Jump to content

From a yak & using a spinning reel - Setting the drag...??


Recommended Posts

Like the title says, what's the best way to set the drag. I tend to have it on the looser side and if needed I can palm the spool. The reason I ask this is that when I have a sizeable fish on, it'll tow my yak around. I'm think that the tow factors into the drag setting. Any thoughts on this?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rule of thumb I have heard is set your drag to 1/3 - 1/2 of the lb test of your line you are using.

 

I don't have a spring scale to check that, so I just set mine so it slips a bit when I load up the rod. I'd rather have it set a little light and slip a bit on a hard strike or a strong hook set than be breaking off my line or snapping rods on hooksets.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've read the same. I was curious as how drag setting factors in being that my yak is not in a fixed position (unless anchored). Maybe it has now impact on the setting when a bass takes a sudden run. In that case, the drag setting has more relevance.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Set the drag normally. If the kayak moves it’s the same as if the fish is taking drag. They have pressure on them but also some give.  I fish from a Tracker and bassraider and don’t have spot lock. Current, wind, the fish I never end up where I started. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super User

The logic behind drag set is shock loading.  Shock loading multiplies the load by 4 to 10 times.  

Proper drag set is 1/4 of your weakest link, leader test, line test, or rod max line rating.  

It's your defense from breaking off or breaking a rod.  

These were kayak catches last year, and all hauled the boat around.  

aEULbga.jpg

AGc4hb7.jpg

M2Yrkhn.jpg

Most people don't have a clue how big 2-3 lbs drag set actually is, because they've never measured it.  

Du8zmq5.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I suggest don't make it too technical - don't worry about formulas, settings relative to line weight etc... after all, realistically, how do we easily measure pounds of tension on the line for a given drag setting while out on the water?

 

I just give the line a few tugs before a cast, and adjust the drag to "seems about right for the target species." Seat of the pants measurement, with an emphasis on how much tension do I think needs to be there to properly set the hook. When settling on a setting this way, I just imagine the expected pull of the target species... roughly.

 

Second part is once you get a bite, simply be prepared to adjust the drag, in response to the actual bite you got. Slips way too fast? Tighten. Pulling the boat? Loosen. Key is to know instinctively (muscle memory) to quickly put your fingers on the drag adjustment and in which direction to turn it.

 

Think of drag setting as (once you hook a fish) constantly adjusting during the fight - not as "set and forget." The fish is going to put different amounts of tension on the line as you bring it in, depending on whether it's running slow, running fast, changing direction, etc. It's dynamic; your drag might need to be, too.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, bulldog1935 said:

The logic behind drag set is shock loading.  Shock loading multiplies the load by 4 to 10 times.  

Proper drag set is 1/4 of your weakest link, leader test, line test, or rod max line rating.  

It's your defense from breaking off or breaking a rod.  

These were kayak catches last year, and all hauled the boat around.  

aEULbga.jpg

AGc4hb7.jpg

M2Yrkhn.jpg

Most people don't have a clue how big 2-3 lbs drag set actually is, because they've never measured it.  

Du8zmq5.jpg

Is that a Chatillon scale I see?

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

One item I neglected to mention is that when a fish is taking too much line instead of tightening the drag I'll palm the spool to apply some braking force. Tightening the drag  on the spool might be a recipe for disaster for me. I will loosen the drag if need be when the fish is very close to my yak and still has lots of fight left.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super User

The purpose of drag set is to set it and use it. 

Set it at your bench, and take it fishing.  

That's how you catch big fish on light tackle.  

davSyc9.jpg

 

Fumbling with unknown drag is how you learn to make excuses for the fish you didn't land.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One habit that has carried over from my surfcasting days is that whenever I left the water, I backed off the drag (spinning reel) until it had no pressure. The belief was that if it was left tightened down, the washers would take a "set" and be less effective. I don't know if that still holds true now with more advanced materials used in drags today.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super User

I always set my drag by hand based on the pound test I am using. I don't set it any lighter for kayak fishing, although I will loosen it or tighten while fighting a fish if I have to.  I never push the drag all the way down.  The tightest I set my drag is with braid when I fish heavy vegetation. It almost all the way but not quite. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super User

I think you are trying to fix a problem you aren't having by worrying about this.  In very few cases does what you use in a kayak not follow the same as in a more conventional boat.  Do whatever you normally do and you will be fine.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do you really measure your drag?? I have always done this by feel and constantly change it depending on the situation. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super User
18 hours ago, bulldog1935 said:

The logic behind drag set is shock loading.  Shock loading multiplies the load by 4 to 10 times.  

Proper drag set is 1/4 of your weakest link, leader test, line test, or rod max line rating.  

It's your defense from breaking off or breaking a rod.  

These were kayak catches last year, and all hauled the boat around.  

aEULbga.jpg

AGc4hb7.jpg

M2Yrkhn.jpg

Most people don't have a clue how big 2-3 lbs drag set actually is, because they've never measured it.  

Du8zmq5.jpg

I also measure my results 

22"

28"

26"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I never used the movement of the kayak or boat as they are not instant motion. I have set my drag a lot with six packs 16.9oz bottles of water work also. I use a lot of light line. usually if I hang up its on Rock or big logs. so, breaking off is about only option unless kids accidentally fall in the water. Take a 4lb line one can is about 1lb 1/4 line weight. Hook it on swivel and set drag so you can slowly lift it of ground with the slightest bounce it should pull drag 6 and 8Lb I'll use 2 cans and 10lb i'll use 3 cans. I've pulled in 15lb cats on 4lb line. it's been a long time since I've had a fish break my line. The cat in the pic was brought in on 4lb line.

_part-2000000000016670_.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super User

Set the drag normally, no more than 25% the max recommended line strength of your rod and no more than 30% of the lightest line you are using between your mainline and leader, whichever is lower.

 

The fact that the kayak is moving doesn’t really change how many pounds of pressure the line has on it

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


  • Outboard Engine

    fishing forum

    fishing tackle

    fishing

    fishing

    fishing tackle

    fishing

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.