Jump to content
HTNFSH

High winds... which shore line

Recommended Posts

Ok, lets say you fishing this weekend. Forecast is rain and high winds 10-20mph from the south. 

 

You have 3 options. Fish the southern shore line and structure to stay protected, but in theory bait is pushed to the northern shore and structure all within a big bay that is just as wide as is long. Some grass, some wood and some sandy bottom. The 3rd option is to fish the southern shore line of the main lake, again protected by trees until you get 1/4 half mile from shore.

 

What would you do and why?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been getting  a lot of that lately, but at 20 MPH, I am gone.  In that situation I am on the North shore if I can a semi protected area.  If it is to windy and I am committed, I head to protected structure.  As Temps drops as it has recently, I also find almost any back cove will do

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spinnerbaits are a good lure to use in windy conditions. Use the wind to your advantage and do not fight it.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the winds are manageable I'll fish the wind blown shoreline.  If they are just too much to fish in, or I just plain old get tired to fish it anymore I'll go to the protected shoreline. 

 

I fish mainly in a kayak and to be honest I've had great luck sitting just inside the protected side of a point and casting out past the point into the wind. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of us kayakers here in Texas become experts at fishing in high winds. You almost have to, else greatly limit your time on the water.

 

Ideas I use:

 

1) If the wind is howling over a dam, there is often a dead air space under it . . . around the rip rap. Fish along the length of the dam;

2) If you have access to small islands, set up on the leeward side where the wind is forced left and right around the island and so is the current. So, you will often be sitting in dead water, wind at your back, but one can cast into the waves on either side;

3) If there are trees on the side of the lake where the wind is coming from, one can almost always get up shallow and the wind will blow over the water for some distance and it will remain rather calm. I'd look to snuggle up to a point where you'll often see dead water on one side, active waves on the other colliding with it. These areas attract fish;

4) And, finally, rivers and many coves. They are almost always studded with trees along their shorelines. And, they curve around meaning you can find places where the wind is coming in perpendicular to the river or cove's primary direction. The wind whistles overhead but the water is rather calm. Rivers are great for windy days.

 

I suppose I'd add that if the bait fish are being blown into the far corner of a lake, if you can get there safely (I often follow the perimeter of the lake to do so), you can beach your kayak, get out, and fish from remote banks that bank fisherman often don't have good access to. The wind will be blowing into your face. You might want to use spinning gear for less casting issues.

 

Brad

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will start out in the wind blown area until I get too annoyed, but really depends on how the fishing is. If I'm catching, obviously I keep at it. If it's uneventful, I'll just head to calmer areas where even if it's equally uneventful I'm at least focusing more on fishing vs boat maneuvering in the wind. By the way, a 17 ft Lund doesn't bode too well with wind, I feel like a cork out there sometimes. Talons help, but still...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I dont think the wind  pushes bait around , its under water . The waves stir things up in the shallows .attracting bait fish which starts a chain reaction ending with bass showing up.  Thats what I have observed . Barge waves on the Mississippi do the same thing along rip-rap banks , creating short feeding frenzies .

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Without a doubt, I'd be chucking a spinnerbait from the north shore.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I believe that current and wave action will push some bait (and bass) to the northern side of the lake, it is considerably less critical in the summer than in the early spring.  And fish are not as likely to relocate very far for a short term condition such as wind direction in the summertime.  Furthermore, depending upon your abilities, how high the winds are, etc, effective boat, lure, and line control can be the difference between detecting bites and catching fish and simply fighting the wind all day.  You can always fish the northern side and see how it goes.  If there are points where water eddies around them, these are good places to try.  The key is finding what works for you.  Stay mobile and flexible until you find what works (for you).

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would hit the wind blown northern shore first. If that doesn't produce I'll fish banks paralleling the wind. I start at the down wind point and keep the boat facing into the wind while working my bait perpendicular to the bank. Anytime I fish windy days (which I prefer) I'm always looking for mud lines. Mud lines are perfect ambush points that have produced many times for me. If I get to the point that I want to fish a windless area, I load the boat, get in my truck and head home. The 80 lb Terrova I-Pilot GPS  I've got mounted to my 1448 Jon has allowed me to spot lock and fish during small craft advisories. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can see boat control being an issue and factoring into the decision. I fish from shore and always follow the wind. The difference is obvious. If it's real windy I'll fish some kind of moving bait so I don't lose contact.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

North shore at the weedy area you mentioned, for sure. Dont try to get away from the wind. Going to protected areas will usually mean really slow action in my experiance.

   Wind pushes the little organisms that can't swim but just float to the wind beaten shore. The small minnows follow them, the baitfish follow them, the predators follow them, the anglers follow them. Hopefully nothing follows us.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me it is simple......I stay in the wind until I cant control the boat the way I want.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why limit yourself where to fish?

Back of a shallow wind blown bay wouldn't be my choice, the points entering the bay would be and any other structure that is wind blown should work. 

20 mph sustained wind is very different from gusts to 20 mph. Windy weather is part of bass fishing as long as it's safe to be on the water.

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would have to add the north shore and a spinner bait for sure.  Chances are you will zero in on them quicker this way and spinner baits are great in the chops.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm gonna head to the protected shore as it will be easier to determine if there are fish in that area

Sure in theory the windy shore may be holding fish, however your ability to control the boat and make accurate casts will also be affected

If this theory is true and the baitfish are on that north shore, they'll be there all day if the wind is blowing

 

I'm a topwater guy so I'm gonna start in the calmer water and if I'm not seeing any activity I'll move to the windy shore

 

Also from my experience living in Ohio when they say 10-20, it'll really be a 20 mph sustained wind with higher gusts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Ratherbfishing said:

While I believe that current and wave action will push some bait (and bass) to the northern side of the lake, it is considerably less critical in the summer than in the early spring.  And fish are not as likely to relocate very far for a short term condition such as wind direction in the summertime.  Furthermore, depending upon your abilities, how high the winds are, etc, effective boat, lure, and line control can be the difference between detecting bites and catching fish and simply fighting the wind all day.  You can always fish the northern side and see how it goes.  If there are points where water eddies around them, these are good places to try.  The key is finding what works for you.  Stay mobile and flexible until you find what works (for you).

I noticed you have a semi-seasonal breakdown between early Spring and Summer. Just out of curiosity (and semi-off topic), is that difference because of wind piling up warmer water in a particular area in the early Spring, thus (potentially) attracting fish to the warmer water temps?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I fish from the bank at least 5 days a week and walk a number of man made lakes that surround my house.  I pick what makes it easy for me.  With high winds I always try to have the wind to my back.  This is the easiest way to use a baitcaster with lures of all sizes, and weights.  I also like this because there is no slack in the line and you have sensitive contact with the bait.  Feeling the bite on a long cast is crucial to protecting the fish.  I like to get way out in deeper water and work it back slowly to the drop-offs and major depth change, and then work it up the slope.  I catch good numbers this way, with little problems with wind as high as 20-25.  Handling big winds is much easier from the bank then in the boat.  Water clarity is always better on the upwind side.  Good luck, and always keep it easiest on yourself!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’d find structure on the side that is getting the wind. Then I would drop anchor and see what happens. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, BassNJake said:

when they say 10-20, it'll really be a 20 mph sustained wind with higher gusts

Same here in Missouri .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/12/2019 at 2:32 PM, TotalNoob said:

I noticed you have a semi-seasonal breakdown between early Spring and Summer. Just out of curiosity (and semi-off topic), is that difference because of wind piling up warmer water in a particular area in the early Spring, thus (potentially) attracting fish to the warmer water temps?

Exactly.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing reels

    fishing reels

    fishing

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×
×
  • Create New...