Jump to content
A-Jay

Night Bassing ~ A-Jay's Version

Recommended Posts

Very helpful and well written piece.  Thanks for taking the time to write it, you should submit it as an article to bassresource.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes! that was great, very insightful. I have never been night fishing, but the more i read on here the more i want to try it. Couple questions: are you keeping the red light headlamp on all the time? Or just turn it on as needed (tieing a lure, unhooking a fish etc)? Do fish roam more at night? Or are they just not as tight to that cover as they are during the day? 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, BassB8Caster said:

Yes! that was great, very insightful. I have never been night fishing, but the more i read on here the more i want to try it. Couple questions: are you keeping the red light headlamp on all the time? Or just turn it on as needed (tieing a lure, unhooking a fish etc)? Do fish roam more at night? Or are they just not as tight to that cover as they are during the day? 

Thanks - my head lamp use is for bait selection, knots, fish landing & hook removal and most importantly, to help me find & eat a midnight snack

:)

A-Jay

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good read.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good article A-Jay.

There isn't any debate on white light affecting humans night vision, we can see better with good lighting and it takes time to recover night blindness after seeing white in the dark.

My personal experience with tournament night fishing challenges the affect of white light on bass. Some very experienced night anglers use no light, some use extreme amount of lights to luminate the shoreline, while others use black light etc. All lighting combinations seem to work and have won tournaments. Bugs are drawn to white light and always a consideration where Mosqiuto's are a problem.

I have used a 25w 12cDC bulb  in a clip on shop lamp with big reflector to luminate the shoreline when casting crankbaits and caught a lot of good size bass. Also use a powerful bright underwater light used to float squid at the transum of my bass boat with good results, luminates the water about 30' around the boat with indirect light. Use a clip on LED hat light in total darkness for re tying and finding things in the dark. Tape a flash light onto the net handle to help net hot bass at night. All these things work, just experiment and come up with what works for you.

K.I.S. Is essential at night, keep it simple! Single hook weedless presentations catch bass at night and you will spend more time fishing, less time swearing. 

Follow A-Jays advice, be safe, slow down, make sure your running lights work and stay on when it's dark.

Tom

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't do a ton of fishing at night but I've also found that its a lot easier to get out there before it gets dark and then just stay out there until whenever.  I sometimes fish big bodies of water and recording a trail from the ramp is important on the GPS so that I can simply follow it on the way back in.   Organization in the boat is a lot more important too as he mentioned.  The summer boat traffic from recreational riff raff is usually less at night but on some bodies of water there are still crafts out there so don't think that you'll have the lake to yourself just because you decide to be out there at night instead.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sigh - I wish I could fish at night...my wife won't let me...she thinks I'll drown or the boogeyman will get me...;)  Maybe one of these days I'll get a "permission slip" to give it a try !

Great post Andy !  :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A question Andy. I know a lot of your "night-ops" were in your canoe. Were you running nav lights or at least a white mast/all-round/anchor light ??

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent, kudos.

29 minutes ago, Goose52 said:

Sigh - I wish I could fish at night...my wife won't let me...she thinks I'll drown or the boogeyman will get me...;)  Maybe one of these days I'll get a "permission slip" to give it a try !

Great post Andy !  :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Get a large life insurance policy.  Watch the wife's attitude change.

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great Info....Good read....You are so right about safety, I learned my lesson as a young kid when I went striped Bass Fishing at night with my Father and older Brother, and the Fog came in and you could not see 6" in front of your face...Lucky for me, My father was very savvy on the water, had a loran back then and he decided to find a Channel Marker and tie up to it since the Ferry would not crash into the marker but with huge swells he was afraid it could hit a boat not picked up on radar. Turns out the Ferry ended up hitting a boat that same evening, But Freshwater Lakes are just as dangerous as Montauk Point on Long Island. 

I would agree, Safety and being prepared, never go alone, and Fog is no joke at any time, neither are waves, if a storm starts coming, it can be hard to leave, but be safe, fish from shore, the bass will be hitting anywhere if they are active and that is why night fishing can be amazing....Find a spot that holds bait, and you can sit in one spot all night long and get wave after wave of new fish replenishing, you don't have to go find them, they find you...Not always, but when it happens it is the best fishing imo you can do even if fishing for Crappie or Catfish.

I fish at night in the summer more than during the day because I love top water fishing....It is great at Day, but it is awesome at night, and it is so much fun when you get one of those nights when you can throw anything and get bit on what seems like every cast since you get in a "Zone" at night that is completely different than during the day....Hard to explain but the anticipation of a strike can make a night with only 3 fish in 5 hours seem like a Fantastic night...

In Florida, I don't start going until June since the Gators are spawning when the Bass are, unless you know the lake really well and are in a big boat, I would stay away from lakes with lots of gators only because you can have issues with gators  in the spring if you make a decison based solely on catching more fish which is easy to do and realize how risky it was...I stay out of tall grass and never go under trees since you need to be aware of Snakes as well...Everything feeds and roams at night. 

Anyone use Glow baits at night? My buddy keeps telling me to try them, but I can't do it, I just feel it looks so un natural, am I missing out? I use the same dark colors we all use during the day....To me Green Pumpkin works as well as black, flash helps however.......At least imo...Add some glitter to a frog and watch it get slammed if Moon is shining....That is what the Phat Frog color "Color Me" is for....Night Fishing...

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Goose52 said:

A question Andy. I know a lot of your "night-ops" were in your canoe. Were you running nav lights or at least a white mast/all-round/anchor light ??

Great question Goose.   Yes, my night ops have all recently been in the Old Town.  Accordingly they are all on smaller bodies of water where I was The ONLY guy on the lake at night - and my Navigation light - is a white flashlight.

 On larger bodies of water now in the Pro-V, I'll run a 225 degree red/green combo light up front and the mandatory 135 degree white stern light while U/W.  While on the trolling motor and fishing off the bow, that white stern light is well behind and point aft - so that's good.

  State Regulations here require an all around (360 degree) white light when anchored or not under command (drifting).  Not good. 

So while fishing (and on the trolling motor) I'm calling that underway and will show the red/green running lights and the stern light.  So no blinding white light on a stick in my face.   

:ph34r:

A-Jay

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, Goose52 said:

Sigh - I wish I could fish at night...my wife won't let me...she thinks I'll drown or the boogeyman will get me...;)  Maybe one of these days I'll get a "permission slip" to give it a try !

Great post Andy !  :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Permission-Slip2-550x366.jpg

Here you go - now all you have to do is practice forging her signature and you're All Set !

:)

A-Jay

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great write up. I couldn't believe this part though:


When ~ A good way to start out fishing at night is to get out on the water before sunset and just stay out there.  This offers an angler the chance to acclimate to the Night as it falls.  Sort of like the opposite of getting to the lake before sunrise & waking up with the lake.   I did the sunset to night deal several times in the beginning but as my abilities & confidence grew I shifted gears.  I now prefer to arrive after dark.  There seems to be 90 minutes or so after actual sunset where the bite is pretty slow.  So I’ll arrive after that.  If the fishing’s good & I have the gas, I’ll stay for the grey & sunrise bite too.  If not, I bail.  



Must vary by lake. Complete opposite here. During the twilight hours around sunset the fish act like the water is caffeinated. A few hours later and they're gone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, Neil McCauley said:

Great write up. I couldn't believe this part though:
 



Must vary by lake. Complete opposite here. During the twilight hours around sunset the fish act like the water is caffeinated. A few hours later and they're gone.

 Though I may have done a poor job of explaining it but that's the period I'm referring to.

And a few hours after that - you might get your arm broke.

:ph34r::)

A-Jay

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I, too have found that different bodies of water have different activity periods. On some, the twilight is the trigger and on others, it is closer to an hour after all the natural light is gone.  I have found that in shallower bodies of water around here twilight is prime time and many of the deep quarries don't turn on until well after dark. 

I'm close enough to a major city to have the benefit of its lighting in all but the most remote pockets on the water, so headlamps and flashlights are rarely necessary.  I do keep a hand held spot light for emergency situations and illuminating the launch when approaching. Until one becomes familiar with night fishing their lake, though, portable lighting is your friend.

Nice job A-Jay

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So let me present this

001.JPG002.JPG

Lighting for safety:

I don't bass fish at night but I do walleye fish. LED deck lights look nice but more important allow me to see the perimeter of the deck clearly during low/no light conditions. Locker lights are nice for choosing tackle but a headlight is still necessary for tying knots. Amber doesn't attract bugs and its effects on night vision are minimal. Adjusting the brightness and or background color on the graphs is important as well.    

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, slonezp said:

So let me present this

001.JPG002.JPG

Lighting for safety:

I don't bass fish at night but I do walleye fish. LED deck lights look nice but more important allow me to see the perimeter of the deck clearly during low/no light conditions. Locker lights are nice for choosing tackle but a headlight is still necessary for tying knots. Amber doesn't attract bugs and its effects on night vision are minimal. Adjusting the brightness and or background color on the graphs is important as well.    

Very nice.

A-Jay

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Geez where to start! ;)

Lot of questions about lights so I'll start there.

I do not use red or green or any other colored light. What I use is a "cap light" that attaches to the bill of my ball cap. With attached to my cap it ain't shinning directly in my eyes. I don't know if it's me or what but I find it only takes 30 seconds to a minute for my eyes to adjust.

As for running lights

If I'm night fishing it's usually on Toledo Bend, both Texas & Louisiana require you to have stern lights on when no underway. Most guys never do because it attracts bugs! Because the lake is so large you can hear a boat coming miles away & when they are close enough we flip all lights on. Game Wardens are OK with this.

As for black lights or other lights for illuminating my line or the shoreline line I find the distracting. Case in point, my nephew, his friend, & I were night fishing out of his friend boat. It was equipped with black lights the reflected towards the shoreline. After 3-4 hours of beating up the shoreline we rounded a point into a cove. I heard a fish strike the surface behind us, I stepped to that side of the boat & fired a cast towards the sound. Result a nice 3# chunk! We were sitting in 8' fishing towards the lights & the bass were in 12' behind us!

The only other light I use is a Brinkmann Max Million III; 3,000,000 cp it will light up your world!

We do run WOT on Toledo at night ;)

10069789.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Question for us humans who do not fish as much at night as some of you veterans-

What do you do about the light from your graphs?  They are a necessity to finding offshore structure or just waypoints, but emit a ton of light!

Jeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Catt, What is WOT?

As for graphs, I turn down the brightness also, but I also tilt the displaly down. If I'm anchored, I'll turn it off.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, 00 mod said:

Question for us humans who do not fish as much at night as some of you veterans-

What do you do about the light from your graphs?  They are a necessity to finding offshore structure or just waypoints, but emit a ton of light!

Jeff

No not really & besides you can adjust the backlight settings!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×