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When to properly use monofilament

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Just wondering when to actually use it, I always here about using it with spooks or lighter treble hooker topwater. I’ve been fishing heavily for 3 years now and trying and learning as I go. This website is my go to just set up an account and figured this would be the true best route to get good knowledge on it. Wether it be leader to braid, on a m/m rod and how light do I go on mono mainline or leader???? Thanks guys

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Some people use it for everything.  Some use it in specific situations.  Some don't use it at all.   It's cheap, I would encourage you to try it with everything and see how you like it.  

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2 minutes ago, Tennessee Boy said:

Some people use it for everything.  Some use it in specific situations.  Some don't use it at all.   It's cheap, I would encourage you to try it with everything and see how you like it.  

Thanks for that solid yet obvious tip haha. I got 8 pound I wanted to try, use it for certain applications that allow a little more stretch. Always used it as a kid and everyone else in my family who just fish for fun strictly use it

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I think the advice @Tennessee Boy gave you is very good advice. I like a lot of different lines out there but when I get a window to go fishing, it's usually on the way home from work and I'll bank fish for a couple of hours. Mono is very easy to use if you're switching lures. It's a great starting point that you can always go back to.

 

Try it in different presentations and then make your determination as to using something different.

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Mono is cheap and easy and works. I used it exclusively for the past couple years for topwater to bottom and everwhere inbetween. 6 lb for lighter techniques, 12 lb for heavier. Your choice of 8 should be just fine as an all-arounder. Other line types may be better for specific applications (ex: fishing deep with a heavier lure, mono may have too much stretch to set the hook, or may have so much line out you won't feel the bite as well), but mono may excel at other applications (ex: topwater with lighter hooks/trebles - floating line and the slight stretch can help absorb shocks and keep the pressure on the fish.

 

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I use a quality copolymer line for 90%+ of my fishing. It's either Izorline XXX Super Copolymer for spinning (6 & 8#), or Silver Thread Excailbur for baitcasters (8-12#). The only time I use braid is for the main line when using a drop shot in deep water on the Great Lakes for smallies.

Including the smallmouth I catch on Erie, which is alot, I catch an average of around 2,000+ bass a year, and have had NO issues using a copolymer line, and I can not remember the last time I broke off (maybe once in the last 10 years). That has ALOT to do with matching line & rod power/action to the line I use, along with constantly checking line for any frays or nicks (and a good drag!)

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8 minutes ago, JLBBass said:

I use a quality copolymer line for 90%+ of my fishing. It's either Izorline XXX Super Copolymer for spinning (6 & 8#), or Silver Thread Excailbur for baitcasters (8-12#). The only time I use braid is for the main line when using a drop shot in deep water on the Great Lakes for smallies.

Including the smallmouth I catch on Erie, which is alot, I catch an average of around 2,000+ bass a year, and have had NO issues using a copolymer line, and I can not remember the last time I broke off (maybe once in the last 10 years). That has ALOT to do with matching line & rod power/action to the line I use, along with constantly checking line for any frays or nicks (and a good drag!)

I tried copolymer 1x and birdnested immediately 2 years ago. Granted it was my first baitcaster and hardly any experience. I wanna pick your brain as to which tactic you think it suits best. Braid is the same for me except around my area i frog a lot for snakeheads and bass and it gets insanely thick with vegetation

15 minutes ago, haggard said:

Mono is cheap and easy and works. I used it exclusively for the past couple years for topwater to bottom and everwhere inbetween. 6 lb for lighter techniques, 12 lb for heavier. Your choice of 8 should be just fine as an all-arounder. Other line types may be better for specific applications (ex: fishing deep with a heavier lure, mono may have too much stretch to set the hook, or may have so much line out you won't feel the bite as well), but mono may excel at other applications (ex: topwater with lighter hooks/trebles - floating line and the slight stretch can help absorb shocks and keep the pressure on the fish.

 

Pretty much puts research into concrete fact what you just stated. Appreciate the input. Might be the only time I truly use it as I’ve grown to love flouro for nedrigs and dropshots, flipping and everything else. What you said might apply to me cause this past outing I was hopping/dragging a dark sleeper and had a helluva thump. I really think I set the hook to quick but it doubled my 5 power over. I may try heavier mono to compensate my quick trigger habit. Plus I’m getting obsessed with lipless cranks and really wanna gain confidence in squarebills. I’ve had d**n good hook ups with red label fluorocarbon but lost a couple maybe at a 7/10 ratio. Which could happen anytime but everyone’s opinions are swaying me to atleast dedicate a rod to mono

Btw JLBBass great mention on sticking to the line guides for your rod, not a lot of people seem to think that’s as crucial as it is

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To me, you can use mono for anything you would use fluorocarbon for as well plus topwater, where you don't want to use fluorcarbon. I was reading tests that showed that mono stretches less than fluoro, the difference is that fluoro maintains its stretch where mono will eventually de-stretch, so ultimately flurocarbon will give a better hookset once "broken in", but that's largely irrelevant.

 

I will use mono exclusively for poppers and other topwater lures with treble hooks, but mono is will suited for jerkbaits, crankbaits, and spinnerbaits, as the stretch in the proper test mono can help land fish in all of these lures, and the float in the line can help a spinnerbait run straight as well, although on a M/M rod the only spinnerbaits you'd likely ever use are really small ones. I would say you could use 8lb or 10lb mono as a leader as a safe bet for most things you're likely to throw on a M/M rod. I imagine the rod is rated for 6-12lbs, which means that will likely be the best performing line with that rod as it's in the middle.

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Before the days of braid and flouro carbon, I fished with three lines: 8lb mono on my spinning reels (still do) 14lb mono on my baitcasters for everything except 20lb mono on a frog rod.  Put 12 or 14lb mono on your baitcasters and go fish.

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I use mono on nearly everything. There is no lure it won't work and no fish it wont catch. But I am a simple man. 

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3 hours ago, Boomstick said:

To me, you can use mono for anything you would use fluorocarbon for as well plus topwater, where you don't want to use fluorcarbon. I was reading tests that showed that mono stretches less than fluoro, the difference is that fluoro maintains its stretch where mono will eventually de-stretch, so ultimately flurocarbon will give a better hookset once "broken in", but that's largely irrelevant.

 

I will use mono exclusively for poppers and other topwater lures with treble hooks, but mono is will suited for jerkbaits, crankbaits, and spinnerbaits, as the stretch in the proper test mono can help land fish in all of these lures, and the float in the line can help a spinnerbait run straight as well, although on a M/M rod the only spinnerbaits you'd likely ever use are really small ones. I would say you could use 8lb or 10lb mono as a leader as a safe bet for most things you're likely to throw on a M/M rod. I imagine the rod is rated for 6-12lbs, which means that will likely be the best performing line with that rod as it's in the middle.

I’m for sure trying it out on topwater, might just rig it on my m/f spinning combo and dedicate that to those said baits. I will definitely look into the stretch that was my debate on using it and what for

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Mono is cheap?

Berkley Big Game is one of the lower cost mono lines, Sunline Defier one if the more expensive, Sunline Defier Armilo Nylon is less expensive and I use Armillo 25 lb for swimbaits and 11 lb & 13 lb for top water and crankbaits. Finesse spinning Maxima 5 lb Ultra Green mono for slip shot rig. Night fishing I use lb Big Game for worms and jigs in lieu of FC for more reliable knots at night.

I don't use braid with leaders.

Tom

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the Night bite, dying to really think cperiance a good one but mosquitoes on the eastern shore of Maryland take a dump on night fishing. Does the fact you use mono take away from the sensitivity feel at night? Also not using braid to a leader seems like it would but tying a leader knot at night just seems like a major pain in the ass

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38 minutes ago, OnthePotomac said:

Before the days of braid and flouro carbon, I fished with three lines: 8lb mono on my spinning reels (still do) 14lb mono on my baitcasters for everything except 20lb mono on a frog rod.  Put 12 or 14lb mono on your baitcasters and go fish.

Funny you said that I fished the upper Potomac for smallies and put mono on a baitcaster for the first time and it did me well. Though at the spot I sfished I had to re-tie a lot cause of all the rocks knocking it and then those browns digging in when they get hooked

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This year I will be using mono for everything but punching mats. 

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13 hours ago, JLBBass said:

I use a quality copolymer line for 90%+ of my fishing. It's either Izorline XXX Super Copolymer for spinning (6 & 8#), or Silver Thread Excailbur for baitcasters (8-12#). The only time I use braid is for the main line when using a drop shot in deep water on the Great Lakes for smallies.

Including the smallmouth I catch on Erie, which is alot, I catch an average of around 2,000+ bass a year, and have had NO issues using a copolymer line, and I can not remember the last time I broke off (maybe once in the last 10 years). That has ALOT to do with matching line & rod power/action to the line I use, along with constantly checking line for any frays or nicks (and a good drag!)

I'm sorry but 2,000 bass per year?

 

Leave some for me bro

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I still use it it one key situation. And that key situation is topwater fishing. Monofilament really does well for top waters for several reasons. First of all, monofilament, it floats. So, when you're using a topwater it's not gonna drag that bait down. But even better, this is what happens with bass anglers and I'm guilty as well. When that bass blows up on that lure, you want to set the hook really hard and right away. Sometimes, you jerk that lure away too quick and the bass doesn't get hooked. Well, monofilament has that stretch to it and so it gives that fish a little more time to grasp on to that lure before you jerk it away, and you can set the hook better. 
 
The other thing about monofilament is that typically with topwater baits like jerk baits, zara spooks, things like that, poppers. They have small treble hooks - real thin wire treble hooks. That monofilament, that stretch is what you need in that. Once you hook that fish and you're fighting back to the boat, it's gonna have that give to prevent that fish from throwing that hook or straightening it out or worse yet, breaking the line off.

 

So, that's why I like monofilament for topwater.  

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I use it for jerkbaits and crankbaits mainly. 

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Use it exclusively for topwaters as it floats and as Glenn said, gives you that hesitation you need due to stretch.  I use it on rattletraps and spinnerbaits as well.  

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Have gone back to mono almost exclusively except for braid/fluro leaders on spinning rods.  I realize the sensitivity is not there quite as much but then I'm a big time line watcher.  What I really like is that with the bit of supposedly more stretch I can set the hook harder without sad results.  I also don't have to worry about a backlash (as much) destroying my line because of a small kink.  Price is nice too...

Personal preference....glad I've gone back

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15 hours ago, LionHeart said:

I'm sorry but 2,000 bass per year?

 

Leave some for me bro

No joke! My boat (& whoever is fishing with me,) "logged" 2114 smallmouth alone from Lake Erie one season. That includes many 200+ bass days.

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I love mono I basically use it for everything except punching and frogging and some spinning applications

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On 3/6/2019 at 12:03 AM, Glenn said:

I still use it it one key situation. And that key situation is topwater fishing. Monofilament really does well for top waters for several reasons. First of all, monofilament, it floats. So, when you're using a topwater it's not gonna drag that bait down. But even better, this is what happens with bass anglers and I'm guilty as well. When that bass blows up on that lure, you want to set the hook really hard and right away. Sometimes, you jerk that lure away too quick and the bass doesn't get hooked. Well, monofilament has that stretch to it and so it gives that fish a little more time to grasp on to that lure before you jerk it away, and you can set the hook better. 
 
The other thing about monofilament is that typically with topwater baits like jerk baits, zara spooks, things like that, poppers. They have small treble hooks - real thin wire treble hooks. That monofilament, that stretch is what you need in that. Once you hook that fish and you're fighting back to the boat, it's gonna have that give to prevent that fish from throwing that hook or straightening it out or worse yet, breaking the line off.

 

So, that's why I like monofilament for topwater.  

Pretty much what I’ve concluded I’m gonna do and try out first. Just moved to an area loaded with stripers too so got some spooks to try out. Do you use a leader Glenn

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I use Mono/ Copoly for reaction baits (topwater, cranks, spinnerbaits, etc). Bottom stuff (worms, jigs, etc.) get flouro. Frogs get straight braid.

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