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haggard

Why spinning gear for drop shot?

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I frequently hear and read that when you use a drop shot technique, you should reach for the spinning gear. Why is that? Why not a baitcaster?

 

I get that drop shotting is considered a finesse technique and finesse is often associated with lighter lures, which in turn means spinning gear might be better suited for casting those light lures.

 

But there's also a sinker at the end of the line, so it's not like you're casting a weightless worm.

 

One advantage I can see for spinner over a baitcaster is that if you want to cast a short distance out, rather than just drop directly under the boat, a spinning reel will more easily let the rig drop vertically once it hits the water (because the line just falls off the spool), as opposed to pendulum-ing back towards the boat (because the spool tensions the line).

 

Other than that, why wouldn't you reach for a baitcaster?

 

 

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Spinning reels are easier to open a bail letting the rig free fall straight down on small diameter line then most baitcasting reels. It really depends on line type/dia,depth fished and your preference.

Tom

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As Tom said, you want to have the bait fall straight down when fishing a drop shot.

 

If you decide to cast it out, which is also done with a drop shot, the bait will fall straight down on a spinning setup as opposed to flowing back towards you as it falls with a baitcaster.

 

Also, you don't need the power of a baitcasting reel to set the hook with a drop shot.  You just life the rod's tip to set the hook. Of course, you can still set the hook hard with a drop shot but it is designed to nail the bass by using a soft hook setting approach.

 

You can still use a baitcaster, but using a spinning rig is easier and you can use lighter line, too.

 

Give it a try and let us know how you do.  That is, after the snow and ice melts away!!!!

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55 minutes ago, Sam said:

Also, you don't need the power of a baitcasting reel to set the hook with a drop shot.  You just life the rod's tip to set the hook. 

Why is that? Is it because of the small hook size on a drop shot rig?

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20 minutes ago, haggard said:

Why is that? Is it because of the small hook size on a drop shot rig?

Traditional drop shot hooks are thin wired, similar to treble hooks. That allows them to penetrate the bass with low force but bends them if you apply too much force.

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I drop shot with a tatula sv on a major craft finess rod. I have an extremely high hookup ratio with this rig. the only time I pick up a spinning rod,  is for a vertical drop.  I'm not saying this is the best way, but it works well for me

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29 minutes ago, HeavyTwenty said:

Traditional drop shot hooks are thin wired, similar to treble hooks. That allows them to penetrate the bass with low force but bends them if you apply too much force.

Ok thanks, this is starting to make more sense. Sounds like it's all about tradeoffs.

 

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27 minutes ago, HeavyTwenty said:

Traditional drop shot hooks are thin wired, similar to treble hooks. That allows them to penetrate the bass with low force but bends them if you apply too much force.

Right.

 

The drop shot rig is a real finesse rig with light line (under 8 pounds) and a light wire hook.

 

In Japan they fish the drop shot on two-pound test.  I have some two-pound but have not used it to date.

 

 

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There's a pretty fair number of anglers that use baitcaster for DS, it's about preference really. Also the technique affectionately known as "Bubba shotting", which is basically an upscaled version of a DS, is done almost exclusively with casting gear. I feel it's easier to make the fine shaking movements to impart action on the bait with a spinning setup than it is a baitcaster, which is one of the main reasons I use spinning gear for the technique. 

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Another thing is it is a technique that you don’t have to impart much action to. Large rod, weight, and lb test line can kill that action. I do believe there is a time when fish are on beds that pitching a dropshot on baitcasting equipment is ideal. Outside of that I stay with my spinning set up.

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I usually drop shot on spinning rod because I typically fish the drop shot as a finesse tactic with light line and light weights on warm sunny days when they aren't going for moving baits. It's also easier to drop the line straight down, and you don't need big line to set the hook with, making it perfect for spinning gear.

 

However, this is not the only way to fish a drops hot. You can take your medium or medium heavy casting rod and tie up a drop shot and a 3/8 or 1/2oz weight, 30 or 40lb braid tie to a 10 or 12lb leader, tie on a texas rigged senko and throw it around heavy cover. I haven't tried this yet but I have seen it be used as a very effective way to fish the edge of grass lines and weed beds when people were fed up with getting stuck in the grass.

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I went bottom fishing off the coast for sea bass and Ling cod several years ago. I bought  some large EWG hooks and 1 ounce sinkers with huge worms.  The guys in the boat thought I was crazy until I wacked the fish.  I was using 25 pound mono and a heavy action bass casting outfit.  I use spinning for my fresh water because I'm fishing light line and light weights with fine wire hooks.

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Small hooks for DS ? :dontknow:

 

How small ..... like 3/0 or something like that ? :huh:

 

Cuz 3/0 is purty darn small

 

Besides, how can you DS with 6 or 8 lb test when you fish this ?

 

post-369-130162929879_thumb.jpg

 

in other words, DS is a rig and you adapt it to your needs, don’t believe everything you read.

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Watch pro tournament bass anglers like MLF, very few will use a baitcasting outfit when fishing a drop shot rig, better choices if bass are eating lures presented on heavier line.

Tom

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Sometimes you get lazy and don't check you weight often enough and it flys off on the cast.  Spinning reel, ah shucks, you lost a weight.  Casting reel.....

pJnBsPzl.jpg

 

I went with a spinning combo for my dropshot needs mainly because I enjoy spinning reels and wanted an excuse to use one more often, but I don't doubt, backlashes aside, that I could fish it just fine with a casting combo.  

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I use spinning gear fr drop shot fishing on the rare occasions I use it, but...

 

I'm missing something regarding dropping a line straight down.

 

  1. Spinning gear: hold rod tip over the edge with right hand, open bail with left hand, rig drops straight down.  When weight hits bottom, close bail with left hand.
  2. Casting gear: Hold rod tip over the edge with right hand, press release with right thumb, rig drops straight down. When weight hits bottom, nudge reel handle slightly to engage spool.

I'm not seeing one being easier than the other (I might, in fact see using a baitcaster as easier because it could all be done with one hand)...what am I missing?

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Further North said:

I use spinning gear fr drop shot fishing on the rare occasions I use it, but...

 

I'm missing something regarding dropping a line straight down.

 

  1. Spinning gear: hold rod tip over the edge with right hand, open bail with left hand, rig drops straight down.  When weight hits bottom, close bail with left hand.
  2. Casting gear: Hold rod tip over the edge with right hand, press release with right thumb, rig drops straight down. When weight hits bottom, nudge reel handle slightly to engage spool.

I'm not seeing one being easier than the other (I might, in fact see using a baitcaster as easier because it could all be done with one hand)...what am I missing?

 

 

I was thinking the same thing but was afraid to ask. 

 

I have used baitcasters for dropshotting occasionally for the one handed approach you mentioned.

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Just now, NYWayfarer said:

I was thinking the same thing but was afraid to ask. 

 

I have used baitcasters for dropshotting occasionally for the one handed approach you mentioned.

Yeah...look at it this way: You don't have to set your beer down. ;)

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If you're barely going to fish it then it doesn't really matter. If you drop shot constantly you'll figure it out really quickly. 

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Drop shot is a terminal rig with lots of variations. Let cover, weight, line etc determine the best tackle for the circumstances just as you would a t rig etc. 

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5 hours ago, Further North said:

I use spinning gear fr drop shot fishing on the rare occasions I use it, but...

 

I'm missing something regarding dropping a line straight down.

 

  1. Spinning gear: hold rod tip over the edge with right hand, open bail with left hand, rig drops straight down.  When weight hits bottom, close bail with left hand.
  2. Casting gear: Hold rod tip over the edge with right hand, press release with right thumb, rig drops straight down. When weight hits bottom, nudge reel handle slightly to engage spool.

I'm not seeing one being easier than the other (I might, in fact see using a baitcaster as easier because it could all be done with one hand)...what am I missing?

 

 

Just a guess, maybe because after the lure hits the water, the baitcaster spool (presumably now at rest) presents more resistance than the spinner due to needing to overcome static friction - to get the spool moving again for the drop to the bottom. Maybe the spool tension knob is too tight, but even when set loosey goosey, the spool still needs to make that initial push from rest, which isn't as easy as when it's already rolling.

 

For whatever reason (static friction, wind, current, tension knob set too tight), be it a drop shot or some other technique when I want the lure to get to the bottom, I've definitely needed to guide the baitcaster more often than the spinner. My usual method for guiding a baitcaster lure to the bottom is to disengage the spool into free spool mode, gently rest my thumb on the spooled line and peel off a couple feet of line at a time, repeat. For the spinner, all I think about is keeping a slight tension on the line as it drops, and that's it. Personally I prefer baitcasters in general BTW but for drop shot I can see some advantages with the spinner. Either works fine of course in capable hands.

 

 

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1 minute ago, haggard said:

Just a guess, maybe because after the lure hits the water, the baitcaster spool (presumably now at rest) presents more resistance than the spinner due to needing to overcome static friction - to get the spool moving again for the drop to the bottom. Maybe the spool tension knob is too tight, but even when set loosey goosey, the spool still needs to make that initial push from rest, which isn't as easy as when it's already rolling.

 

For whatever reason (static friction, wind, current, tension knob set too tight), be it a drop shot or some other technique when I want the lure to get to the bottom, I've definitely needed to guide the baitcaster more often than the spinner. My usual method for guiding a baitcaster lure to the bottom is to disengage the spool into free spool mode, gently rest my thumb on the spooled line and peel off a couple feet of line at a time, repeat. For the spinner, all I think about is keeping a slight tension on the line as it drops, and that's it. Personally I prefer baitcasters btw.

 

 

Thank you.

 

I prefer baitcasters too...for most things...have used a St. Croix LXS610MLXF spinning rod for what little drop shot fishing I've done, so far.

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5 hours ago, Further North said:

I use spinning gear fr drop shot fishing on the rare occasions I use it, but...

 

I'm missing something regarding dropping a line straight down.

 

  1. Spinning gear: hold rod tip over the edge with right hand, open bail with left hand, rig drops straight down.  When weight hits bottom, close bail with left hand.
  2. Casting gear: Hold rod tip over the edge with right hand, press release with right thumb, rig drops straight down. When weight hits bottom, nudge reel handle slightly to engage spool.

I'm not seeing one being easier than the other (I might, in fact see using a baitcaster as easier because it could all be done with one hand)...what am I missing?

 

 

 

I once took a guy out with me that only brought casting gear.  We were dropshotting in 55'.  I'd open the bail and drop my bait.  He'd drop it at the same time and peel, peel, peel, peel line off.  I'd be on the bottom and hooked up before his would be half way to the bottom.  After an hour of this, he borrowed a spinning outfit off of me.

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Just now, S Hovanec said:

 

I once took a guy out with me that only brought casting gear.  We were dropshotting in 55'.  I'd open the bail and drop my bait.  He'd drop it at the same time and peel, peel, peel, peel line off.  I'd be on the bottom and hooked up before his would be half way to the bottom.  After an hour of this, he borrowed a spinning outfit off of me.

That ties directly to what @haggard said above.

 

Makes sense.

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Heck, you could use a stick and some line tied to the

end if you wanted. In my quest to go all-and-only 

baitcasting a couple/few years back, I found I could 

easily do nearly everything on a BC that I could do

on spinning gear.

 

Yes, the lighter drops you do have peel line off with

a BC. For that, spinning is better. Really light baits

go further, usually, with spinning gear (unless you're

tuned and have the right rod on BC).

 

But my quest ended with me realizing spinning was 

simply easier. Wind, backlashes, skipping, etc., are

the domain of spinning gear -- NOT that you canNOT

do it with BC, but me, I find it easier and less prone to 

day-wrecking headaches.

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