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tje0705

Shakey head on casting gear?

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Hey guys. I’ve decided to really fish the shakey head more this year and was wonder if there were any real disadvantages to throwing it on a casting setup. I was thinking a medium moderate action rod with 12lb test and a 6.8 reel. I have spinning setups but I am just not as proficient with them. What are you guys thoughts on this. 

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I prefer medium fast or extra fast for fishing shaky heads on casting gear. 30Lb braid to 12Lb leader. 

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For me a shakey head is a finesse deal. Spinning rod, 6lb. line

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I use it with the magnum shakyheads I pour but prefer spinning gear for the more standard sized rigs. It can be done though. I agree that I'd go fast or extra fast for a shakyhead rod. 

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I almost always use bc for shaky.  I use rods from 6.5' to 7.5'/  12# fluro/ 7 to 8 speed reels.

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I use casting gear for shakeyhead as well. The only technique I prefer spinning gear for is drop shots. My combo of choice is an NRX 852c with a steez and 10lb sniper.

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The main reasons to use spinning gear is to throw light weight baits more efficiently. One specific reason to use them with a shakeyhead is to get a very straight vertical drop. Many times a shakey head is used on structure like stair stepped walls or bluffs. A baitcaster is not as efficient at doing that job.  I am seriously amazed that with today's quality gear an angler would choose not to become proficient with both spinning and baitcasting rigs.  The are tools. A good mechanic would never try to rebuild an engine without ever using a screwdriver, a wrench or a hammer. These are the tools of the trade and they would be handicapping themselves.  I fish with 12 to 14 baitcasters in my rod locker, but I also have 3 spinning rods that are great at their intended purpose as well.  Things like shakey heads, real light texas rigs, Ned Rigs, and light jerkbaits in cold water all fish well on a spinning rod.

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2 hours ago, fishnkamp said:

Things like shakey heads, real light texas rigs, Ned Rigs, and light jerkbaits in cold water all fish well on a spinning rod.

 

They also fish well on baitcast reels with light weight spools.  In the past when almost every baitcast reel had 20+ gram spool with the cc knob set for a slow drop I can understand the mindset that baitcast reels are only to be used for heavier baits and that they are unable to produce a verticle drop with light weight baits.  Today you can buy a reel with light weight spool for a under $60 and set the cc knob so loose that you have side to side play and go cast UL baits.  Times have changed.

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Times change, but you still can not get the same vertical drop with any baitcaster that you can with a spinning reel.  It will not perform the same.  Here is a picture of the exact structure I fished years ago on Center Hill lake in TN. That wall stair stepped down over 60 feet. Very large Kentucky spotted bass were holding on the rocky stairs. We would throw up on the ledge, slowly swim the bait out a bit, then open the bail and let it drop straight down, fish the ledge and repeat.If you try that with your baitcaster, you will not be able to walk down the ledge.  We caught some world record spots off that wall that day using a 1/4 ounce shaky head and a Elastec straight tail worm.  My PB was just over 7 pounds.  I believe in learning to use all the tools in the tool box and applying them to the situation.  There is no way you are going to be successful throwing certain baits on ANY baitcaster. Go try throwing a 1/10 ounce Ned Rig on your UL baitcasting rig!LOL

The second picture is one of many bass my wife and I caught on Dale Hollow fishing for smallies on Dale Hollow last year.  We arrived two days after the big females left thew beds. they were hunkered down in grass beds in about 20 to 25 foot deep on main lake flats. They would eat nothing except Ned Rigs. My largest during that trip was weighed at 7# 3.  This bass was 5#2

 

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I never really understood the whole  "vertical drop" thing. I do all my fishing from the bank or kayak, so maybe I'm missing something, but when I'm fishing most lures my line is laying on the water before the lure has sunk more than a foot or so, so the handle is engaged or the bail closed seconds after the lure touches down.  

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If you look at that rock wall you can see the layers or ledges in the picture. The wall continued down like steps all the way to the bottom at 60 feet.  You cast up on to the first step. Then swim the bait out some(using the rod) controlling the line on the reel with your finger.( I never closed the bail) As the lure comes off the ledge you allow the line to peel of the spool. Once the bait fall straight down to the next level you do it again until you feel a bite, close the bail and do a sweeping hookset.  Using a baitcaster the line would have enough resistance that the bait would pendulum away from the rock wall and out of the strike zone.

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The argument is that due to the nature of spinning reels you can open the bail and a falling bait will pull off line and that baitcasters can't do this.  

 

With the spool tension set for side to side play and a light weight spool I have no problem getting baits to fall vertically in free spool.  A reel with heavy spool with a lot of spool tension and I see the argument.  The other argument some will make is that reels that can do this cost too much or are prohibitively expensive in comparison to spinning reels.  This is no longer true as well.

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Shaky head jig is very similar to doodling a T-rig with brass & glass, definately a finesse rig with bait casting tackle. Don Iovino is the father of finesse fishing and his signature Major Craft Splash-it casting rod perfect choice for a shaky head jig.

Tom

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Time and place for everything, right?!  I almost always have a shakey tied on.  If i'm going to be fishing steeper structure or clearer water, spinning setup gets the nod.  But being an Okie, more often than not, I'm fishing shallow rocky areas in stained water, and for that, my 7' MHF with 15# flouro takes the cake.

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Don’t know from where ppl have the idea that shakeyheading is none with featherweight jigheads, guess they haven’t seen me fishing with 3/4 oz jigheads and 17 lb nylon and heavy casting gear .....

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Jig worm fishing (shakey head) is a technique that is best accomplished with tackle that provides the most sensitive feel of the bait.  For me that's accomplished with a spinning outfit.

 

 

oe

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Almost all the pro's use spinning gear with shakey heads.  I was watching Dean Rojas on Bassmaster live load the boat with a spinning reel and light line.  Sometimes the 1/8oz shakey head is very effective and it's very difficult to cast on a baitcaster.

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On 3/7/2018 at 7:18 AM, CroakHunter said:

I prefer medium fast or extra fast for fishing shaky heads on casting gear. 30Lb braid to 12Lb leader. 

I always go with a M/F spinning rod with 8lb test, but this sounds like a decent setup for casting gear. Might even try a 10lb leader.

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12 minutes ago, Lasher said:

Almost all the pro's use spinning gear with shakey heads.  I was watching Dean Rojas on Bassmaster live load the boat with a spinning reel and light line.  Sometimes the 1/8oz shakey head is very effective and it's very difficult to cast on a baitcaster.

 

Depends on the baitcast reel.  I have baitcast reels I use for UL baits where a 1/8 oz shaky head is too heavy and I can cast all the line off the reel.  I also have baitcasters I use to target musky where I couldn't even dream of throwing an 1/8 oz with the reel.  

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i use both spinning and baitcasting. depends on the weight of the shakyhead.

I use baitcaster whenever possible. spinning only when necessary.

 

most of the time I use a 3/16 or 1/4 oz. on a medium action baitcaster with 10 lb flourocarbon.

caught my largest largemouth and smallmouth last year on that setup.

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