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Just picked up my new tracker 170.  Was reading through the manual and noticed that they recommend trailering the motor trimmed in and that the transom rod is not intended to support the motor while traveling.  This seems a little off to me.  What do you guys do while traveling and storing? 

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I've used Transom Savers since they were invented.

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9 hours ago, dsidle61 said:

Just picked up my new tracker 170.  Was reading through the manual and noticed that they recommend trailering the motor trimmed in and that the transom rod is not intended to support the motor while traveling.  This seems a little off to me.  What do you guys do while traveling and storing? 

Every owners manual recommends this. Mercury recommends this. Real world....ain't gonna happen. Use something to support the motor. I've always used a transom saver someone mentioned motor mate which some seem to like. 6 of one, 1/2 dozen of the other

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If you can trailer the boat with the motor in the down position and have enough clearance then you don't need one.

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Buy a transom saver and be done with it.

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Thanks guys, the boat came with one and I plan on using it.  Just wanted to see what other guys did.  

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On May 14, 2016 at 11:34 PM, dsidle61 said:

 Was reading through the manual and noticed that they recommend trailering the motor trimmed in and that the transom rod is not intended to support the motor while traveling.  

 

On May 14, 2016 at 9:24 AM, slonezp said:

Every owners manual recommends this. Mercury recommends this.

I'm surprised to hear this.  Any ideas why would they recommend not using a transom saver?  I use mine religiously.  It came with my Tracker Pro170.

Tight lines,

Bob

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1 hour ago, desmobob said:

 

I'm surprised to hear this.  Any ideas why would they recommend not using a transom saver?  I use mine religiously.  It came with my Tracker Pro170.

Tight lines,

Bob

I want to say because of shock from road hazards traveling directly from the trailer to the motor with no buffer, but I'd just be guessing

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1 hour ago, slonezp said:

I want to say because of shock from road hazards traveling directly from the trailer to the motor with no buffer, but I'd just be guessing

Makes sense.  I guess I didn't consider that because the part of my transom saver that the outboard motor rests on is thick, soft rubber.

Tight lines,

Bob

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Exactly right. While it saves your transom from the 200# bouncing up and down, the force doesn't just disappear.. it weakens it but what force is there gets transferred to your motor supports and trim assembly. What can cause major damage is if the back end of the boat moves while trailering with a transom saver, it is VERY important to have your tie down straps as tight as possible. One big pothole or dip in the road without proper tie downs and you could be dragging your motor down the road. 

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19 minutes ago, desmobob said:

Makes sense.  I guess I didn't consider that because the part of my transom saver that the outboard motor rests on is thick, soft rubber.

Tight lines,

Bob

I was a bit surprised when i read this as well.  I used it today and seemed to do well.  I just dont want to risk trailering with the motor down and dragging it on a hill. 

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The transom saver doesn't really "save the transom."  I had a long conversation about this with the head mechanic last month.  The idea behind the transom saver is to "save the hydraulic lift" on the outboard.  Transoms are engineered and designed to take on a ton of weight and stress but the hydaulic lift on the outboard needs to be supported while going up and down the road.  I got talked into a hardened rubber piece about the same price that is about the size of a TV remote that just slides onto the exposed hydraulic bar when the motor is about halfway up.  I slide the support in, and bring the motor down to tighten it.  Its much easier to use than a transom saver and I've been told it works just as effective.  I can take a photo sometime.

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The main reason that motor manufacturers do not recommend them is twofold.  First, they do not manufacture them, and it would be a serious liability for them to recommend something they do not make.  Second is that they recommend towing with the motor down because it takes the strain off the hydraulic system.

However, they do not assume any responsibility for any damage caused to the lower unit if the skeg makes contact with the road or railroad tracks, etc., while under way.

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I've seen a lot of discussions about this...I've use transom savers on some of my boats (had three of them break on a Lund Pro-V with a 150 on it...that told me some kind of shock was getting transferred someplace...I went to the M-Y Wedge on my last two boats.  It works as well as anything else at taking the strain off the hydraulic system and doesn't transmit any shocks from the trailer to the lower unit...which makes my happy even thought I'm not convinced it's really a problem.

I heared some folks talk about trailering with the motor in a vertical position...but I've never owned a boat/trailer package that'd allow me to get anywhere this without risking banging the skeg on something coming out of a steep driveway...

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M-Y Wedge is the term I was attempting to describe above in my previous post.

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1 hour ago, gimruis said:

M-Y Wedge is the term I was attempting to describe above in my previous post.

They make some different products - the U-shaped one you've got, and the ones I use that look like this:

209355_ts.jpg

 

wedge3.jpg

s-l1000.jpg

...they say you can just use one, but it offends my sense of symmetry...or I'm a belt and suspenders guy...or I'm just obsessive about some stuff...I use two.

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I did the research and asked around, called Yamaha and spoke with an engineer for a local boat manufacturer and they both recommended that if clearance is not an issue than trailer your boat with the engine trimmed down and jack plate all the way down.  However, I don't know of one bass boat that can clear the road when fully trimmed down, so I use a product called Moto-Stop, yes expensive and most likely over kill since you can basically do the job with a correctly fitted piece of PVC, but to each his own. Here is what Yamaha has to say about it:

 

How should I transport my Yamaha outboard motor?

Proper transportation is important, because an improper transport can cause damage to your outboard, or boat or trailer, and, more seriously, could lead to personal injury. Check your Owner’s Manual carefully for instructions, as the procedures vary from model to model. Yamaha now offers an accessory for transporting called “Outboard Trailering Support.” Learn more about the Outboard Trailering Support, as it is not designed to be used with every model. You may visit the Parts & Service section to view owner's manuals for 1998 and newer outboard motors or you can order your manual online.

 

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2 hours ago, WIGuide said:

Interesting:

Quote

Another approach is a composite tube, such as the Yamaha Outboard Trailering Support, that clips over the outboard’s trim rod (or ram) with the engine trimmed up. Insert the tube over the trim rod, and then trim the unit down until the weight of the outboard is on the tube.

...the Yamaha Outboard Trailering Support is a M-Y Wedge with a Yamaha logo on it:

boaterslogvol3_no20imgxl3.jpg

...I'd take that as a pretty strong endorsement.

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On 5/20/2016 at 3:19 PM, Further North said:

Interesting:

...the Yamaha Outboard Trailering Support is a M-Y Wedge with a Yamaha logo on it:

boaterslogvol3_no20imgxl3.jpg

...I'd take that as a pretty strong endorsement.

  To me the M-Y Wedge/ Yamaha support whatever is essentially the same thing as a transom saver, just instead of the bottom being attached to the trailer is on the jackplate, or am i really missing something here?  Mine has a nice thick rubber V that you trim the motor down onto and it rests snug in there. 

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The only difference I see between the M-Y Wedge/Yamaha support and a transom saver is there is no chance of a shock from the trailer getting transmitted to the lower unit.

Given that I broke three transom savers on my old Lund Pro-V's trailer...I think there's something to this...but there's all kinds of boat owners running transom savers that love them.

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