Jump to content
Tackett1980

Got a new nice baitcaster. I hate it.

Recommended Posts

I tried to use baitcasters 20-25 years ago when I was a young man.  I was never able to use the thing.  I went back to spinning and never looked back.  

 

A few few weeks ago I got the itch to try the baitcaster again.  I thought maybe I was just inpatient in my youth and now that I’m old maybe I’d be able to master it.  

 

So so long story short, for about 2.5 weeks now, I’ve been watching YouTube videos and practicing in the backyard.

 

 I can. Not.  Use.  This.  Thing.

 

The only way I can keep it from Back lashing is to tighten everything to the point to where I can’t throw it very far, plus I can’t hit the broad side of a barn with it which bothers me more than anything.

 

i can plug the exact same spot with my spinning gear from 25 yards.  I can’t do anything near that with this thing.

 

i think I’m just too much of a gorilla to finesse this thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What reel is it?

What bait are you throwing?

What rod are you using?

 

All of these things make a difference.  If you are trying to throw a weightless 4 inch senko you won't be getting much distance and it'll be very easy to backlash. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What model reel do you have? I fish baitcasters most of the time and "finesse" is the exact opposite of how I would treat them. All I do usually is apply a slight amount of thumb pressure, but I put some serious "umph" into my casts. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cheap or expensive, learning a baitcaster can take a whole season to fully know what your doing with it. Takes a ton of paitence, trust me I had 100's of backlashes starting out. STILL DO lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What SIZE and TYPE of line? And what weight of bait were you using?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's just hard work man.  You will get frustrated for sure.  Anyone you know that could help couch you a bit.  Even a random dude at the boat launch would likely be eager to give a half hour or so to offer pointers.

 

YouTube is an outstanding resource but can only take you so far.  Having an experienced person at your disposal would be invaluable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Members are trying to help the op and need some basic answers like rod model, reel model and lure weight as a minimum.

Most spinning outfit anglers that transition to bait casting blame the reel and it's nearly always poor casting mechanics....trying to whip the rod like a spinning rod.

Tom

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

use what works for you

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, WRB said:

Members are trying to help the op and need some basic answers like rod model, reel model and lure weight as a minimum.

Most spinning outfit anglers that transition to bait casting blame the reel and it's nearly always poor casting mechanics....trying to whip the rod like a spinning rod.

Tom

I’m not trying to sound like I am blaming the reel.  I know I just suck at it and I honestly don’t see the point.  It seems like more work than it’s worth.  Really the purpose of the thread was more to imply the question of “why am I doing this?”

 

I catch fish on spinning gear, I’ve caught some monsters on spinning gear.  It seems like I’m opening myself up to a bunch of headache I don’t really need, so my question is really, what’s there to gain by doing this to myself?  Is this worth spending the next “x” amount of outings ticking with my equipment instead of catching fish?

 

answers to questions:

Reel: kastking royale elite (8.1)

rod:  st croix MF 7’

line:  trilene xt 12lb mono.

lure:  practicing with a lunker hunter poppin frog 

 

Sorry it took so long to respond I didn’t expect replies this soon. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

once you adjust your reel properly it should be pretty easy.

 

start by engaging all brakes.

 

adjust the spool tension knob so that the lure slowly falls to the ground when you engage the clutch button.

 

When casting wait for the rod to load up before you swing forward. gently thumb the spool while the lure is in mid cast and stop the spool as it splashes down. as you get good you will be able to lift your thumb off when the lure is in mid cast.  

 

back off the brakes as you get the hang of it to gain more distance.

 

you should be able to cast farther with your baitcasting rod than your spinning rod for heavier baits

 

the main advantage is that they have much more torque so for big bladed baits and  big crankbaits baitcasters are 1000x easier to retrieve such baits.

 

keep practicing and don't give up just yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, lo n slo said:

use what works for you

I agree with lo n slow. Use what your comfortable with. Both will work

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reel - questionable 

Rod - good 

Line - good

Lure - questionable 

 

If it’s the small frog then try something heavier to start with until you get the hang of it. With a decent quality baitcaster you can use it with little to no thumb at all until right before the lure hits water. I have no experience with KK reels so I can’t say if it’s good or bad in terms of quality. I do know a lot of times in life the whole “you get what you pay for” saying rings true. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Release earlier than you do on the spinning set up , or else you will cast it in the ground with a big back-lash .

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I prefer learning with a 5/8-3/4 oz practice casting plug for 2 reasons; aerodynamic shape and flat sides to prevent line twist. Fast action rods are not the best choice to learn with, but that is what you have.

You can look at vedio's all day and I think Glenn's instructional bed is a good start.

Catt's suggestion to put a rolled news paper under your upper casting arm is also a good idea to reduce over swinging. Letting the rod do it work requires slowing the casting motion down,from then on it's timing the release.

If you don't want to practice and happy with spinning I can't see any reason to beat yourself up to learn something your heart isn't into.

Tom

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have zero experience with any KastKing reel.  Therefore I have no idea how well their magnetic brakes work.  I can suggest several reels that should help you to have fewer backlashes.  Any Daiwa with 3D Magforce.  These will be used reels in the T3 series.  They were the first reels I ever used where I didn't need to apply thumb pressure somewhere in the cast.  I have an older Shimano Exsence that is nearly impossible to backlash as long as you don't go below Max on the Max...Min setting.  Max and any other setting need no thumb....and this is with loose spool tension.

 

Even used the Exsence is expensive.  Probably can find a T3 for $140 or less.  There are a couple older gold colored Carbonlites for sale on another forum for $55.  These have a dual braking system and can be set up to be almost backlash proof.  I imagine most other dual brake reels are similar.  An older Patriarch XT is another dual brake reel that would be a good choice.  My last one cost me $65....it was a $250 reel when new.

 

It is very important to know that you can't cast a baitcast rod like you are use to doing with your spinning rods.  Smoothness is critical.  Are you using a side arm roll cast?  If not, I would highly suggest you do.  It helps a lot to smooth out the rod reversal.  Jerks here cause an immediate backlash if not very careful.  Even for people use to a baitcast reel.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Tackett1980 said:

“Why am I doing this?”

 

It seems like I’m opening myself up to a bunch of headache I don’t really need, so my question is really, what’s there to gain by doing this to myself?

 

Is this worth spending the next “x” amount of outings ticking with my equipment instead of catching fish?

You can do it. 

Yes it’s going to be difficult at first, as are most things for which you haven’t developed “muscle memory” or fundamentals.

 

It will be worth it. Casting gear is not “necessary” but there plenty of times when it can be more efficient and can help you catch more fish. It will not, however, change your life or make fish jump in the boat. On the contrary, feeing good about mastering something new, may.

 

My suggestion is two-fold.

1) Start with an at least 1/2 ounce moving bait that doesn’t require tricky casts and you can cover a lot of open water quickly. Crank the tension knob down until the bait doesn’t fall or just barely falls with the spook released. Crank the brakes down all the way. Start out making gentle casts and practice the same type of cast to start to train your thumb.

2) Keep practicing through the mistakes and the tiredness. This will really help to solidify the “muscle” memory. Don’t end your practice session on a backlash.

 

Backlashes are annoying as hell. You can do it though.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Tackett1980 said:

I’m not trying to sound like I am blaming the reel.  I know I just suck at it and I honestly don’t see the point.  It seems like more work than it’s worth.  Really the purpose of the thread was more to imply the question of “why am I doing this?”

 

I catch fish on spinning gear, I’ve caught some monsters on spinning gear.  It seems like I’m opening myself up to a bunch of headache I don’t really need, so my question is really, what’s there to gain by doing this to myself?  Is this worth spending the next “x” amount of outings ticking with my equipment instead of catching fish?

 

answers to questions:

Reel: kastking royale elite (8.1)

rod:  st croix MF 7’

line:  trilene xt 12lb mono.

lure:  practicing with a lunker hunter poppin frog 

 

Sorry it took so long to respond I didn’t expect replies this soon. 

 

 

I am using the same reel you do and I love it ! Its on my frog Rod which is an heavy though and I'm casting a 5/8 to 3/4 HB frog. It cast a mile and a half. I'm Rocket launching that frog just a few spins shy of the spool knot. I guess you are using the smaller frog since you have a medium. Like the other guys said, you more need the Pendulum/momentum effect of the lure than the whip of the rod to propulsate the lure. There should be no wrist flick. Its a Little bit like a golf swing (straight forearms and wrist) and you need to let the lure go a tad before what you are use to with the spinning reel otherwise, like golf, you'll slice.

 

I'll double check my settings tomorrow and let you know. Whats that frog weight ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, guys that told you to not end your training on a backlash are right. I would push that further and try to finish on a short sequence of good, satisfying cast. That means more distance and accuracy than when you start the training session. I use to practice at the end if the Fishing day for 15 to 45 minutes (my 45 minutes session included an aggressive pike that helped 😂) I also went out to a field at least for an initial setup, and tried these setups on the bank. Also try to notice when the backlash occurs, at the beginning or the end of the cast. Also note that frog will be influenced by the winds, you Will likely have to crank brake and spool tension when casting into winds and lose some distance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Tackett1980 said:

i think I’m just too much of a gorilla to finesse this thing.

If I can do it, you can do it. I picked up a BC for the first time last year and got the hang of it in about a month. People will help you here. Braid is easier to pick out than the other stuff. Walk out 75-80 yards of line, then tape the spool so that the line won't come out any farther than that. This will help you reduce "birds nests". Answer some people's questions about line/reel model, lure you're throwing, etc and you'll get some solid advice.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why use a baitcaster?   For me, I get off way more casts with a baitcaster.   I also find fighting a fish much easier (especially for my hands/fingers) and I get a lot more power to control fish.  Topwater frog in slop on spinning.........yuck and ouch!

 

i am not a professional, but here are a couple insights.   I find it way easier and more accurate for me to use a lighter power rod (M and/or glass instead of MH Or especially H).  A more  aerodynamic, heavier lure (1/2 oz).   And do NOT learn to cast a baitcaster in the wind.   Wind will frustrate the heck out of you.   

 

I really couldn't fish the same without a  Baitcaster.    I think you will find it very worth it and rewarding once you do.  Like everyone said, it can be frustrating, but as many people as have learned to do it, you got this!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lets start this with a simple question. Where are you located?  We have members all over the place and many would be happy to give you some personal assistance. If you live anywhere near MD, DC, VA, DE or PA we could meet. I can cast and correctly set your rig up, then help you learn how to properly work with it. I can also bring one or two of my personal setups with some of my Daiwa reels so you can see what another rod and reel play like.  If you are not in my area, then I am sure another member would happily meet you at some school's grassy field or some pond for some one on one training.  That also helps to determine if the problem is a defective reel, improperly installed line (slipping on the spool), just poor casting techniques or some other issue.  I noticed your personal info says you are a newer member, so welcome to our playground.  As for your situation it helps to fill in your profile so members close to you know they can personally help. Another good reason is many of our members end up sharing fishing trips with other members. I personally have shared my boat with at least a dozen anglers from several websites I belong to.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Tackett1980 said:

  I know I just suck at it and I honestly don’t see the point.  It seems like more work than it’s worth.

 

Keep at it and follow the membership’s advice. Once you get the hang of it you’ll “see the point.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It takes time..... it takes time... be patient you will get it eventually if we learned so will you. Can actually take even a couple of months till you finally get it down. You’re gonna get it just give it time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Tackett1980 said:

 

 

I catch fish on spinning gear, I’ve caught some monsters on spinning gear.  It seems like I’m opening myself up to a bunch of headache I don’t really need, so my question is really, what’s there to gain by doing this to myself?  Is this worth spending the next “x” amount of outings ticking with my equipment instead of catching fish?

I agree with use what you comfortable with, if you like spinning why not? There are many pros out there that use only spinning outfit. Spinning these day can do pretty much baitcaster can do even with big heavy swimbait. 

Now benefits of baitcaster TO ME anyway are rapid cast, more accuracy, less line twist problem and much more choice of line to use with.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, fishnkamp said:

Lets start this with a simple question. Where are you located?  We have members all over the place and many would be happy to give you some personal assistance. If you live anywhere near MD, DC, VA, DE or PA we could meet. I can cast and correctly set your rig up, then help you learn how to properly work with it. I can also bring one or two of my personal setups with some of my Daiwa reels so you can see what another rod and reel play like.  If you are not in my area, then I am sure another member would happily meet you at some school's grassy field or some pond for some one on one training.  That also helps to determine if the problem is a defective reel, improperly installed line (slipping on the spool), just poor casting techniques or some other issue.  I noticed your personal info says you are a newer member, so welcome to our playground.  As for your situation it helps to fill in your profile so members close to you know they can personally help. Another good reason is many of our members end up sharing fishing trips with other members. I personally have shared my boat with at least a dozen anglers from several websites I belong to.

Dallas TX area, I'd give you some time on a Sat afternoon no problem.  Where you from?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×