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@reelChris

Pre-rigging plastics?

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I grew up salt water fishing using a snap swivel at the end of my rod and pre-tied rigs for natural bait that terminated in a tied loop so that they could be quickly changed.  Last year I rigged up most of my plastics the same way - using mono with a hook on one end, and a loop tied on the other so I could quickly change rigs with other bait types, colors or techniques.  I've tried attaching the pre-rigged plastics using a snap swivel at the end of my main line, and directly tying main line to the rig end loop and had plenty of hangups without ever breaking at the attachment point between the main line and plastic rig.  However, no one else I've seen freshwater fishing does this, which leads me to the question - why not?  

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Two likely reasons:

1.  Super smart bass can see the extra line, snaps, swivels and stuff and avoid your lure.

2.  Extra 'stuff' can change, even detract, from the 'action' of your lure.

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8 minutes ago, Choporoz said:

Two likely reasons:

1.  Super smart bass can see the extra line, snaps, swivels and stuff and avoid your lure.

2.  Extra 'stuff' can change, even detract, from the 'action' of your lure.

This.

 

You want to present the lure to the bass in the best way possible, from as natural looking as possible to the best action possible.

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The more stuff you have between your bait and the main line the more likely you are to have something that will fail and maybe cost you the fish of a lifetime.

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I would think that the more you have between the hook and main line would take away from not only the feel of what the bait is doing but any subtle pick-up/bite from a bass.

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More points of failure. Consistent knot tying is one the most crucial elements of fishing. It should be able to be done like second nature smoothly and seamlessly and not seen as a determent in any way. Practice makes perfect.

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Pre rigged hooks are common and sold by the card as bait holder rigs usually a 8" long leader or trout lake rigs with 36" long leaders. Lots of bass anglers pre rig Carolina rigs for example, so it's done.

The down side to pre rigs is poor knot strength because leaving knots tied long term weakens the leader materials. The next issue is multiple knots are required, 3 at a minimum, with the loop knot being the weakest link.

Tom

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I use a mustad fastach clip for moving baits on the same rod. Makes it easy for me to change weight, color, lure type quickly and efficiently, which is half of my battle because I only get 3-4 hours fishing on weekends.

 

I do check the line often, and after every fish catch and retie as necessary though. 

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3 hours ago, Choporoz said:

Two likely reasons:

1.  Super smart bass can see the extra line, snaps, swivels and stuff and avoid your lure.

2.  Extra 'stuff' can change, even detract, from the 'action' of your lure.

I agree and will add one more reason.

3.  Tying on a swivel allows you to switch baits easily without retying.  Retying often is a good thing.  I’ve lost more fish than I care to think about because I was too lazy to retie.

 

I do pre rig Carolina rigs.  C-rigs take three knots,  pre rigging cuts that down to one.

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Pre rigged hooks or pre rigged plastics?  I don't leave plastics on any of my hooks because most of them have a salt content that eats hooks quickly.  I have pre rigged c-rig setups but that's the only bait I throw that has more than 1 knot.  I tie everything direct.  Always have always will.  

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I have timed myself and at this point I can tie a good solid Trilene knot in about twice the time it takes me to fuss with a clip.  So if it takes me 30 seconds to tie a knot and 15 seconds to use a clip, that’s a 15 second savings every time I swap out a lure.

 

 

Even changing lures 10 times in a day of fishing is a lot for me so I would be saving 2-3 minutes total out of a full day.  Not worth it to me. 

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4 minutes ago, fishwizzard said:

I have timed myself and at this point I can tie a good solid Trilene knot in about twice the time it takes me to fuss with a clip.  So if it takes me 30 seconds to tie a knot and 15 seconds to use a clip, that’s a 15 second savings every time I swap out a lure.

 

 

Even changing lures 10 times in a day of fishing is a lot for me so I would be saving 2-3 minutes total out of a full day.  Not worth it to me. 

You can save even more time if you learn to tie the Pitzen knot.  I can tie it with gloves on in about 12 seconds on average.

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5 hours ago, TOXIC said:

I tie everything direct.  Always have always will.  

This is the only way to do it, in my opinion.

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2 hours ago, Jig Man said:

You can save even more time if you learn to tie the Pitzen knot.  I can tie it with gloves on in about 12 seconds on average.

What is the difference between Pitzen and San Diego Jam knot? 

Can you tie a Pitzen loop knot, or course not.

Simple improved clinch knot ot Palomar knot is all that is needed for mono line.

Tom 

 

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Ideally you want to minimize any possibilities for failures in your setup. Also, leaving soft plastics especially when they have salt rigged on hooks for a long time is an easy way to rust out your hooks. 

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Palomar knot is easy to learn and tie directly on your hooks. 

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I tie everything direct and use an improved clinch knot most of the time. Its quick, reliable and I agree, less hardware is just more natural..I will use speed clips or Fast Tach clips for changing out Cranks and Hardbaits that do not have a split ring, or on Deeper cranks, I actually will tie a clip to the ring for extra noise since they can barely see the bait in stained water anyway.....I used to hate clips and never used them until I watched guys catch plenty of bass on hardbaits and it eliminates any issues with split rings and line getting frayed...In clear water I would still tie direct, but I rarely see more than a few feet of visibility at most.

 

Small swivels are not a bad thing, Actually like them cause I trust the knot better than line to line if just throwing a weightless fluke etc..Plus eliminates line twist. You can use them, especially if you don't trust your braid to leader knot etc...I tend to have that knot fail at times for not checking it often enough and if it frays it sucks to lose a fish and see the leader broke, so I am not anti swivel...I think they help at times, adds a bit of flash.

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20 hours ago, @reelChris said:

I grew up salt water fishing using a snap swivel at the end of my rod and pre-tied rigs for natural bait that terminated in a tied loop so that they could be quickly changed.  Last year I rigged up most of my plastics the same way - using mono with a hook on one end, and a loop tied on the other so I could quickly change rigs with other bait types, colors or techniques.  I've tried attaching the pre-rigged plastics using a snap swivel at the end of my main line, and directly tying main line to the rig end loop and had plenty of hangups without ever breaking at the attachment point between the main line and plastic rig.  However, no one else I've seen freshwater fishing does this, which leads me to the question - why not?  

I bet you caught fish, too.  If it is strong enough for salt, a Bass ain't gonna break it.

 

I don't use many snaps because I have trouble opening them with arthritic hands. Tying is easier for me.

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21 hours ago, Choporoz said:

Two likely reasons:

1.  Super smart bass can see the extra line, snaps, swivels and stuff and avoid your lure.

2.  Extra 'stuff' can change, even detract, from the 'action' of your lure.

 

20 hours ago, Glaucus said:

This.

 

You want to present the lure to the bass in the best way possible, from as natural looking as possible to the best action possible.

 

20 hours ago, Jig Man said:

The more stuff you have between your bait and the main line the more likely you are to have something that will fail and maybe cost you the fish of a lifetime.

 

20 hours ago, Jigfishn10 said:

I would think that the more you have between the hook and main line would take away from not only the feel of what the bait is doing but any subtle pick-up/bite from a bass.

 

20 hours ago, RB 77 said:

More points of failure. Consistent knot tying is one the most crucial elements of fishing. It should be able to be done like second nature smoothly and seamlessly and not seen as a determent in any way. Practice makes perfect.

 

I agree. But sometimes, I use swivels. Mainly in the flapping wind conditions, because that for some reason with some baits it adds twist to my line when casting. The one or two twists every cast start to add up over a few hours. I just ordered 100 swivels last night.

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Only time i ever use a swivel is a carolina rig or using a double fluke setup. I never prerig anything. I adjust when i get to the water to the conditions on hand. A few times, i will crank motor with water intake jist below waterline, and let it idle then get tm out and rig up while trolling out past no wake bouys. 

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The knot strength thing I get, and I'll probably move to direct tying everything this year since I've acquired more rods.  However, with respect to salty baits rusting hooks, my experience is that it's not really a concern.  E.g. this assortment of Big bite, Zoom and Berkeley plastics were tied on last June and fished through October then stored until today with no rust showing on any of the hooks.  Two of the steel Eagle Claw weights did rust, however.

 

 

 

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I would guess there are not many weightless Senkos thrown for a salt water fish, I have never fished salt water.

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