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derekoz22

Braided, Monofilament, or Fluorocarbon line?

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I use all three at one point or another.  They each have both beneficial & detrimental properties.  To be successful, one needs to select the line that best suits each fishing situation.

And for a beginner - mono is the way to go.  Especially for someone learning how to use bait casting tackle.

A-Jay

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14 minutes ago, derekoz22 said:

What type of fishing line (braided, monofilament, fluorocarbon) do you guys prefer for bass and why?

All braid, all the time. Why? Because I don't like lines that stretch.

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All mono all the time . You confused yet  ?

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Monofilament line is probably the best choice for a new bass fisherman.

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I have a braid that sinks... it's nice. I like braid all the time as well, probably because I'm usually using spinning tackle. Sometimes with a floro leader for weightless plastics. 

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36 minutes ago, A-Jay said:

I use all three at one point or another.  They each have both beneficial & detrimental properties.  To be successful, one needs to select the line that best suits each fishing situation.

And for a beginner - mono is the way to go.  Especially for someone learning how to use bait casting tackle.

A-Jay

Can I ask why mono is suggested when learning to use a baitcaster? I followed that advice for a while, got annoyed with constant backlashes that required me to cut out line, and decided to give braid a try (it's all I use for my saltwater stuff). Haven't had any issues since. Any backlashes u do get are easily pulled out because the braid doesn't bind to itself under pressure like mono would.

I'm not sure if it's because I switched (I'm used to braid, so it worked better for me.), or I just happened to get better at casting around the same time.

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Braid for frogs and most texas rigs and jigs in vegetation, sometimes shakyheads, senkos, ned rigs and other plastics on spinning. Mono or copolymer for most everything else, especially moving baits, topwaters, and anything with trebles.

Fluoro is the only one I don't use.

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1 hour ago, BrackishBassin said:

Can I ask why mono is suggested when learning to use a baitcaster? I followed that advice for a, got annoyed with constant backlashes, and decided to give braid a try (it's all I use for my saltwater stuff). Haven't had any issues since. I'm not sure if it's because I switched (I'm used to braid, so it worked better for me.), or I just happened to get better at casting around the same time.

I don't exactly understand your response but 15 pound mono is about as easy as it gets when learning to cast revolving spool gear, and easy is a relative term.

 Also the beginner can sometimes have a few backlashes.  If & when the over runs are bad to the point where it can not be "picked out" - cutting it out may be the final option.  Cutting out mono that's 9 bucks for 1,00 yards may be more desirable than cutting out other types of line that can & do cost quite a bit more.  

A-Jay

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I Never use mono to much streach. I use 8 pound floro on my spinning for my super finesse -drop shot , split shot ect

I use 12-16 pound floro on a baitcaster for what I like to call heavy finesse- mostly jerbaits and some crank baits.

Braid on a baitcaster for heavy situations- frogs, jigs and whenever I'm pitching or flipping in cover.

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They all have their uses.  Mono certainly costs less than fluro or braid but it stretches too.  It can sometimes also be about personal choice and preference.

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Nylon monofilament most of the time, copoly is my second choice, braided and fc at the bottom.

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I used to only use two lines, 50lb Spiderwire braid on the bait casters and Stren 6lb mono on the spinning reels. That's all dad ever used. No leaders either. This year I started trying a bunch of different lines and learned to tie a uni-uni and used a leader on my t-rig rod. Of all the new stuff I tried, I would say 14lb smoke colored Fireline on a spinning reel was the most impressive. Casts an incredible distance, no memory, strong. My biggest disappointment would be P-line CXX 12lb and Flouroclear 6lb. Way too much memory for me, coiled up on top of the water after only a few trips.

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Yes, the answer to the question is yes. 

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I love braid but I use all 3. Fluoro (as a mainline anyways) gets the least use from me. Actually I rarely use straight mono either, it's usually copoly. 

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8 hours ago, Lumbe34 said:

I Never use mono to much streach. I use 8 pound floro on my spinning for my super finesse -drop shot , split shot ect

I use 12-16 pound floro on a baitcaster for what I like to call heavy finesse- mostly jerbaits and some crank baits.

Braid on a baitcaster for heavy situations- frogs, jigs and whenever I'm pitching or flipping in cover.

The stretch mono has is equivalent or in some cases less than the stretch of fluorocarbon. The difference is that fluorocarbon stretches and stays that way but it is only a little at a time while mono reverts back and that is why anglers believe one stretches and the other doesn't. I use braid for frogs and heavy flipping only, the rest is done with mono and lately it has been Spider Wire Ultimate Mono, it is very thin diameter compared to other mono lines, it has the abrasion resistance of fluorocarbon yet handles better and has low stretch. My only complaint is that it has more memory than other mono lines, in fact it is similar to fluorocarbon but it a little better and a little KVD L&L works wonders, a small price to pay given the knot strength is vastly superior to fluorocarbon.

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10 hours ago, A-Jay said:

I don't exactly understand your response but 15 pound mono is about as easy as it gets when learning to cast revolving spool gear, and easy is a relative term.

 Also the beginner can sometimes have a few backlashes.  If & when the over runs are bad to the point where it can not be "picked out" - cutting it out may be the final option.  Cutting out mono that's 9 bucks for 1,00 yards may be more desirable than cutting out other types of line that can & do cost quite a bit more.  

A-Jay

What I was saying was that I tried mono first on my baitcaster and had lots of issues with it. Haven't had any issues since I went to braid. That's all.

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1 hour ago, BrackishBassin said:

What I was saying was that I tried mono first on my baitcaster and had lots of issues with it. Haven't had any issues since I went to braid. That's all.

Got it.   And like I referred to previously here, handling properties of each line are a little different ( and can vary wildly between brands for the same line as well).  As you discovered, you prefer those of braid.  To each his own. 

I like & dislike them all at one point or another.

:smiley:

A-Jay

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I fish with monofilament (Trilene XT 14 and 17 pound test) on a baitcaster just about 100% of the time. It works very well for the style of bass fishing I prefer.

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Baitcasters - 90% fluorocarbon

Spinning - 90% braid

Why? because....:P Actually, braid for handling & line management, and fluorocarbon for density.

-T9

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13 hours ago, A-Jay said:

I use all three at one point or another.  They each have both beneficial & detrimental properties.  To be successful, one needs to select the line that best suits each fishing situation.

And for a beginner - mono is the way to go.  Especially for someone learning how to use bait casting tackle.

A-Jay

This!  I tend to use fluoro for my bottom contact baits as much as possible.

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