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I've been bass fishing for a little while now and have got decent at doing it. Up to this point I have been using spinner reels only because it it what I was used to and I could cast super accurate, however I just bought a baitcasting setup and can now cast it fine but I encounter two problems. 1. Casting it not just far but accurate 2. Casting light baits (weightless top ribbit frogs or senkos) the accuracy thing may just take me practicing some more but I figured I'd ask for advice. Thank our for your help!

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33 minutes ago, KentuckyFriedAngler said:

I've been bass fishing for a little while now and have got decent at doing it. Up to this point I have been using spinner reels only because it it what I was used to and I could cast super accurate, however I just bought a baitcasting setup and can now cast it fine but I encounter two problems. 1. Casting it not just far but accurate 2. Casting light baits (weightless top ribbit frogs or senkos) the accuracy thing may just take me practicing some more but I figured I'd ask for advice. Thank our for your help!

1: you have used spinning reels far longer the bait casting reels.

2: a Stanley Ribbit or Senko are not light lures! If you can't cast these with distance & accuracy... Ya can't cast!

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With bait casters, there are lots of variables that come into play when trying to achieve distance and/or accuracy. Both with lures on the low end and high end, but light lures will definitely be harder to learn to control.

First and foremost is experience. You have to learn how to be able to back the brakes and tension off a little and use your thumb to keep the reel from backlashing to get the longest casts possible. You also have to learn the best casting motion for the target you are aiming at. Many times a sidearm, roll cast, or pitch will be much more accurate than overhand casting.

Your equipment also matters a lot. What reel/rod/line are you using? A quality reel will have better braking systems like dynamic magnetic, centrifugal, and dual braking systems that will help you to learn to cast more quickly than one with a simple magnetic system in most cases, especially with lighter baits. Also most reels aren't going to do well much below 3/8, no matter what rod and line you use. Rods also play a big part. If you are using a stiff rod with a mh or heavy power, it isn't going to load well with lighter baits and won't transfer enough speed and energy to the bait to get a good cast. Likewise, if you use a med or med light, you aren't going to be able to cast heavy baits well because it overloads the rod. A more moderate action loads better, but won't set the hook well with most bottom bouncing stuff. The length of the rod makes a difference also.Generally, a longer rod casts farther, and a shorter rod is more accurate. Line matters as well. Thicker diameter lines won't come off the spool as fast and cast as far as a thinner diameter. Which us why many use braid. Too thin braided line can "dig in" on itself though,  and cause backlashes and poor casts. This is when the line you are reeling gets pressed into the line on the spool. 

Any of these issues could be part of the problem, but more than likely you just need more practice with your setup. Try using heavier more aerodynamic baits at first like jigs, lipless cranks, spoon, and top water walkers like spooks. Practice casting and pitching with different motions in the yard with a jig and use a paper plate or something for a target. Try to get proficient with heavier stuff, then move to the lighter end of the spectrum. Also if you get time let us know what your setup is, and maybe there's some things that could be tweaked. Just keep practicing though and hang with it and it will come in time. 

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1 hour ago, Paul Roberts said:

Google "Stan Fagerstrom" and "casting".

see above…...

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You need to learn how to use the casting reel because as Catt has mentioned, the Ribbit and Senko are very easy to cast as they both have more than enough weight.

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Stan Fagerstrom takes you back to the pistol grip era of the 70's, interesting nostalgic video.

Loomis rods, Stren line and Shimano 100 bait casting reel. If I recall correctly Stan was from Washington, Glenn's home area. I use all those basic casting techniques every outing except with today's longer trigger grip rods, the loop cast most often for close accurate targets.

5/8 oz casting plug is the ideal practice weight and hula hoop on the lawn or water (they float) is a good size target to learn with and move out further as you get better at the short distances.

Glenn's vedio is basically the same technique that Stan is teaching, so watch his bait cast instructional video.

Tom

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You need to completely change your casting style when making the switch to a baitcaster setup.  The whip style that you used with a spinning reel is all problems with a casing setup.  This was the biggest step for me, and i also chose reels with good braking systems.  I started on a daiwa advantage 153htsl.   I own over 30 reels now including several steez baitcasters and i still use my advantages.  Sure there a little bigger and heavier but they are built like a tank and i believe was the platform that the current tatula was made from.  The bonus is that they can be found for supper cheap used and are salt water safe.

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Learn about the brakes and tension settings for your baitcaster.  Then go out in the backyard and practice casting with it. Remember that once the bait is in the air the wind can take it, and adjust your cast accordingly.

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First, watch this (it includes tips on casting):

 

Then, watch this for tips on casting accuracy:

 

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It's also important to make sure you're using an appropriate line and lure weight for your rod

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You are right Tom.  Stan lived in Longview and worked for the Daily News for 40 years.  He lived on Silver Lake and wrote three books. I've known Stan since 1979 and he was something with a rod and reel.  Shag Shegrud was another amazing caster.  One of the keys Stan showed me was a more moderate action rod allowed easy loading and unloading during the casting motion. Stan also had millions of hours of practice. He could cast around a corner.  

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