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It's a 1996 Fifteen Foot Fiberglass Jon Boat and came with trailer for $250.

As somebody who mainly fishes from the bank or stream it's very exciting.

But before we take it out on the water i have to make sure it's all legal and fallow the rules and regulations.

I don't want to get into trouble.

Makes sense no?, Right so i'm now looking for some input on where i go from here and where i can take it and use it around me as i'm totally new to this boat owner stuff.

I did plan on getting some kind of motor like a trolling motor for it but wasn't sure if it's powerful enough to get us around.

I really don't want to have to use telescopic paddles unless i have to.

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a trolling motor will work if you don’t plan on fishing big water. a small outboard and bow mount trolling motor would be ideal. safety gear, seats, and running/trailer lights to get you started and make sure you research your state and local regs before putting her in the water. also, you can get a decent sonar for a little over a hundred bucks. i love that boat!

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That looks like it will be stable and comfortable to fish out of.  Congratulations!  I'm sure you checked it over before you bought it.....but don't forget to pull the wheel bearings and make sure they are good along with the axle splines.

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Go to the DMV website and see what forms you need to fill out and get it registered. I’d get a transom mounted TM first. Then a decent fish finder with GPS and map chip. Scout google maps for waters and access points. Have fun. 

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Interesting boat with a deck pedistal seat mount and no other seats. Several rod holder brackets and what appears to be a bare place in the stern for a seat?

I would flip this boat over and carefully check the bottom for holes or cracks before attempting to launch it. You need floatation cushions for PFD's at a minimum.

Take a photo of the backend of the transum, can't see if it has any support structure for a outboard engine.

Most states require a trailer to be licensed if towed on public roads and the boat needs to be licensed, you will need title/bill of sale for both.

Good luck, 

Tom

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Congrats on the boat! 

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Congratulations @Angealy on your new boat! Looks like at one time she was an experienced crappie fishing machine. Looking forward to seeing any plans you might have...

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That boat is a blank slate and you could build a bad bad badddd rig out of that thing . Options are limitless

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It is better then no boat. Congrats

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Don't get too excited just yet.

There are several major problems that are going to need resolving.

First on is making sure you have the proper paper work.  If not, You will need to have the registration number on the boat, and possibly the last decal number, run by the state game and fish to verify who the registered owner is.  If not the person you got the boat from, you need to see what they are going to require to register the boat.  Trust me, you are not going to like their answer if it was not the person you got the boat from.  It's usually a lot easier to deal with both in person if possible.  They can also answer you questions on required safety items and if you will be required to have a boater safety course.  Even if not required, being new to boating, you need to find one on line or something you can take.

Next, you are going to need to check with the tag office and see what they are going to require to register the trailer.  Some states make it pretty simple to just register it as a homemade trailer, so you might get by doing that. 

 

Now, for the real bummer.  If that boat has in the position it's in for a very long time, you may find you have a major problem with the boat.  If it's new enough it required floatation foam when manufactured and they used open cell foam, which was common in the 80's and early to mid 90's, it can be saturated with water and it does not dry out, adding a few hundred pounds of extra weight.  Also, the subfloor is most likely plywood with a layer of fiberglass over it.  Being left nose down like that, it's very probable the plywood has saturated with water and rotted of will rot before long.  Walk around in the front of the boat and kind of bounce up and down, see if the floor feels spongy.  There should be no movement.  Over time and with use, it will totally give way.

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"Interesting boat with a deck pedistal seat mount and no other seats. Several rod holder brackets and what appears to be a bare place in the stern for a seat?"

 

Looks to me like it was rigged for waterfowl with brackets around the edge to attach the blinds, etc. I helped a buddy camo paint a boat once upon a time and cover it up with burlap, reeds and cedar limbs so we could sit on one side and then both stand up in the open floor and shoot through the top of the blind. Nothing fancy, just homemade. It was still a lot easier than sinking cedar trunks in the river bottom, nailing boards to connect them and then using salvaged dock deck sections for the floor. And then brushing it up with cedar. I was younger then. A lot younger. And the tidal ice would eventually uproot the whole thing and take it downstream to the Chesapeake. The good old days. :)

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On 7/13/2019 at 2:04 AM, Angealy said:

But before we take it out on the water i have to make sure it's all legal and fallow the rules and regulations.

How to get a Motorboat or Jet Ski License


The Motor Vehicle Commission (MVC) issues motorboat and personal watercraft licenses for use on fresh, non-tidal waters or lakes, creeks or rivers not affected by tidal conditions. A boat license and New Jersey Boat Safety Certificate are required to operate a power vessel or personal watercraft - jet ski or wave runner - on non-tidal waters of New Jersey. A boat license is not required for non-powered vessels.

Step One: Complete a boating safety course 
For any power motorboat operation on tidal waters, you must successfully complete a boating safety course approved by the New Jersey State Police (NJSP) to receive a New Jersey Boating Safety Course Certificate. Visit the NJSP Marine Service Bureau website for full details.

Additional information is available:

Download a copy of the Boating Safety Manual

Boating is Alive & Well in New Jersey On The Water - Go Boating NJ Video

Step Two: Get an initial motorboat or jet ski license
You must be at least 16 years old. If you are under the age of 17, you need to present a letter with parental or guardian consent.

Applicants must visit a motor vehicle agency with:

New Jersey Boating Safety Course Certificate 
6 Points of ID 
Pay the $18 license fee

The MVC accepts American Express® card, MasterCard® card, Visa® card, checks, money orders and cash.

A license may be renewed by following the above steps for getting the initial license.

How to title and register a boat

In order to use New Jersey waterways, all boats must be titled and registered except:

  • Those not based in New Jersey or operating for less than 180 consecutive days.
  • Foreign vessels
  • U.S. public vessels
  • Ship's lifeboats
  • Non-motorized vessels used exclusively on small lakes and ponds on private property.
  • Racing vessels with New Jersey State Marine Police permit.
  • Non-motorized inflatable devices, surfboards, racing shells, dinghies, canoes and kayaks.
  • Non-motorized vessels less than 12 feet in length.
  • Tender/dinghy used solely for direct transportation between a vessel and shore.

*If your boat is 12 feet or less or if it is documented by the US Coast Guard, you will not receive a title.

How to get an initial boat title and registration

Boats must be titled within 10 working days of purchase or are subject to a $25 penalty.

  • Complete the Application for Certificate of Title for Vessel (OS/SS-27) and a Boat Registration Application Form BA-51 (found only at motor vehicle agencies)
  • Provide properly assigned Manufacturers Certificate of Ownership (MCO), title, or if coming from a state that does not title: proof of ownership from seller (their registration) along with a notarized bill of sale (Documented vessels see separate instructions below.)
  • If the boat is financed, provide the name and address of the lien holder. (All lien holders in NJ must have an Entity Identification Number {EIN} formerly corp code).  The original title will be sent to lien holder.

How to title and register a homemade boat

To title and/or register a homemade boat, visit a motor vehicle agency with proper identification (NJ Driver’s License, Non-driver ID, Passport or Birth Certificate)and the following:

  • Original receipts for all parts purchased
  • Notarized statement outlining all construction details
  • Fee payment: $60 for a standard boat or $85 for a financed boat
  • “HIN Investigation Report” form OS/SS-10A (found only at motor vehicle agencies) completed by the NJ State Police, Marine Division.
  • Completed Application for Certificate of Title for Vessel (OS/SS-27)
  • Completed Boat Registration Application Form BA-51 (found only at motor vehicle agencies)

How to register a Documented Vessel

Vessel documentation is a national form of registration. Documentation provides evidence of nationality for international purposes, provides unhindered commerce between the states and admits vessels to certain restricted trades, such as coastwise trade and the fisheries. A vessel must weigh at least five net tons, with the exception of certain oil spill response vessels and must be wholly owned by a citizen of the U.S. in order to be documented.

  • A vessel that is documented through the United States Coast Guard (USCG) will be issued a Certificate of Documentation.
  • If a boat is operated in New Jersey waters in excess of 180 days OR if the owner leases, owns, maintains or rents space in New Jersey for storage, mooring or servicing of the vessel on other than a transient basis, the documented vessel must be registered in New Jersey. Documented vessels do not receive NJ titles.

Applicant must visit a motor vehicle agency with:

  • A completed  Application for Certificate of Title for Vessel (OS/SS-27)**
  • Completed Boat Registration Application Form BA-51 (found only at motor vehicle agencies)
  • Proper identification (NJ Driver’s License, Non-driver ID, Passport or Birth Certificate.)
  • Certificate of Documentation (if customer will be keeping vessel documented) or deletion papers (if new owner will not be documenting vessel) from the USCG.
  • Official Coast Guard Bill of Sale

**Boats that are documented do not receive a NJ title. Fees are still charged to transfer ownership, record lien and/or change state of record for vessel.

Fee payment:

  • $60 for the title fee**
  • $85 for a financed boat title**
  • Pay the appropriate registration fee.

The MVC accepts American Express® card, MasterCard® card, Visa® card, checks, money orders and cash.

Sales and Use Tax for Boats & Vessels

Refer to the NJ Division of Taxation website for guidance on Sales and Use Tax for the purchase of boats and vessels.

 

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Make sure the tires, lug nuts, lights, wheel bearings and winch are all in good working condition. Nothing ruins a fishing day like a wheel falling of your trailer, trust me. If you don't know how to tow/back up a trailer make sure you practice before hitting the ramp. Always prepare your boat to launch before you back it in. Get all your required safety gear, Walmart has a good selection. Make sure you get your boating license and registration. Watch out for wake boats in a smaller craft.. Have fun and congratulations!

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Noice!

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Unless they recently changed the rules here in NJ, you don't need a boating license unless you are going to be off shore. If you are going to be on inland bodies of water you ONLY need to take the boating safety course if your boat is powered by a motor that is over 10 hp.

 

I stand corrected, you do need to take the Boat Safety Course for any motorized vessel. When I  went for my Boat Safety Course I did so because I knew I would have a boat with a motor greater than 10hp, but that was 3 years ago... so it might of changed. The license I'm still sure about. I don't have a boaters license and I've been checked twice by the Marine Patrol with no problems.

 

 

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