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Is Weight Color Important?

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I was wondering how important matching weight color to match your plastics? Has it effected your catch ratio? I would also like to know if it makes a difference on shaky heads as well?

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I personally dont think it matters too a hungry fish. Ive never noticed any difference,so i use unpainted. I also make my own jigs and use unpainted. I have had just as good luck weather they are painted or not. Being painted is just more eye catching for us humans....

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IMO it can make a difference. I fish a lot of t-rigs and have many times changed from a colored weight to a silver or vice versa and start catching them. I generally match the bait in clear water and fish silver weights in stained. 

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Just like everything else with fishing it's a confidence thing.  I generally use unpainted but I keep a black sharpie around just in case I need to blacken it.  On some occasions I think it made a difference.  Especially if the weights seem very bright.

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I match them. Does it really make a difference? IDK, but it doesnt cost that much more, and to me it looks better to disguise the weight a bit.

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I have found having a black weight helps when I T-rig.  Might have to do with where I am fishing, and how.....but, I get skunked every once in a while too.  :)

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I match them. Does it really make a difference? IDK, but it doesnt cost that much more, and to me it looks better to disguise the weight a bit.

Enough said.

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I'm going to say yes, but my research would be based on panfish and walleye jig n live bait fishing. These fish can be very particular about jighead colors, and can change preference quickly. For bass, I use primarily black bullet weights on my t-rigs, so I have nothing to compare it to.

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I only use black and green pumpkin bullet weights. Not sure if it matters or not, but it's a confidence thing with me.

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I don't know if it helps or hurts but I've done just fine without colored weights. I have some but haven't noticed much of a difference. In certain circumstances, like stroking or ripping a bait through weeds, I would like to think a silver weight looks like a small baitfish being chased by your bait.

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I like to try and match my plastic bait. Just as the other guys have said, it's strictly a personal confidence thing with me. I agree with what LgMouthGambler said, I like to try and make it look like one solid bait instead of a bait and a weight, if that makes sense. I especially like to do this with my baby paca craws while flipping, it looks so streamlined and "nice" with a matching weight. 

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Color may not make a difference to a very active bass competing for prey with other bass and if those are the fish you are able to catch, you are missing a lot bass that are not so active. Bass are very active maybe 5 to 10% of the time and those are low odds!

Paying attention to details can be very important, so use painted bullet weights or jig heads that are rigged close to soft plastics. The basics colors are black, brown, purple, green and pearl white. Use a color that is predominate in the soft plastic and it will make a difference in your strike ratio.

Tom

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If nothing else it's a confidence thing for me. 

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confidence for me. i usually use nail polish and paint some bullet weights black or green. mostly to match to worms or craws i use. nail polish seems to hold up to a beating also.

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Color may not make a difference to a very active bass competing for prey with other bass and if those are the fish you are able to catch, you are missing a lot bass that are not so active. Bass are very active maybe 5 to 10% of the time and those are low odds!

Paying attention to details can be very important, so use painted bullet weights or jig heads that are rigged close to soft plastics. The basics colors are black, brown, purple, green and pearl white. Use a color that is predominate in the soft plastic and it will make a difference in your strike ratio.

Tom

Big O says it is important, too. All of my weights and jig heads are painted.

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Big O says it is important, too. All of my weights and jig heads are painted.

Bam, question answered. I believe this thread can be closed now  :eyebrows:

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I'm going to say yes, but my research would be based on panfish and walleye jig n live bait fishing. These fish can be very particular about jighead colors, and can change preference quickly. For bass, I use primarily black bullet weights on my t-rigs, so I have nothing to compare it to.

 

That's pretty much my feelings on it too.

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LOL to some of your responses  ;)  and YES I think that color matters most when COLOR MATTERS MOST  :thumbsup:  I call it TWEAKING the bite to it's OPTIMUM.

 

With Finicky fish, pressured waters in clear and bright conditions, color is more important. Stained water and low light, not so much. There ARE times when the extra flash of a silver/brass/grey weight improves the bite on a T rig set up where the weight isn't pegged... It's possible that a fish thinks that your worm/creature SP is distracted, with it's attention on chasing a small object (your loose weight) to the bottom for feeding, giving the bass an opportunity to attack.

 

 Hope that helps...

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Brown or dark green (like xps tungsten green pumpkin blue flk) haves made much of a difference to me.

When you work the worm and its floating back down slowly from a twitch of your rod. The weight,being somewhat of a sand color, is virtually invisible to the eye of the fish. So I choose color. Your decision!

LG

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Thanks. Im fixing to put my order in for those awesome Megastrike shaky heads. I'm hoping to be very successful from the back deck this year in my club tournys!

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This time of year, since the bass have time to take a longer look at my bait, I will take a sharpie to the weights.

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