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thinkingredneck

color or shape theory?

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I am sorting my tackle and discovered that I have 11 different worm types in June bug color.  I have a lot of faith in the color and got almost every worm shape I could find.  When I first started, an old man at church told me June Bug was THE color.  So I figured, in my simple minded way, that all I had to do was figure out the shape they wanted that day.  I am not sure if this makes me a color freak, or if it means color doesn't matter to me.  Does anyone else employ this strategy?

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To me color is the absolute last consideration I make when deciding on which plastic to throw. 

That said I use Junebug more than any other because in my waters it's proven itself and I have confidence in it. 

 

There are waters that a translucent color will be predominant, or one with sparkles, or a solid lighter color like pumpkin or even black. 

The point is you don't need a rainbow in your bag, but sometimes contrast or a complete change up will be needed. 

Same thinking as useing a white skirted spinnerbait over a chartreuse one. 

 

The fish will tell you what they want and sometimes they'll want something you don't have. 

 

 

 

Mike

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to me ,I want the profile, presentation, speed and depth right first. color comes last. now having said that I do have certain colors that I have faith in. june bug and black and blue in stained/ dirty water, green pumpkin in less stained to semi clear, watermelon/ translucent colors in clear water. for me you need a general color that is visible in the water your fishing but not overpowering and generally matches the prey where your fishing. im sure there are others with more experience who will say color matters more but just for me I feel the other factors are more important. you can have the best color there is but if your not fishing where the fish are and with a presentation that they are receptive to you wont catch many fish.

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In order:

Depth

Action and retrieve speed

Profile

Color

 

:fishing-026:

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I think color has a lot to do with catching or not. Junebug and Green Pumpkin are my two best colors. Like the others said depth and speed has a lot to do with it. Don't forget a 8" Junebug lizard when you fish at the Rez in the spring. ;)

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I often use the first plastic I pull out of the bag .  

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Having confidence in a color is #1 in my book, if I aint confident in it I aint throwing it!

 

Odd as it may sound I aint never caught a bass on green pumpkin so I no longer own any.

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19 minutes ago, Catt said:

Having confidence in a color is #1 in my book, if I aint confident in it I aint throwing it!

 

Odd as it may sound I aint never caught a bass on green pumpkin so I no longer own any.

I have found that I rarely catch a fish on a lure or color I never fish.  Sometimes color

is critical, but not always. For example, black jig/ black & blue trailer was my go-to for

years. Then one day a friend of mine said PBJ was killer for him and I have had great

luck with this combination for the last couple of years. Last summer I went to a green

pumpkin with a little blue (Kent's Kraw) and that's all I'm throwing for now. So, how

important is "color".  As Catt implied, it's all about confidence.

 

http://www.siebertoutdoors.com/Grid-Iron-Brush-Jig-470.htm

 

 

:fishing-026:

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When I first started using worms the black grape Jelly worm was what I used close to 100 percent of the time . My fishing buddy used blue . I dont think there was ever a day where the bass hit one and not the other . A color I havent seen for years is lime green . Fliptail had that color and the bass around here went through them by the bagfuls . About the only color I wont use is anything with a red fire tail.  Bluegills constantly hit that tail .

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My confidence colors are junebug, junebug red, red bug, black and blue, green pumpkin, breaking bream, white, sprayed or candy grass and watermelon red. I have some of those colors in many different shapes that I have confidence in. Some of them more confidence than others. Sometimes it takes a while to find the particular combination of color and shape they want. Sometimes they don't want what I have at all. I do plan on expanding that confidence to more colors and/or shapes this year. It would be nice to have something in my arsenal that will aid in catching them every outing. 

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Yeah, I usually T rig, weightless  to 3/8 0z, and start with a Trickworm. I have Anacondas, Ol Monsters, U Vibe, U tale, Fat Max, etc.  Try to find something they want.

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I feel like color makes a difference for me. Especially when I fish plastics. I fish lots of really clear waters in Wi, and it seems like I do best on certain colors at certain times of year. Mind you, they're only small differences. 

▪Early spring- green pumpkin with some chartreuse 

▪Prespawn- pbj 

▪Spawn- green pumpkin orange or gold.

▪Then throughout the rest of the year green pumpkin blue or pbj are good bets.

 

Now that doesn't mean other colors don't work, but those catch constantly. Plus, I have loads of confidence in them.

 

I've also seen tons of small crayfish in the river and they're literally green pumpkin blue... so that sort of makes sense why that's my best color!

 

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I agree that confidence is essential with whatever you fish but you only get confident by catching bass. Everything being equal like you know the depth, the bass activity level and the speed/ cadence, lure size, color can be very critical and the key factor.

When fishing with a partner the 1st questions we ask each other is "how deep and what color", we know what each other is using.

When fishing alone and catch a bass I will change colors to determine what is may be working better. Color is important where I fish and try to use something the bass haven't seen.

Tom

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I can't even think of 11 different types of worms? I pretty much stick to straight tail or swimming tail worms and a handful of colors. 

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I can think of multiple times when color mattered more than shape/action. And vice versa. When me and my tourney partner are fishing the only time we are throwing the same platic is once we establish a good pattern. And still usually I'm throwing it with a heavier weight making short precise pitches and underhand casts while he is making regular casts, soaking the bait a bit more. Until we really pin point what they want

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For me it's more presentation than anything. But that being said most lures I own are either a green, brown, black, or white base color and then small differences between them like sparkles, shades, etc...unless the fishing is really slow will I mess around with different colors, or if I'm just bored. If it's a high pressured lake I go towards more variations within colors as I feel every bass at a lake I fish weekly tournaments at has seen a watermelon or a green pumpkin, so I throw a green pumpkin purple flake or red flake, or a darker watermelon with candy flakes. For me it works. But Brown and green colors have never failed me and probably never will. Bass will eat oddly colored things, but i just think more natural is the way to go when it comes to color in plastics

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About the only time I worry about color is when I am fishing water that is shallow and very clear. 

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Largemouth bass are not my normal pursuit. I'm a smallmouth guy first and foremost so that, I'm sure that influences my decisions. Color and shape are the LAST two things I think about when deciding on what to throw. Location and which presentation will work in that location determines what I throw. Where I fish, once I find them, it doesn't seem to matter which shape or color plastic I use. The way I see it, there are dozens of different colors for me to choose from. If the fish were keying on a certain color, the odds on me choosing the exact right color on the first try or even the second, are very slim. Same thing on the shape. I catch too many fish to think that I have some sixth sense that helps me choose the right color. I don't even use the color picking reasoning that seems to be common with many of the experienced anglers here. Maybe I'm just lucky, but I believe that in most cases, for what I'm doing, color just isn't an important factor.

Another thing that reinforces my beliefs is that I am in contact with several other good fishermen who also chase smallmouth. Lure color discussions are almost non-existant. Everybody uses different lures and get similar results. Guys who are catching are getting them because they are good at locating them, not because they are good at picking colors.

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