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BubbaBassin’

The End of Senko Slinging

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I’ve been bass  fishing for a round a year and half now, the fish I have caught, have all been on senkos and one jig fish in which I got lucky and found a brushpile under a ledge  and somehow managed to pull said fish in without setting the hook, I am simply limited on the amount of time i get to fish, but, although successful, I want to exit the senko stage and enter something somewhat more advanced. I have tried many other baits, and am sad to say after hours upon hours I must be doing something wrong. Jigs, spinnerbaits, chatterbaits. I am not having successful outings. ANY help is appreciated.

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I've never fished Eufala but I'm sure there are bait and tackle shops near there that can help with specific info such as lure selection and what type of structure to look for. Stop in and ask questions. Buy a few lures and pick a few brains. They probably have the best and most current knowledge on the lake and how its fishing. Just my 2 cents.

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I don’t want this to sound offensive, but I wouldn’t consider Senko fishing to be any less advanced than other techniques. If they want a Senko, then give them what they want and enjoy the ride!

 

I do understand and appreciate the desire to branch out and learn other techniques, but I wouldn’t consider one any more sophisticated or advanced than the other. The complete angler is able to discern what they want and how they want it. Then they simply deliver it. 

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A senko has taught you plenty about fishing slow. A jig, texas rig, shakey head, drop shot, etc is a change, but still a similar approach. Next step would be learning how to power fish with a fast moving bait like a spinnerbait or crankbait. IMO a spinnerbait would be a much easier one to learn on. 3/8oz white. That's probably the first moving bait I caught bass on!

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Topwater is a good choice if you’re restricted to the bank as well... as long as water temps are 50 degrees or higher, try any type of topwater lure you like during low light periods - early morning, before sunset, cloudy/rainy days, or even targeting shady areas in the middle of a sunny day - you’re sure to get bit sooner or later.  Sometimes they’ll even smack it as soon as it hits the surface of the water :).

 

 

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9 minutes ago, Janderson45 said:

Topwater is a good choice if you’re restricted to the bank as well... as long as water temps are 50 degrees or higher, try any type of topwater lure you like during low light periods - early morning, before sunset, cloudy/rainy days, or even targeting shady areas in the middle of a sunny day - you’re sure to get bit sooner or later.  Sometimes they’ll even smack it as soon as it hits the surface of the water :).

 

 

In Alabama where the OP is located, I bet topwater temp is closer to 55

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1 minute ago, everythingthatswims said:

In Alabama where the OP is located, I bet topwater temp is closer to 55

 

Valid - I didn’t look at his location was just speaking in vast generalities.  Topwater is a great lure for people getting into the sport, they get to see the fish eat the lure which is both exciting and helpful in knowing when to set the hook, plus it’s often effective in predictable conditions like I described above.  

 

If you’re fishing from shore around heavy vegetation frogs can be a blast as well, they have a bit of a steep learning curve compared to other topwater baits, but if you start out fishing small ponds with heavy weeds like I did, a senko and a frog are about as effective as it gets! 

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If senkos are catching fish then don’t stop. Figure out when the bait is most effective and try other baits in time periods that aren’t quite as effective. There’s nothing “beginner” about one of the most transcendent baits to ever hit the market. There’s a reason why pros carry them by the gallon. But if you can fine tune your fishing to throw multiple baits that produce throughout the entire day at your lake then you will increase your odds of having spectacular days. It’s always a plus to have a confidence bait to fall back on during those tougher conditions 

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   You started at the top. Why go downhill?   :fishing-026:  jj

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Ribbon tail worms, flukes, trick worms - texas rigged !

That will broaden your horizons. 

😉

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For sure, stick with the Senko as noted above. You'll be using this for the rest of your fishing days.

 

To this if I were trying to branch out, I might start casting a weightless Shad bait like a Keitech Shad Impact. I prefer using an Owner CPS pin (medium) to nose hook it on a 3/0 60 degree bent jig hook, then Texas rig the plastic. Make casts and you will learn to fish it all the way up and down in the water column. You can let it fall sort of like a Senko, you can fish it off the bottom like a worm, you can jerk it back since it is a soft jerk bait, you can put some pace on the retrieve, you can toss it over vegetation or pads and drag it across the tops of lily pads, you can run it back on a fast retrieve if the bass want to play chase, just on and on and on.

 

It's a good bridge technique between true finesse at one end of the spectrum all the way to a power fishing technique and everything in between.

 

Too, you can likely use your existing rod and reel and line.

 

Brad

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All lure categories  catch  fish . Dont make your selections baed on what you think the fish want to eat . Make your selections based on what will effectively fish the cover and structure you are facing . Describe some situations you encounter  and have trouble with . then you will receive  some precise suggestions . 

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9 hours ago, rustown said:

...then give them what they want.

This is my approach, whether I'm 70 miles offshore or on a Catskills stream I can jump across, or anything in between. 

 

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I may be wrong but I am assuming you are tossing the senkos weightless.  If so, keep the senko and rig it on a 1/8 ounce Shakey head of your choice.  That will catch some good numbers and size.  That’ll get you familiar with bottom bumping baits for sure then you can branch out to better feel what a t-rig, jig or Carolina rig is doing.  You can get weighted wacky heads to rig a senko wacky style. Ned Rig heads and cut down a senko or use one of your old tore up ones, nail weights to learn the neko rig.  That senko can do a blue million things and all methods will trick bass.   Most important is to give yourself time with new techniques.  It is all about time on the water.  It’ll come. 

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Time to break out some topwaters Bubba.  Booyah Pad Crasher frogs- a white one for clerarer water and black in stained.  Then, a couple of Storm Chugbugs.  Both baits can be fished slowly, twitching, or with a faster walking retrieve.  Then you have your beloved senko as your backup bait if the fish misses your topwater!  Good luck man!

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I've had many fellow anglers say " You caught that on a lipless " maybe give them a shot and see. Just try to find a offering similar to the colors of the baitfish in the waters you fish. They cast like bullets and are pretty cheap at your local Walmart if they stock them. Even the Cordell spots catch bass and they're 1/2 the price of the tried and true Rat-l-traps. I haven't really gotten into the slow boring finesse style fishing much lately. I for the most part won't revert to it unless I feel the need to beat the skunk. Sure you can catch fish but dang is it boring! I'd rather throw a lipless for hours on end and enjoy the occasional out of nowhere strike of the hungry aggressive fish. This year I'm targeting a new PB and will be throwing larger baits, but the lipless will always be tied onto at least one of my combos at all times.

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Fish the conditions more than the bait. Water temp, air temp, wind, cloud cover all need to be taken into effect. Also if on the bank, casting straight out (unless you know of something being there) will not result into more fish. Work the banks from the bank. Treat it like it’s spot lock on a trolling motor. 20-30 minutes or casts with nothing, move. Lastly, don’t bring senkos with you on your next trip.

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Don't "end" your senko-slinging -- just add more tools to your toolbox.  Three lures to try next after becoming proficient with the senko:

(1) Weighted texas rig with ribbontail worm

(2) spinnerbait

(3) topwater popper

 

All three are easy to fish, easy to learn, train important presentation skills, can be fished with both spinning and casting tackle, catch bass everywhere, and will permit covering top, middle, and bottom of the water column.

 

 

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17 hours ago, Gundog said:

I've never fished Eufala but I'm sure there are bait and tackle shops near there that can help with specific info such as lure selection and what type of structure to look for. Stop in and ask questions. Buy a few lures and pick a few brains. They probably have the best and most current knowledge on the lake and how its fishing. Just my 2 cents.

*There are aprox. five ways to fish a senko - if you are only fishing a senko one way there is MUCH more to explore just staying with a senko .

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https://shopkarls.com/blog/7-bass-lures-that-you-can-rely-on-year-round/

 

It sounds like you're getting bored. I would probably learn some topwaters (Pop R, Spook, Torpedo, etc.) and some medium depth lures (spinnerbait would be first). Then you'll have something for top to bottom. Read up on the best times and conditions to expect each to work. I didn't catch whether you were bank bound. When I was, I looked for someone with a boat to learn from. Just being exposed to other people will teach you a lot because everyone fishes a little differently. And you can probably teach them a lot about the Senko.

 

interestingly, I don't do too well with a Senko. I like to power fish.

 

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Baits I like (and if I catch on them, I know you can) are:

1. Whopper Plopper. 

2. Texas rigged Zoom Speedworm. You can fish it fast, slow, in between. No wrong way to fish it. 

3. Lipless crank bait ( Rat L Trap, CottonCordell Spot, Redeye shad). I like a natural shad color or red. 

4. Natural shad colored spinnerbait.

5. Squarebill. Like the Trap, red or natural shad. 

6. Trick worm (pink or school bus yellow). Not much different from your Senko. Cast it weightless. Let it sink a little. Twitch it back. 

7. Alabama rig. 

8. Ned rig. 

Thess are my baits. Not sure I fish much else although I say I’m going to learn the shaky head. I’m going to play around a little with a Carolina rig this spring. 

I’ve thrown chatterbaits and swimjigs until I was blue in face and hadn’t made em produce yet.  

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I'd lhumbly like to throw my two cents worth in if you don't mind. I have found that by reading the seasonal fishing articles, I have a better understanding of what to throw and when. Every technique I've learned have been here. The videos won't make you an instant expert but will get you going in the right detection. 

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If you like throwing a senko, maybe different soft plastic......  A Zoom Lizard, Berkley Powerbait power worm, or GYCB Fat Ika.

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For some real fun, pay the $20 and grab yourself a popmax in gg bass. You can walk it,pop it,or just twitch it in slow. You won’t regret it, I looked at it in the store 3 times before I bought it. My only regret was not buying it the first time. Perch and secret gill also work well here, there are many colors to chose from. A whopper plopper 110 in blue gill is also a great choice and allot of fun. It’s not a bite that happens all the time but there’s not a more exciting way to fish imo. One good morning or evening topwater bite and you’ll be day dreaming about it the rest of the season. Good luck whatever you choose. 

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