Jump to content
papajoe222

I'm My Own Worst Enemy..........

Recommended Posts

 on more occasions than I care to admit, at least.

 While I'm far from being an expert angler, accomplished would be my assesment, I would say I'm well informed. Given that I've been fishing for over 50 years, I'd say that I have put more time on the water than many and therefore experienced. Due to some physical limitations I'm not the most accurate caster. Add to those the fact this sport isn't just a hobby, it's a passion and that, I have recognized,  on many occasions is my stumbling block.  When it comes to catching fish,I am my own worst enemy.

I still have a difficult time sleeping the night before an outing and I can drive 12 hours without anything more than a break to gas up and grab a bite to go because I'm so pumped with anticipation.  The  problem that arrises from this is that I focus so intently on satisfying that urge to catch fish that I 'forget' most of what I've learned, ignore what experiences would dictate in a given situation and experience discomfort from attempting casts to totaly useless water.

I see this in most of the youngsters I've schooled over the years (minus the aches and pains). The experience is new and exciting and it is very difficult for them to focus.

I've also been in the company of anglers that are much more knowledgeable and experienced that have a completely opposite enemy, they over think, or suffer from a different form of tunnel vision because they are so focused they don't see what is obvious to most everyone else.

Similar to an drinking addiction, I realize the first step to recovery is admitiing, or recognizing the problem and I have come up with a multi-step solution for myself.

Do you have your own stumbling block  and if so, what do you think it is? More importantly, what steps can you take to combat your own worst enemy?  We all strive to be successful, but what if we ourselves are the reason we don't succeed on a regular basis? :Idea3:

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm extremely Hard Headed and if I think something should work, I will not give up on it even though it is proving it's not working. This wastes tons of time on the water. I've also had my Bud sitting in the front of the boat refuse to throw a Spinnerbait, because he doesn't like them, while I sat in the back putting the hurt on them. I'm going to strive this year to let the Bass dictate how to fish than my idea of what SHOULD work. Brian.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm the kind of person that once i get there i get all excited and have to go to the bathroom, but as for being my own worst enemy i tend to find it hard to try new techniques, i always catch myself going to the same baits that have worked for me in the past but when i try to pick up something new i get frustrated because i know i can catch a fish if i pick up a jig instead of a crankbait but thats my new years resolution this year!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ive been fishing for decades also. I am often late to the party with new techniques .I have still  not fished a dropshot. On the other hand , Im often ahead of the pack. Theres been several times where Ive had a good thing going then a year or several years later everyone is doing it . 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My weakness is I absolutely refuse to buy a spinning rod and finesse fish. That and I also again refuse to use anything but braid. On the bright side I have adapted to my weaknesses somewhat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of us have no problem picking up and using a new lure or technique. We approach the water and use all of our resources to best guess where the fish are going to be located.  Then we choose a bait that we think will work but yet will let the fish tell us what they want through analizing each bite, where the fish was located, how it was positioned in reference to the piece of structure, as well as how the fish ate the bait.  Then adjust to what the fish are telling us to improve our presentation and bait selection.

 

Then there are some of us that are hardheaded, fish a few different baits, fish the same way, cast aimlessly and do happen to catch fish but have no idea why the fish were where they were or why, will not change their approach even if they are getting smoked by their fishing partner, and have a hard time with adjustments and tend to lack of confidence in trying other techniques.  They fish the same way each time but still stumble their way into a fish or two but have no ambition to utilize all their resources that would make them a better angler..

 

Then their are some of us that over analize everything.  Like stated above become their own worse enemy due to impatience or just mental overload.  They second guess their own tactics and approaches, thus defeating themselves before they ever start.

 

As for myself, I choose to be the first one. Years of experience on the water in both a recreational as well as professional angler have helped me hone my abilities to be able to adjust on the fly and read the water, fall back on experiences and conditions in the past that were successful and use them to continue to be successful and adjust while also learning from every fishing trip and continue to pick up new techniques with new and unfamiliar baits.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having lost our daughter this year and myself having acute pancreatitis (should of have been flower food) this last year has changed many things.  I too was hell bent on getting to the lake and getting it DONE.  I still have the hunger ... I just approach it more slowly ... like eating a good meal ... you savor every bite.  I get up early now and take my time enjoying a couple cups of tea (doc says no coffee yet) and some breakfast.  Make a lunch and head out to get loaded to the boat.  Five or ten minutes don't mean that much anymore.  The gift of being on the water is truly a gift...as is time with family.

Tight Lines

  • Like 13

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My problem is fishing when I shouldn't be out. Like in the middle of a lightening storm, or on a 100 degree day with no water, or when it's very cold. I love fishing so much I tend to shrug it off, but especially in heat I get dehydrated really easily and have to watch out.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My problem is fishing when I shouldn't be out. Like in the middle of a lightening storm, or on a 100 degree day with no water, or when it's very cold. I love fishing so much I tend to shrug it off, but especially in heat I get dehydrated really easily and have to watch out.

Me too. When I was young I liked 100 degree weather . Would fish all day in it. Now I have to avoid it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My problem (as I see it) is that once on the water (early morning at first light) I don't want to leave, thus I stay too long and by the time I drive home I am fatigued. At age 75 I run out of energy by afternoon. Once in a while I have done short trips and I arrive home with average energy and that was nice. Help, I can't change :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Me too. When I was young I liked 100 degree weather . Would fish all day in it. Now I have to avoid it. 

 

Ha! The problem is, I'm still young. I got dehydrated in Minnesota!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have limited time to fish. I cant be out there everyday. I cant be out there once a week. But there is not a technique I cant quickly learn. I just dont have time to  do them all.  Most new techniques I come up with while on the water. My terminal tackle box gets a lot of use . 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ive been fishing for decades also. I am often late to the party with new techniques .I have still  not fished a dropshot. On the other hand , Im often ahead of the pack. Theres been several times where Ive had a good thing going then a year or several years later everyone is doing it . 

 

 

I'm approaching the half century of fishing myself and I'd recommend you give the drop shot an opportunity to prove itself.  It's a solid technique that takes fish when the bite is tough.

 Your description of having something going and then it becomes popular is one that applies here to the drop shot.

 

A-Jay

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm the guy who likes to experiment with baits to see what will get bit.

 

I especially like to do it when the bite is on.  Meaning, when the fish are obviously eating a bait well, I will cut that one right off and try baits that have yet to prove themselves.  Whether it's just a color change or even an entirely different bait, I want to test it's effectiveness and there's no better time than when I know the bass are there and eating.   Now the possible drawback to this is I'm probably missing a few bits while I'm switching back & forth and retying baits every 5 minutes.  But on the other hand, these times have afforded the opportunity to gain confidence in a few baits that on another day might be "The Bait".

 

Of Course, then the whole deal might start all over again.

 

A-Jay

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i would say my downfall tends to be fishing a particular body of water historically. 

 

I'm so excited to get there and catch something, waiting for the next high, that I revert to lures that worked for me in the past, only to be skunked.

 

Stuff under the water changes, and as drastic as the weather can be from one day to the other here in Indiana, the lake from one day to the next could be a whole different world. 

 

Sometimes I have to just turn off the classic oldies country station on the way, and literally talk through my strategies and factors for the day. I'm sure other motorists see me talking to myself and think I'm nuts. I have to factor in weather trends, (likely) water conditions, wind factors, what stage the bass are in, etc. That way I can have some sort of gameplan other than just using what worked two weeks ago in that spot. 

 

I'm a work in progress.....LOL

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It takes a rare breed of fisherman using simple techniques to perfection to consistently catch bass.

It doesn't matter if I'm preparing taking my 8 year old grandson out or if I'm preparing to fish the Bassmaster Classic...I know one way of fishing and one way only!

Tackle preparation, map study, review of weather patterns, observation of water conditions; then make proper on the water adjustments...it's all the same every time!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My biggest weakness is not realizing in a timely manner that what I am doing is not working. When the bite is/gets tough I just hunker down & continue doing what I'm doing. I need to adjust on the fly when depth/location or technique is wrong for that day.

 

Tenacity is a good trait but serves you best when you allow it to help solve the puzzle at hand. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

one of my biggest downfalls is tying on a few baits i want to use, then being too lazy to switch them out when they arent working...changing the type or color of a plastic is one thing, but having to choose which new baits to use and then tying them on is where i get lazy...

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In repeat fishing at the same small places each year the fish actually learn our baits and probably the scents I use too.

Don't be like a deer caught in the headlights frozen to throwing you favorite hot fish catching lure. Change up your baits the way a baseball pitcher changes his pitches. Be flexible and throw different baits, different sizes of baits and different colors. Get back to basics read the water conditions. Adjust the color to match the water and light conditions. Nothing is in cement. Don't rush, make each cast and presentation an Oscar trophy winning approach.

When it's slow I pull out every bait, practice every presentation.

On a tough day a firetiger or chartruese color could be your best color. I've seen the upper water conditions be slightly stained and the water clarity be muddy on the bottom. The under ground springs or under water turbulence can change the lower water clarity.

I've seen this happen. This is why I vary my baits and presentations till I get action.

The water conditions, the light conditions can limit what colors the bass can see. They can smell my scent, they can hear the rattle but they can't see it if the color isn't correct for the water conditions.

Failure isn't an option. Get in your zone, stay motivated and focused on your presentations. Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm addicted to action!!!!! As long as bass are hitting my lure I'm a happy camper. Give me a half hour of no action and its a miserable day. I would rather have 100 nice fish, then one big hawg and nothing else. I'm obviously not in a tournament mode. I love setting the hook regardless of what is on the other end.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In repeat fishing at the same small places each year the fish actually learn our baits and probably the scents I use too.

Bill

50 plus years & they aint learned my baits yet!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In repeat fishing at the same small places each year the fish actually learn our baits and probably the scents I use too.

 

 

 

If that were true there is not a bass in the world that would come anywhere

near a black jig with a blue trailer, a Senko in green pumpkin or something

as silly as a white spinnerbait with silver willow blades.

 

 

 

 

:winter-146:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a very hard time going from crankbaits back to plastics. I always fish them way too fast, then I could kick myself for doing it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×