm an idiot.  Sorry bud!

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Larry Bothroff, San Diego City lakes Biologist, assigned to manage the Florida LMB program for the city corrected me when I called F-1 a hybrid, he told me the proper term was Intergrade. Larry also tried explained the various F designations between, pure FLMB and F-1's are not F-2's or F-1 and pure NLMB as F-3's as logic would have it, I don't recall exactly how the designators are grouped and a topic for another day.

Tom

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