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NHBull

C-Rig vs drop-shot

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Admididally these techniques make up a small percentage of time in hand.

 

My question is, what technique when?

 

I find myself in situations lend themselves to both and naturally go for the dropshot by default.

 

Any input is appreciated as I really what to get comfortable with all techniques 

 

Thanks,Al

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I use the C-rig with a 3/4 ounce weight  to cover deep water fast . 

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Think of the Carolina rig as more of a search rig that covers the deeper water spectrum on ledges, etc. whereas a drop shot is more of a technique to use once a concentration of fish has been located, similar to a Texas rigged plastic that is thrown once fish are located via squarebill or spinnerbait.

 

Hope that helps!

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C-rig when they're looking down, Dropshot when they are looking up.  

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Usually by my graphs and where they are located.  If they are hugging the bottom, normally they are C-rig fish.  If they are suspended, then a drop-shot.  I will throw both and see which one works.  

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The drop shot has all but replaced the c-rig for me. I haven't thrown the old ball and chain very much at all this year.

 

For me...the advantages are easier bite detection and hooksets. Plus more fish it seems.

 

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2 hours ago, Attila said:

Think of the Carolina rig as more of a search rig that covers the deeper water spectrum on ledges, etc. whereas a drop shot is more of a technique to use once a concentration of fish has been located, similar to a Texas rigged plastic that is thrown once fish are located via squarebill or spinnerbait.

 

Hope that helps!

 

I agree with this, but with that said, I find myself throwing the dropshot a lot more than the C-rig even when I understand when to throw one over the other lol

 

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Horizontal vs vertical.

Tom

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The major difference between the two rigs is that the sinker on a Carolina rig lies in 'front' of the hook,

while the sinker on a drop-shot rig lies 'below' the hook.

 

With a Carolina rig, a taut line gives the angler direct contact to the sinker, but contact with the bait

is indirect, as it depends on the tautness or slackness in the leader. For this reason, a heavy sinker

can be used on a C-rig without the weight directly affecting the action of the bait.

Carolina rigs are best suited for deep water, windy weather and for area coverage.

 

With a drop-shot rig, a taut line gives the angler direct contact to the hook and bait,

and movement at the hook is directly transmitted to the rod. Inversely, any rod-tip movement

on a taut line is directly transmitted to the bait, unlike a C-rig. Drop-shotting is a highly versatile rig,

and though it lacks the area coverage of a Carolina rig, it gives the angler greater control & sensitivity.

 

In my case, I always have a paper route of waypoints that I fish on the way out,

and again on the way in. So I have no use for the ball-and-chain search bait, as it were (C-rig).

For me at least, the choice of bottom rigs is between a jig, drop-shot rig and shaky head.

 

Roger

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NHBull I know this isnt answering your question but a drop shot is one of those rods I have tied on every time I hit the water.

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1 hour ago, Fishin' Fool said:

NHBull I know this answering your question but a drop shot is one of those rods I have tied on every time I hit the water.

Good enough for me, thanks 

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1 hour ago, NHBull said:

Good enough for me, thanks 

 

This was two weeks ago from tomorrow. Easily caught 50+ fish that day almost all on a drop shot.

20170601_135924-1-1.jpg

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Drop shot ALL SUMMER.

C-Rig.   NEVER.

A-Jay

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I've only been fishing it for a couple of years but I can say I've caught them in cold water..warm water. I've seen it work on clear sunny days in clear water and as I found out this past Sunday night, it also works in stained water at night. Its to the point where when I am throwing something else and not getting bit, I'm eyeballing that DS rod on the deck..maybe too early.

 

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Although a C-rig has been a staple, deep water presentation for me over the years, a 'bubba' drop shot has all but replaced it.  I'm casting it most often and a short (18in.) drop to the heavier weight keeps the bait just off the bottom for the majority of my retrieve.  That's where I prefer a C-rig's bait, but bite detection isn't only easier to detect, I feel I'm missing fewer bites now.  I'm still covering water as quickly.  The only downside is I used tungsten or brass weights for C-rigs and I'm using all lead for the 'bubba' rig so I sacrifice a little of the bottom information.

 

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C rig is for covering water, while the dropshot is a target rig. Fling the C rig across a point until you find some fish, then park over the top of them and drop the DS down to them and shake it in their faces.

 

I hate fishing both of them, but there's not denying how effective they are. 

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There seem to be a lot of self imposed restrictions put on the drop shot. A drop shot is a hook/lure up the line with a weight on the end..that's it. You can use the popular DS type plastics or any other. I throw the same worms I throw on a T-rig. Drag it along with pauses in between. When you hit the sweet spot...let it soak longer on semi tight line.  With my lake , the thermocline setups up at 8-12 feet so I'm fishing it more horizontally than vertically. I do use spinning gear..but would have no problem bumping line size on a casting reel, I just don't have a need here. Get out and sling one this summer.

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I fish there Carolina rig when covering a large amount of area with roaming or spread out fish. I power shot some of the same areas if the fish are holding tighter to cover. The power shot allows you to work the bait stationary when you feel something different in the bottom composition. Traditional finesse-y drop shot is a little different game.

 

C-rigs still have a time and a place, and a lightweight Carolina rig is super under-utilized for locating spread out neutral to negative fish.

 

-Jared

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46 minutes ago, KCFinesse said:

I fish there Carolina rig when covering a large amount of area with roaming or spread out fish. I power shot some of the same areas if the fish are holding tighter to cover. The power shot allows you to work the bait stationary when you feel something different in the bottom composition. Traditional finesse-y drop shot is a little different game.

 

C-rigs still have a time and a place, and a lightweight Carolina rig is super under-utilized for locating spread out neutral to negative fish.

 

-Jared

Define light weight C-rig;

Carolina rig with bead and weight less than 1/2 oz.

Slip shot rig /finesse C-rig, rigged on main line without swivel.

Mojo rig, split shot rig using a pegged mojo cyclinder weight on main line.

All are excellent horizontal presented rigs, weight in front of lure.

Drop shot is weight below the lure presented vertically.

You can cast and drag a drop shot rig and fish a C-rig vertically, you will catch more bass however fishing a drop shot vertical and casting a C-rig horizontal.

Tom

 

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On June 14, 2017 at 6:56 AM, Skunked again said:

How do you know when their looking up or down?

By the type of prey they are feeding on.

The bass look up for pelagic baitfish, terrestrial critters or anything in the mid to top of the water column. Bass look down for dermasel baitfish, crawdads or anything on or near the bottom.

To determine where the bass are located use your sonar unit or catch few and take note where and how they strike.

Tom

 

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I use it vertical and horizontal.  Caught some nice bass dragging across points like a c-rig.  Just need to use right weight

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Here's a fun fact since I have been going to lake St Clair in Michigan for 14 years....In the early days, you could not throw a dropshot on St Clair.  Why you ask?  Because of a bleed over regulation from the other species on the lake.  The Michigan DNR in order to control "Snagging" of fish ruled that ANY presentation where the weight was below the hook is prohibited.  It has since been changed.  ;) 

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I’m just getting into d-shot but I’ve really recognized it’s superior versatility for some time. It’s vertical and horizontal like ppl say. The one advantage of c-rig is that it’s free floating so it does look more natural when on the move imo. 

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A lot of people use the c-rig to search water... I don't. I don't really like the c-rig much cause for me it is very unproductive. Dopshot on the other hand... highly productive. Yes, it is slower but that is normally what I want. I use it slowly and methodically search an area. It tells me all the same things as a c-rig does about contour, just on a slower scale. It can be used for fish looking up or down depending on how it is rigged. A short dopshot is a "power shot" rig technically and can be used when the fish are low in the water column, just like the c-ig is, but slower. I love the dopshot when I am fishing for baitfish, especially along banks. Want to make those perch come out of their grass hideouts? Throw the dropshot and fish it very slowly. Ned rig slow. It'll also work for catfish, bass... you name it. There's a lot of ways to ig and run them, but the right answer depends upon the circumstance. I'm hardly an expert at them, but I've done well on dropshots. Lot better than I have on c-rigs.

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