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10ft Jon Boat - Ability to Cast/Work Presentations While Standing?

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Hi all, this is my first post in the boating area. 

 

I'm in a situation where I want to fish around the inlet & first (small) creek of my reservoir this early Spring. The reservoir itself is about 4500 surface acres but I have zero intention of being out over the main body of the lake. The small area I want to work is a very productive area in the Spring. 

 

The purpose of this thread is to gauge what the community feels about the general stability of casting and working presentations (jerkbait, jigging, etc) from a standing position on something like a 10ft Jon Boat? 

 

I can't imagine myself trying to work a jerkbait, for example, from a sitting position. Or really any other kind of presentation from a sitting position for that matter. Sitting (in my mind) = trolling, and that's not something I'm really interested in. Casting/targeting fish in cover & structure is my idea of fishing

 

I have seen some youtube vids where a guy has an almost identical setup that I'm thinking about putting together (10 ft jon, electric trolling motor) and he seems to do fine standing/casting.

 

But then I read some comments about setups like this "looking tippy" or unstable. Some folks reply saying they may feel "tippy" but actually aren't. As I've never been in a jon boat on the water I have no clue how I would feel inside of it or what it's limitations are. 

 

For reference, here's a vid (5 min) where this guy lands like a 10+lb LMB in a 10ft jon boat ... he appears to be quite comfortable standing/casting/setting the hook/working her in/etc. 

 

https://youtu.be/n__9ZVCHTps

 

 

Other Considerations: 

-I currently have just about everything needed to ADD to a jon boat: trolling motor, deep cycle marine battery, minn kota trolling center, small fish finder, oars, life jacket, anchors (some pictured below). The trolling motor is a 45lb Thrust Endura Max. I've got about $600 into these items already so I'm definitely looking to get some use out of them this Spring. 

-My truck is 2000 Chevy S10, so not a huge bed with which to haul. 

 

Can anyone with experience with these types of jon boat setups speak to their general stability and the types of presentations/applications they're comfortable using them in? 

 

ntOqvp1.jpg

 

I'd be looking at something like the below, though I would very much like to find a used one in good shape on CL or something:

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i had a 12 foot boat similar to that. a 36 inch bottom is fairly narrow.

You would be able to stand , but I would stay down on the floor.

Generally you need at least a 48 inch wide bottom to be able to comfortably fish from a deck.

It all depends on how well you can distribute your weight.

I have a Kayak that is built for standing, but it gets tippy if I am not careful.

the more weight you put in the boat the less stable it becomes.

with a max weight capacity, of 380 lbs.,it will get tippy if you have much gear with you.

 

 

 

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Are you looking to put it in the bed of a truck? Is trailering and option?

 

I had a 10ft Basshound plastic boat that I built a casting deck on and I was pretty comfortable on it in up to 12-15 mph winds depending on the size of the reservoir. 

 

It was extremely stable.

 

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26 minutes ago, Dirtyeggroll said:

Are you looking to put it in the bed of a truck? Is trailering and option?

Nice setup - Yes, needs to go in the bed of a small pickup (S10). Per the regulations, anything trailered must launch from the marina, which is too far away from the small area of the reservoir where use is intended. I need to be able to hand launch it (keeping weight down) in the area it'll be used. 

 

I've seen some vids about building decks on these (much like the one pictured) ... it's most definitely nice to have that feature but I don't think it's a must in my situation.

 

Given how little shoreline is accessible where I want to use this, simply being able to maneuver around the area while presenting from a standing position is an enormous advantage as-is.

 

I'm looking to balance: 

1) Safety

2) The ability to hand launch in a specific area and

3) The ability to cast/present lures from a standing position

 

So to be clear, I'd be looking to cast from within the boat - not from a deck. 

 

Is it possible to clarify whether or not a flat bottom jon boat is more stable than any kind of mod V jon boat (from the perspective of standing up in it)? 

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I know you seem interested in an aluminum model, and by all means get what you want, but it’s hard to beat the Pelican / Bass Hunter / BassBaby style plastic hull boats for small boat stability. That’s because this style has pontoons underneath which offer great stability in a small boat. If you are open to this just scroll thru the Pelican thread in this forum and eyeball what some of these can provide.

 

For myself i’m partial to the BassBaby and haved owned one for years and absolutely LOVE fishing out of it. It has built in wheels, so you can pull it out the bed of your truck and easily wheel it to launch anywhere you want. I leave all my junk in mine including battery and foot controlled trolling motor and it is still not bad to get in/out of the truck. I stand in mine a good bit but find the sitting position also good for casting.

 

good luck!

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I’d recommend a plastic boat like a bass raider or pond Prowler. Those are 48” wide and are a lot more stable than a 36” wide Jon boat. I had a 1436 Jon boat before I got my pond Prowler and I had a hard time standing and fishing in it. I can stand and fish all day in my pond Prowler 

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Wear your PFD!

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LonnieP makes a good point. 

I was going back and forth between getting the Bass Raider or a 10 Foot John boat. The fact that the Bass Raider has almost twice the weight capacity is what made up my mind to get It over the John Boat. 

 

 The only down side I have seen is the John Boat is quite a bit lighter. 

My fiancée and I have had ours in 4-5 foot white caps and the little guy took it like a champ. Sure we got wet and the center floor was filled with water but it stayed afloat very well.  

 

 Many people have built built casting decks on the front of Bass Raiders. You owe it to yourself to look through the long thread on them on this forum and check them out. 

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IMG-0082.jpgI built a set of outriggers for my canoe so I could stand and fish. Super stable due to the added width, fits easily into my truck and can be rigged in minutes. There are ways to make almost anything work as a stable fishing platform.  What I did notice in the video posted was the guy generally stayed central and did not have a deck.  He also made sure to sit anytime he went to lean over to land a fish.  A 1036 would work if you are careful about weight position and mindful about how you move about.

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Man I hope you're not going to spend $700+ on a 10' johnboat with no trailer or motor? I was just looking at a 15' flatbottom with a 25hp mercury and a trolling motor on a trailer for 1,200 on FB marketplace.

 

I've fished out of a 10' Tracker topper. I consider myself to be have pretty good balance, but standing and fishing wasn't the most comfortable thing. If I'd been on a lake with waves or stumps instead of a tiny pond, there's no way I would have been standing. Putting a raised seat in one and fishing from that would be how I'd go about it instead if it was going to be my primary fishing boat. 

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With small boats bottom width is the key to stability!

 

Your 10' Jon has a 36" bottom width, most "plastic" boats have a 48"+ bottom width.

 

Can it be done comfortably?

 

Absolutely!

 

I fished/hunted out of pirogues (24" bottom) for years!

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I had a Bass Hunter and alone, I could stand but I found that I was more comfortable learning how to cast and work baits from the seated position.  In my Ranger I can't fish sitting down......at all.  It just doesn't feel right.  I tried it when I injured my knee and just could never get used to it.  In the Bass Hunter, it was like second nature.  Put 2 people in that boat though and I guarantee you will be sitting down.  

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One popular YouTube angler, Cornell, fishes almost exclusively out of a mini bass boat, even has a video on its characteristics you can watch. He stands the whole time, occasionally has a companion angler on the vessel with him, both standing, no issue.

 

Yes, it is about width, for sure, but also length. My Meyers Sportspal S-15 is a little over 15 feet long, I think 43" wide if the boat collars are added (they call them sponsons). My nephew and I can both stand and fish at the same time. And, Carl on another YouTube channel does the same with the smaller S-13, that is two anglers standing at the same time.

 

Advantage? The 13 footer only weighs 57 lbs., can be carried overhead by, say, a woman for some distance to the water if that is ever an issue. The square stern models, S-13 and S-15, are factory ready for either trolling motors or small outboards. This provides super flexibility: paddle, TM or gas power.

 

I typically stand and fish, like to paddle my S-15 around standing using a 280 cm double-bladed paddle that works great standing and seated, too.

 

I'd go mini bass boat over jon boat, plenty for sale used at all times. I'd go Meyers Sportspal over any other canoe as it is the best fishing canoe of them all. I'd recommend it to anyone needing great flexibility: carrying issues, slow rivers, ponds and lakes, easy toting on a car top or truck.

 

I attached the S-13 below.

 

Brad

 

 

Sportspal S13.JPG

By the way, Cornell's YouTube vids are great. Here is one to get you to his page.  Brad

 

Mini Bass Boat Angler

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My fried took me to a pond a while back and we fished from his 10' jon. he had a floor in the bottom between the benches and seats on each bench. He sat in the back and used his tiller trolling motor to move the boat backwards all day. I had never fished with anybody who did that, but it worked just fine. And you could stand if you needed, but we didn't.

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Thanks for the responses guys I'm starting to see this in a new light ... greater width for greater stability - seems like the consensus is there's a substantial difference in stability between 36" and 48" - I've been looking at the specs of something like a Pond Prowler.

 

2 hours ago, the reel ess said:

And you could stand if you needed, but we didn't.

 

3 hours ago, TOXIC said:

I had a Bass Hunter and alone, I could stand but I found that I was more comfortable learning how to cast and work baits from the seated position.

 

14 hours ago, wasabi_VA said:

I stand in mine a good bit but find the sitting position also good for casting.

 

Can I get some quick clarification from those who basically said that they are able to stand but either learned or preferred how to present to the fish from a sitting position?

 

What presentations are you referring to? 

 

Fishing from shore the last couple years (this last year pretty hardcore) I can't even begin to imagine any kind of presentation from a sitting position inside a small, deckless craft ... am I missing something? 

 

Jerkbaiting comes to mind as a good example ... can anyone say they effectively worked a jerkbait from a sitting position? 

 

My primary use for this will be in the early Spring to mid-Spring (water temps ranging low 40s to around 50° - hence jerkbaiting) around the inlet and first small creek channel of the reservoir.

 

The shoreline in this area is a joke - that is, you can cover maybe 5% of the water in this area via shore. It isn't a lot of water overall (a pond's worth), but the structure of this canyon reservoir makes covering that water from shore extremely difficult if not impossible. Hence why I'm seeking a portable, stable, standing-while-casting vessel that can be unloaded on the spot from my 6ft bed truck. 

 

10 hours ago, Bluebasser86 said:

Man I hope you're not going to spend $700+ on a 10' johnboat with no trailer or motor? I was just looking at a 15' flatbottom with a 25hp mercury and a trolling motor on a trailer for 1,200 on FB marketplace.

Yea - It's not ideal at all. I hope to be able to find something used in great condition while I'm educating myself on watercraft in the interim. Part of my motivation here for the smaller craft is that I already own about $600.00 worth of everything necessary to put onto a smaller, portable craft (trolling motor, battery, small fish finder, oars, PFD, etc - all brand new). I'm just lacking the vessel itself. 

 

Out of curiosity, is this FB marketplace you're referencing a local thing or...? I check CL on the reg and I'm going to start checking the local paper as well. I'm wondering if the good-old newspaper doesn't get overlooked sometimes given the prevalence of CL. 

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In my case, with my 8' BassBaby, I do both sitting and standing. I am predominantly a crappie fishermen so many of my presentation methods allow me to relax and sit and just watch my rods (bobbers, suspended jigs, trolling, etc). Other times I'm actively casting jigs. I think I've gotten 'calibrated' to sitting and probably do most of my casting sitting now, but occasionally I'll still stand if I feel like that will help.

 

My decision to sit or stand isn't a function of boat stability though. This little boat is so stable that I do whatever feels most natural to work the rod.

 

One reason might be that I was previously using a kayak, and I was never really comfortable casting from such a low seating position. Switching to the BassBaby, where I sit with a single seat in the middle, makes me feel like I am sitting upright and with a good angle to cast accurately as well as watch my line and fight any fish I catch.

 

How close to the water can you unload your boat?

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1 hour ago, TotalNoob said:

 I can't even begin to imagine any kind of presentation from a sitting position inside a small, deckless craft ... am I missing something? 

 

Ruptured 3 disc in my lower back, torn ligaments in my lower back, arthritis, bone spurs, calcium deposits, & other ailments.

 

You learn to adapt & overcome or quit fishing 😉

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I've fished standing in my lowe  1032 for 25 years. I can pretty much do any style of fishing and while I don't jerkbait much its 1 technique that I have have a problem with in that I tend to thwack my rod against the side of the boat when working it. Also I do try to avoid winds over 15 mph but once it gets over 25 it can be dangerous. Only thing I can think to add is putting anything wider than a 1032 in an s10 Wil be a tight squeeze at best. Depends on where the wheelwells line up. I put mine in my colorado but it's a 4door if it wasn't the boat wouldn't go in flat. Something I didn't think about when I bought the truck as I took it for granted with my Sierra and scottsdale. One last thing ill add is I've fished from my buddies bass Hunter style and I feel that  an aluminum jon has room for more gear 1 or 2 people.

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For about the first 5 years of fishing from a kayak, I sat down for all presentations. It was not a kayak you could stand up on. About the only presentation I feel I'd need to stand for is pitching, but I learned to do it sidearmed. I do like to stand during the spawn though.

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I've seen two men go overboard from jon boats...both 10ft...very tippy...

 

good fishing... 

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After watching several youtube vids and absorbing the info in this thread I'm starting to lean toward the "plastic" pontoon-style boats due to their stability. 

 

It looks like they're all made of some kind or other "UV-stabilized Fortiflex® high-density polyethylene" which doesn't really mean anything to me. Can anyone speak to their real-world durability?

 

While going through reviews, I learned that the Bass Baby is apparently made out of one single piece of material. BPS says the below about the Pond Prowler when asked if it is a one-piece construction:

 

the Bass Pro Shops Uncle Bucks Pond Prowler II Fishing Boat SKU: 2451000 is not a piece.

There is a deck and a hull stapled together with putty in-between. Then we put the rub rail on with rivets.

 

Does one-piece construction play an important role in it's longevity?

 

3 hours ago, wasabi_VA said:

How close to the water can you unload your boat?

10-20 yds at the closest likely - water level will be higher in the Spring which is when this will really be useful. The terrain it would go over is unfriendly - rock, shale ... she'd get scratched up for sure. 

 

I looked at the Bass Buddy - review and stability test: 

 

  

Seems pretty impressive (albeit a little tight) though this guy admits he received a discount on the price of the boat in exchange for unbiased opinion. Built-in wheel system does look quite handy for one person. I do wonder about the durability of that. 

 

 

 

9 hours ago, Brad Reid said:

One popular YouTube angler, Cornell, fishes almost exclusively out of a mini bass boat, even has a video on its characteristics you can watch. He stands the whole time, occasionally has a companion angler on the vessel with him, both standing, no issue.

Thanks for this link. I watched him fish out of it and also found his review video that you mentioned (below). It's a Pelican Bass Raider 10E and he's fishing out of it the way I imagine fishing out of a boat on the water. Looks like he's had a lot of practice, he seems very comfortable. 

 

 

 

Dick's carries these Pelican Bass Raiders but not around here they don't. I looked online and it shows that no Dick's store within a 50 mile radius carries these (nor will even "ship to store"). 


There is a BPS about 60 miles away and they carry the Pond Prowler. I found this little review below. 

 

 

 

This guy shows the 10ft boat in the bed of his truck, looks like it's wide enough to fit between the wheel wells. 

 

I went and measured the width between the wheel wells on my S10 as 36". So it looks like I'd have to ride something like this above the wheel wells it seems, or at an angle within the bed?

 

Does anyone who owns a small truck and one of these types of boats have a solid system of loading and securing the boat? It looks like even the 8ft Bass Baby has a 48" width between the two pontoons underneath. 

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Dang, that sucks a BassBaby won't fit between the wheel wells of your truck. I have a full size and it fits fine. The wider minitoon models will be more stable, but even the narrower ones that fit within an S10 will be more stable than a similar aluminum 10' jonboat just because of their pontoon style bottom.

 

My BassBaby is durable as heck. It's thick plastic, durable, heavy duty. I've had it for 10 years and it has held up to both general age as well as usage. I take care of it but don't necessarily baby it. No seams or anything has failed. Even those wheels and their mounting mechanism has been good for 10 years. I friggin love the ability to roll this thing to the water's edge rather than dragging it, and it helps me get it out easier when I have to get it up a small hill from a pond.

 

Earlier I said I can easily put it in the back of the truck, which is still true. And it's just like the guy in that video says - throw it in there and just use one quick strap. In and out fast. That said, I'm in my early 50's and trying to go easy on my neck and back so I am building a Harbor Freight 4'x8' utility trailer that you can get for $260 with a coupon. A lot of guys use these for 'yaks and small boats over a traditional boat trailer, plus you also have a utility trailer for other junk like firewood or your riding lawnmower when needed. I already assembled it so know it's going to work beautifully for me. I only mention this to give you another option - using a small trailer like this - in case you want to consider it based upon the boat models you are evaluating. You can google this trailer and finds tons of forums and videos about how guys use them for boats, bikes, 'yaks, etc. Lifting into the back of my full size truck was starting to worry me as I get older and weaker (yep, getting old sucks) but this trailer is gonna be a delight to use in lieu of doing that.

 

 

Edit - let me add that it isn't the boat itself that is starting to get heavy (for me) to load into the bed of my truck. It's the fact that I keep EVERYTHING inside the boat even when loading/unloading because ordinarily it makes it super easy an fast to load up and go when burning daylight. Also makes it easy to unload. Sure, I could remove my trolling motor and series 27 battery and assorted tackle but that stuff is clamped in/bolted down and I just never needed to do it. And since I still want that quick departure I'd rather switch to using this little flatbed trailer and still leaving everything in the boar rather than load/unload every trip. Now I can just leave the full boat on the trailer and take the same minute or two to connect it to my tow hitch and go.

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28 minutes ago, wasabi_VA said:

My BassBaby is durable as heck. It's thick plastic, durable, heavy duty. I've had it for 10 years and it has held up to both general age as well as usage. I take care of it but don't necessarily baby it. No seams or anything has failed. Even those wheels and their mounting mechanism has been good for 10 years. I friggin love the ability to roll this thing to the water's edge rather than dragging it, and it helps me get it out easier when I have to get it up a small hill from a pond.

Sounds durable - 10 yrs seems solid for this kind of craft I would think.

 

29 minutes ago, wasabi_VA said:

I only mention this to give you another option - using a small trailer like this - in case you want to consider it based upon the boat models you are evaluating.

The regulations of the reservoir state that any trailered boat must launch at the marina, and the marina might as well be light years from the inlet in terms of only having a trolling motor & safety.

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This video shows a guy sliding a Pelican into the back of a Ford Ranger I think. How does a Ranger compare to a S-10? Not sure which Pelican model this is. 

 

 

 

 

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I've been in and fished in the Pelican boat ... outstanding bass boat on small waters ... stability and maneuverability thumbs up  ... not bad in the wind ...

 

good fishing ...

 

 

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