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Why do fishing rods have to be 1 long piece ? Is there tat much difference in it ?


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  • longer rods give you more leverage when setting the hook since they take up more line when swinging on fish.
  • you will get more casting distance with a longer rod compared to a shorter rod with the same power and action.

 

obviously for target casting you'd want a shorter rod for better accuracy. i fish 6'6" to 7'6" depending on the situation, cover, and bait choice.

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I’m not that tall. Standing on my boat deck I’m not all that far above water surface. My rods max out at 7’, one may be 7’2”. The way I fish on the river I would most likely handicap myself with anything longer. Be nice to have and try. That 7’2” MH Mod-Fast I really have only used in heavy grass and pads. And this part of fishing is admittedly my weakest point. Don’t see what difference 4-6 inches of more rod will do. At least when it comes to fishing. 

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The rod blank that is 1 piece transfers vibrations better then a rod cut into 2 pieces joined with a Ferrell. Longer rods with removable or telescoping handle are a good option, the rod blank is still 1 piece above the reel seat.

Fly rods are often 2 to 3 pice blanks for ease of transportation, the doesn’t need to transfer vibrations, just cast the heavy line.

Tom

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22 minutes ago, Jig Man said:

If you’d ever had a 2 piece rod come apart with a good fish on you wouldn’t have to ask that question.

Or have the top piece fly off on a cast! I’ve had that happen with my salmon rod. And I had to jump in a freezing river without waders to recover it. 
 

@cyclops2 It definitely seems to be a trend with bass rods and the longer they get the more challenging they will be to transport for me.  I use 2 piece rods for convenience (fit and hide in the trunk) and sadly they get more use than my one piece bass rods. When I do use my one piece rods I will never leave them exposed in the car. If I have to go into a store, they’re coming with me. Only an idiotic would leave them. You only increase the potential for theft and dealing with replacing broken window and your now stolen gear. 
 

Therefore, 2 piece rods for me except on the weekends. Sure they can still be stolen from the trunk, but I didn’t advertise it. 

 

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The math shows that spigot ferrules don't affect the bulk modulus change, and therefore the rod taper, across the joint.  (This is different for tip-over ferrules, which add a stiff spot).   Fisher and Tarantino knew this going into the '70s. 

 

What ferrules do add is weight, which most heavy-tip rods don't need the help there. 

In general, you appreciate the weight difference of a 1-pc rod, but may bemoan hauling it around. 

 

My latest favorite JDM rod brand, Valleyhill, offers some 1-pc rods, one of which I own. 

6'7" all-range BFS 1-pc

vP49A0k.jpg

But most of their rods are 2-pc spigot ferrule. 

They make up for the added ferrule weight by using all titanium-frame guides on their tip sections, and you'd be hard-pressed to notice they're 2-pc in all but convenience. 

7'5" MMHS 2-pc

irxd2LN.jpg

 

Another part of the good trend in rod-weight-loss-diet is needing less material to get the rod taper, incorporating helical graphite cloth layers and impregnated nano-resin. 

 

Different rod, but this is the extreme-light spigot on a high-grade Yamaga Blanks rod - freaking 8'3" (finesse) rod weighs under 2.6 oz. 

q2OAdVK.jpg

 

you guys who throw away your rod tips, use the thinnest film of Gulfwax (paraffin) on the spigot male.  Rub it on, then rub it all off - your rod will stay together and easily separate when you're taking it down. 

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I can't tell a difference in actual use, not that I've tried to notice one, but I have flung the tip out into the drink more then a few times.

 

I take a 2 and a 3 piece with me when I travel compare to just singles at home.

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35 minutes ago, islandbass said:

Only an idiotic would leave them. You only increase the potential for theft and dealing with replacing broken window and your now stolen gear. 


I leave my rods exposed in my car all the time so I guess I’m an idiot ??‍♂️ Never been a problem though. A lot depends on where you live and where you shop. Around here car break ins are rare, usually kids from the city looking for unlocked cars in the middle of the night. But it also helps leaving stickers off the car. Advertising your hobbies like that just lets thieves know that you probably have expensive gear in your car. 

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1 hour ago, Jig Man said:

If you’d ever had a 2 piece rod come apart with a good fish on you wouldn’t have to ask that question.


One of the rods in my bass arsenal is a two piece and for other species I run 2 pc to ease transportation, so I use quite a bit of two piece rods and it’s never happened to me. I heard it was a problem with 2 piece rods back in the day (?) I’m curious to see if anyone has had experiences similar to you 

 

I always thought it took away from the sensitivity, cliché I know, but that’s what I’ve heard 

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Don't know what "back in the day" amounts to but my multi piece St Croix's are 15 or so years old and they've come apart.

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Biggest issue I've had with 2 piece rods is having them separate at the ferrel while fishing......then SNAP.

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     Back in the olden days of fiberglass rods with metal ferrules to join the pieces together a two piece or multi piece rod was definitely considered less sensitive. The modern day graphite spigot joint fits much better and has much better sensitivity then "olden days" rods.  That is where I believe the origin of two or multi piece rods got the less sensitive phobia.

     I've got a bunch of travel rods (6-7) that I use when we vacation in Maine where flying is the only option to get there.  They range from three to five piece rods. I find it very hard to tell if they are less sensitive then my one piece rods. A little heavier for sure but I can still feel a bass suck in my bait. 

Fishingmickey 

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Thank you all.

I have never had the ferrule become loose. Never fly apart. I only have kept the rods that are stiff as possible.  Never pulled with the rod while on a snag. Drag is set for 4# or 6#Lines correctly. I do not catch several big bass each day or year.   

I can not tell the difference in weight or casting effort between all my spinning, stiff,  6 rods. All between 6' 6" and 7' 6".  I cast with 2 hands. That reduces wrist pain to nothing.  I did buy what I thought was a NORMAL 9'  spinning rod. It is a light duty salt water rod  I feel the weighta little. BUUTT  The tip speed does not toss my standard 1.5" Rapala any farther than a stiffest 6'6" 2 piece rod.  Same reel & 6# Braided line on both spinning rods.   That 1.5" Rapala weighs nothing.   

 

So I come up with heavy lures Can use the tip speed better. 

 

 

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I have had cheap two piece rods come apart during the cast. Went to one piece rods for a long while. Now I am gravitating to two piece higher quality rods out of convince. Had one too many times where bringing a one piece rod wasn't an option and missed fishing opportunities. 

 

I find that if you twist the blanks while inserting it seems to help the rod stay together during a cast. Haven't had an issue recently.

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46 minutes ago, king fisher said:

Multi piece rods don't fly apart, or break, while landing large hard fighting fish, all over the world, but can't catch bass.  Seems odd to me.

It has taken bass anglers decades to realize spinning tackle works for bass. 2 piece rods are still in the future as rods get too long to transport.

Tom

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A GOOD 2-3 piece rod is nearly indistinguishable from a COMPARABLE 1 piece. The problem is that it’s very rare to find that scenario. Modern built in ferrules are very well made in quality rods but people are jaded by their experience with lower quality rods (and thus ferrules) so they demand one piece in their longer quality rods. Since sensitivity can’t be measured, all we have are opinions this one just happens to be mine. 

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I have no reason to take my long sticks apart.  I had them all built to 7'10" so they'd fit in rod lockers that were only 8' long...had I realized when they were built that lockers would be getting longer I would have gone longer with many of them.  Any presentation that I cast and reel to retrieve or use the rod to bring it back I find the 7'6-8'6" range to be ideal.  The more I utilize the rod for the retrieve the more I lean closer to 7'6".  Pitching around objects and roll casting to targets I prefer 7'2-7'6, but over head casting or normal side arm casts I don't feel the need to shorten.  I used to have some 2 pieces for traveling, but now I travel with the boat so they became unecessary.

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4 hours ago, zpelletier said:


I leave my rods exposed in my car all the time so I guess I’m an idiot ??‍♂️ Never been a problem though. A lot depends on where you live and where you shop. Around here car break ins are rare, usually kids from the city looking for unlocked cars in the middle of the night. But it also helps leaving stickers off the car. Advertising your hobbies like that just lets thieves know that you probably have expensive gear in your car. 

Indeed. I live in a state if you give a tweaker inch, he’ll take everything including the kitchen sink. I totally agree with you about stickers! Someone once stole the metal rods that helps move a sink plunger up and down from a restroom in my work building. Leave nothing to chance, lol!

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6 hours ago, WRB said:

The rod blank that is 1 piece transfers vibrations better then a rod cut into 2 pieces joined with a Ferrell. Longer rods with removable or telescoping handle are a good option, the rod blank is still 1 piece above the reel seat.

Fly rods are often 2 to 3 pice blanks for ease of transportation, the doesn’t need to transfer vibrations, just cast the heavy line.

Tom

I'm going to go out on a limb and guess that the majority of graphite fly rods today are 4-piece.  In the couple months before Christmas I bought 6 fly rods (4 different brands) ranging from 8' to 9' long.  All 6 are 4-piece rods.  An older (like 25 years old) 9' 8wt of mine (a GL3) is a 2-piece rod.  An older 7'6" 3wt custom I bought almost 10 years ago is a 2-piece.

 

From what I've read, travel fly rods can come up to 8-piece.  2-piece fly rods have become the "novelties".

 

 

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