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infiltwb

centrifugal or magnetic, which do you prefer and why

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My experience with baitcasters is into my 3rd season, and I have to say, between a handfull of daiwa, quantum, okuma and shimano reels, I am a huge fan of the ACS centrifugal system quantum uses followed closely by the centrifugal brakes in general. I have found magnetic brakes to be unreliable. I've used a few different magnetic systems, magforce z, magforce v and the lower end shimano magnetic and have to say IMO it sucks. Seems to be either on or off, no consistency with it.

The quantum setup to me at least seems to be the most consistent and reliable, although I would like to play around with one of the browning DBS reels that uses both centrifugal and magnetic iirc?

What do you guys think? I'm starting to find myself using the brakes less and less as I have begun moving into alot of conventional reel use in the salt, my thumb has gotten much more sensitive and accurate when casting.

I've narrowed down my biggest pros and cons below of each centrifugal and magnetic.

Centrifugal:

Pros-

Consistent performance

More precise control over a wider range of conditions

Cons-

Time consuming adjustment

Very sensitive to dirt intrusion

Higher Maintenence

Magnetic:

Pros-

Easy adjustment

Low Maintenence

Generally wider range of adjustment

Cons-

Inconsistent spool speed

More thumb control required on cast

Consistent howling on cast despite multiple professional cleanings/services.

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Centrifugal.  Why?  Because I like braking that actually works.

With regard to your centrifugal cons, it takes 10 seconds to adjust the braking on a Shimano reel.  Higher maintenance?  What maintenance is required?  When I perform my yearly cleaning, I will clean the brake race with a cotton swab.  Other than that, there is nothing to maintain.

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The "six-pin crowd" will show up here any minute to tell you that centrifugal is best. "All you have to do is set it and forget it."

So, let me counter by saying, you can do that with a magnetic brake, too.

People say all you have to do with a centrifugal brake is set it and forget it. I say under normal fishing conditions that's all you can do. Unless you appeal to having to open your side plate and play with little weights on pins on a boat with wet or sticky hands. But when you set it and forget it, all you've done is pick some compromise setting that handles a wide range of lures reasonably well, but hardly any optimally. Nothing that says you can't do this with a magnetic brake. But a magnetic brake at least gives you the option of fine tuning your reel to a specific bait without opening your reel when you do change baits.

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Definitely magnetic for me! I hate having to open the side cover to adjust the brakes! Plus i think you get more levels of adjustments(smaller increments) with magnetic brakes.

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Hmm...

I'm on holiday with Micro, so no arguments tonight.

All I have to say is, "Centrifugal brakes are effective

and VERY user friendly."

8-)

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There is no need of 'fine-tuning' a centrifugal braking system.  Compromise?  What is compromising about activating two brakes and never having to worry about adjusting again?

Magnetic braking acts at the wrong point of the cast.

As far as adjusting on the water, it is as easy as quarter-turn, activate or deactivate collars and close the sideplate.  30 seconds tops.  Some make the process out to be akin to overhauling a 12 cylinder engine.

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I like the quantum, easy to adjust and a wide range of settings...At least on last years model

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There is no need of 'fine-tuning' a centrifugal braking system. Compromise? What is compromising about activating two brakes and never having to worry about adjusting again?

Would you really have us believe that is the perfect setting under all circumstances and with all lures. Heck, why even make a 6-pin then. Just make a 2 pin and have them on all the time. Or that might be too Abu'y for some. :o

Like I said, do it that way. No reason you can't do the same with a mag brake.

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Hmm...

I'm on holiday with Micro, so no arguments tonight.

All I have to say is, "Centrifugal brakes are effective

and VERY user friendly."

8-)

You'll wait 'til tomorrow when I'm at work to respond.   ;D

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Centrifugal for me.  I have both Shimano's and a Revo STX.  I just find the centrifugal much easier and a lot more reliable.

Later, :o

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i like some implementations of magnetic brakes (daiwa's magforce) and really dislike others (revos). to me, mag brakes  tend to be fussier, need more frequent adjustment, and are less-forgiving. for the most part, i prefer centrifugal brakes as i find them extremely easy to use, very reliable and very consistent. once i adjust the brakes to 2 on/4 off, i never touch them again. i still have both types in my collection.

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The 2 brakes work at different parts of the cast.

The centrifugal works during the initial spool spin up.  Probably the hardest part of baitcasting to control properly due to the rather violent nature of snapping your wrist and forearm during casting.

It's also the part of the cast that makes or breaks distance and whether a backlash can happen further into the cast due to line looping on the spool due to overrun at startup.

Mag brakes work towards the end of the cast when thumb control is important.

Then there's Daiwa, with their mag braking system which interacts with the spool rotation throughout the cast.

Centrifugal brakes are probably more important for overall casting consistency.  They've been around a lot longer.  Mag brakes were invented as a sales aid for those afraid of baitcasters and backlashes, especially newer anglers.  

If you want the best of both worlds, get a dual braking system.  I have many.  My usual setup has the centrifugal brakes on but the mags turned off.  If the wind kicks up or I'm using a higher profile bait that tends to hang in the air during the cast I can adjust the problems out with the mag brakes.

Normally, on my patriarchs, my thumb is only on the spool at initial startup and when I want the lure to stop.  I rarely have to thumb the spool during most of the cast.  

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The 2 brakes work at different parts of the cast.

The centrifugal works during the initial spool spin up. Probably the hardest part of baitcasting to control properly due to the rather violent nature of snapping your wrist and forearm during casting.

It's also the part of the cast that makes or breaks distance and whether a backlash can happen further into the cast due to line looping on the spool due to overrun at startup.

Mag brakes work towards the end of the cast when thumb control is important.

This is where the discussion gets interesting for me :o I'm most concerned about the loops that develop deeper in the spool and may not be noticed after a cast. Where in the cast do these deep loops occur and what technique / brake systems are best for limiting them. I'm using centrifugal brake reels. Thanks!

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centrifugal is best.both is better.get a pflueger patriarch!!!

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As a new user of baitcasters centrifugal have been by far better for me. I have tried a mag brake reel and had nothing but issues. Switch to the centrifugal and was making cast of good length with no backlashes straight out of the box. Just set it to 2 pins on, by reading on the site here it seemed to be the most used setting and all was good.

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30 years of baitcasting...

Either system for me..... :o

The way I set my reels there are no problems with either systems, and all are setup prior to hitting the water..

Tight Lines All!!

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Which do I prefer ? both

Spool control is where it 's always been ---> in the thumb.

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Normally are the pins clicked in or out when the brakes are active?

Always "out", but not beyond the last keeper.

Two "on" are immediately opposed to each other.

Three on is every other brake on.

Start with all six on if this is your first baitcaster

and crank the cast control down finger tight.

Over time you will loosen things up to increase

casting distance.

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OK THANX!  I have a couple of new baitcasters I haven't even used cause I couldn't figure out which engaged the brake and which way released it.  It has six pins and I put three in and three out (opposite of each other) but was afraid of a bad birds nest.

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It has six pins and I put three in and three out (opposite of each other) but was afraid of a bad birds nest.

That doesn't sound right.  You'd want to have every other pin out to get three on and three off, and still be balanced.  Otherwise, turn them on or off in pairs, or even numbers, like four on in an "X" pattern.

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The 2 brakes work at different parts of the cast.

The centrifugal works during the initial spool spin up. Probably the hardest part of baitcasting to control properly due to the rather violent nature of snapping your wrist and forearm during casting.

It's also the part of the cast that makes or breaks distance and whether a backlash can happen further into the cast due to line looping on the spool due to overrun at startup.

Mag brakes work towards the end of the cast when thumb control is important.

Then there's Daiwa, with their mag braking system which interacts with the spool rotation throughout the cast.

Centrifugal brakes are probably more important for overall casting consistency. They've been around a lot longer. Mag brakes were invented as a sales aid for those afraid of baitcasters and backlashes, especially newer anglers.

If you want the best of both worlds, get a dual braking system. I have many. My usual setup has the centrifugal brakes on but the mags turned off. If the wind kicks up or I'm using a higher profile bait that tends to hang in the air during the cast I can adjust the problems out with the mag brakes.

Normally, on my patriarchs, my thumb is only on the spool at initial startup and when I want the lure to stop. I rarely have to thumb the spool during most of the cast.

If you're snapping your wrist and forearm violently you're cast control knob is set too tight.  When **I** started loosening the cast control knob to a point where the weight of the bait is pulling the line out easily, then both the centrifugal or mechanical brake works more effectively.

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I like a reel that has both, but if I had to choose just one I would have to go with cetrifugal, the rest I can do with my thumb.

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I have a cheaper quantum reel with a magentic brake, and it is unreliable and I usually get 3 - 5 backlashes per day. But since I'm buying a Curado I think I won't have to worry about that as much.

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