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Fiberglass Cranking Sticks - What are your thoughts?

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I don't have a designated crankbait rod as of yet, but I am aware of the significant dichotomy surrounding their material.  Some people like fiberglass, some people say glass is too much like a wet noodle, and some like hybrid fiberglass and graphite.  What are all your thoughts on fiberglass and how it compares to graphite for cranking rods?  

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I prefer a moderate taper, graphite rod for cranking.  The rod is lighter, and more sensitive than fiberglass, and the deflection behavior of the bait, when using mono, copoly, or fluoro is virtually the same.  That gain in sensitivity helps me guide the bait through cover, like weeds, fallen timber, dock posts, etc. without hanging up or fouling the hooks with weeds.  I can also discern how hard the bottom is, when making contact.

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I have composite cranking rods as well as a few that are all graphite.  But the actions of each rod are the same......moderate.  The action doesn't wear you out after fishing cranks all day ans allows the bait to stay hooked in the fishes mouth by absorbing some of the shock when the fish runs.  Is there a difference between the graphite and the composites, not one I can really tell although the graphite rods tend to be a smaller dia opposed to the composites.  Either way the "wet noode" you speak of is the moderate action of a technique specific cranking rod.

Just now, gulfcaptain said:

I have composite cranking rods as well as a few that are all graphite.  But the actions of each rod are the same......moderate.  The action doesn't wear you out after fishing cranks all day ans allows the bait to stay hooked in the fishes mouth by absorbing some of the shock when the fish runs.  Is there a difference between the graphite and the composites, not one I can really tell although the graphite rods tend to be a smaller dia opposed to the composites.  Either way the "wet noode" you speak of is the moderate action of a technique specific cranking rod.  As for fiberglass, they will be a bit heavier and less sensitive which some like as it gives the fish a second longer to eat the crankbait before the angler detects the bit.  This helps some who "swing" the moment they feel a bite opposed to reeling through the bite when using cranks.

 

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My personal favorite Crankbait rod is actually a 12 ft Fly rod used for Tarpon ~

It's also especially proficient for use as a drop shot rig when using a Banjo minnow tipped with a 20 inch Jelly worm.

Good Luck.

:unsure:

A-Jay

 

 

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When I was in the same position as you I had called St. Croix customer service to pick their brain on the subject before I ordered one. The guy I talked to up thought graphite was a better option hands down. Lighter, more sensitive, same action, etc. etc. Although I didn't go against his recommendation and try a glass rod, and still haven't tried one I'm 100% satisfied with graphite cranking rods. 

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Crankbait rod design has come a long way in the last eight to ten years.  Where there was few options to obtain a softer moderate action other than a quality E-Glass, composite and all graphite blanks have achieved those actions while enhancing sensitivity and reducing weights. I fish with both composite (2) and all graphite (4) at this point.  An all glass rod need not be a " wet noddle " and the Lamiglas SR705R is a good example of that. Personal preference really plays a large role in what selection you might make.

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1 hour ago, J Francho said:

I prefer a moderate taper, graphite rod for cranking.  The rod is lighter, and more sensitive than fiberglass, and the deflection behavior of the bait, when using mono, copoly, or fluoro is virtually the same.  That gain in sensitivity helps me guide the bait through cover, like weeds, fallen timber, dock posts, etc. without hanging up or fouling the hooks with weeds.  I can also discern how hard the bottom is, when making contact.

Ditto - I've tried all three "mixes" (all glass, high end graphites and composites), and for me, I much prefer some graphite in the mix. Doesn't have to be high end, either. The old IM6 or 96% graphite rods (composites?) from "back in the day" performed just as well. Just get a "moderate" or parabolic action rod. Just never could find an all glass rod I was happy with for this application.

-T9 

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Just now, Team9nine said:

Just never could find an all glass rod I was happy with for this application.

Ditto that, too.

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I have champion CB glass, and graphite, some older and newer  Crucials. For me a CB rod needs to have some glass In it. I love glass, going to try some tatulas and Powell though if they go on sale in upcoming weeks! 

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I really like the Academy Ethos Composite Cranking rod. It is an exceptional rod for less than $75.00 & many times less than that when on sale.

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This is one of those personal preference things.  I have all 3 varieties of cranking rods and use all 3 for different things.  I am very much a fan of glass and composite rods but there are some baits/scenarios where I prefer graphite.  The glass rods I've owned and fished are sensitive enough to distinguish between rock and mud and aren't as heavy as people make them out to be.  For me, glass rods are just plain fun to fish.  

All that said, it's completely personal preference.  You will have to spend some time fishing with both to really decide what you like.

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My 1st dedicated crankbait rod was made using a Fenwick salt water popping rod back in the early 70's and it was a lightvweight fiberglass 7' rod. Caught a few thousand crankbait bass on this rod over 30 years and finally retired it for a Lamglas custom crankbait rod blank same as the SR 705R before it was yellow. The SR705R is a Eglass composite blank, lighter and stronger than most glass rods. My second crankbait rod used for smaller medium diving and lipless lures is a Loomis PR845C GL2, another popping rod made from composite glass/graphite blend that is also my go to structure spoon rod.

For me it's all about ease of casting long distance using crankbaits and feeling lure vibrations to detect strike, moderate action helps to keep the hooks from tearing out near the boat.

See related thread Deep Cranking set up,  9 Nov.

Tom

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The only glass rod I have nowawadays is a medium heavy moderate for Square-bills.  The river I mostly fish here has a lot of wood cover and I find myself getting caught up wayyyy less because of its forgiveness.  

 

I find I don't have to spend as much time being careful when cranking that type of cover if that makes sense.  With the glass rod, I can just keep reeling and the lure will naturally deflect better then when I used a composite or graphite rod.  It's probably more mental since I can just keep reeling with glass whereas with graphite I feel every Tick and nudge and tend to drive the lure into the wood more. 

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Huge fan of fiberglass crankbait rods.  I have a Phenix XG3 I use for heavier cranks, and a Orochi Swingfire for medium cranks.  The best benefit for me is how effortlessly you can recast your crankbait over and over again without getting fatigued or irritating your wrists/elbows/shoulders.  The moderate action lets you lift the crank out of the water, whip it back, around, and out, like a slingshot.

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I have been running the BPS Crankin' Stick for the last 4 years, and I love it. I don't throw deep cranks, but I throw shallow cranks, square bills, wake baits, jerk baits and traps on them for the most part, and have been using them lately with spinnerbaits as well. I used to use glass rods, but found that I prefer the glass/carbon hybrids better for my usage. 

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Fiberglass has very little feel but keeps a fish pinned like no other. 

I throw square bills and up to an XD6 on my 7'8" M/M glass and anything bigger than that on a Crankenstein. 

I like this combo and don't see myself changing it.

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On 11/17/2016 at 3:20 PM, Team9nine said:

Just never could find an all glass rod I was happy with for this application.

-T9 

Have you found one you're happy with for ANY application?

 

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Take a look at the new St Croix glass rods before dismissing all glass rods. 

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On 11/17/2016 at 4:17 PM, Columbia Craw said:

Crankbait rod design has come a long way in the last eight to ten years.  Where there was few options to obtain a softer moderate action other than a quality E-Glass, composite and all graphite blanks have achieved those actions while enhancing sensitivity and reducing weights. I fish with both composite (2) and all graphite (4) at this point.  An all glass rod need not be a " wet noddle " and the Lamiglas SR705R is a good example of that. Personal preference really plays a large role in what selection you might make.

The sr705 is my favorite. All glass rods can't be lumped together any more than all graphite rods. 

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I probably wouldn't have a problem using a glass rod for some techniques but I'd still choose graphite first for everything.  I could probably get away with glass for spinnerbaits, maybe even jerkbaits and some deep cranking situations but I would not give up graphite on my shallow crankers, no way. 

I grew up at a time when glass rods were all there were and I full remember my first Lightning Rod experience and sensitivity was WAY improved over my glass rods.  Huge difference.

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8 hours ago, Jeff H said:

Have you found one you're happy with for ANY application?

 

I haven't, but that's just me. I've tried them (all glass) for buzzbaits, spinnerbaits, square bills, Traps and deep cranking. I just prefer a little bit of stiffness and responsiveness in my rods. The closest I've found that I liked was the old red Tour KVD crankbait rods that were a composite blank blend of E-Glass and carbon and that had that parabolic glass action, or fairly close to it. The old Daiwa VIPs were pretty close, also.

-T9 

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I really love an old school glass rod for cranks and topwaters except for frogs. I broke both of mine after about 10 plus years of use. I use composite rods of both glass and graphite in medium or medium heavy powers. I can say that the more expensive composite rods are more sensitive and lighter than glass rods that run under $80. My current crank rods are two BPS 7' Crankin Sticks, one in Medium and the other in Medium heavy. My other two are a halo MH 7'11" crank rod, and a Veritas Winch 7' Medium model for topwaters and buzzbaits in sparse cover. All four are great rods, the Veritas probably the best of  the four.

 

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Check the new Kistler Rods Feel-N-Reel series. They are on sale now. You can PM for a discount code. It's a new type of composites rod. I really like them.

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